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Saving Throws. Origins.

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  • dylanalliata
    I can t believe that Donald Featherstone campaigned against saving throws since from what I can tell he is the first published source for saving throws. In War
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 23, 2002
      I can't believe that Donald Featherstone campaigned against saving
      throws since from what I can tell he is the first published source
      for saving throws. In War Games, 1962, Featherstone gives what I the
      first description of a saving throw. He uses it, in his Ancient,
      Horse and Musket, and Modern rules. The goal was very simple: reduce
      the rate of attrition. An earlier work by Joe Morschauer did not use
      a saving throw system. Instead Joe Morschauer invented the roster
      system to keep units from disappearing from the table. Well's did not
      have a saving throw, nor Sachs. Featherstone, in Skirmish Gaming
      published in 1970, used saving throws again, although this book used
      percentile dice.

      The early rules had high rates of attrition, something newer rules
      have dealt with either by reducing the casualty rates, or more likely
      by having complicated rules that make turns last hours, by which time
      the sudden disappearance of a unit is cause for joy. I personally am
      not found of saving throws. If you can't stand to watch your men die
      gloriously on one die throw, don't stand near the wargame table.
    • Ross W. Maker
      ... I was just reporting what I remember. And DF hasn t always been too consistent about things, especially use of rules mechanisms, either. ... Morschauser s
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 25, 2002
        dylanalliata wrote:
        >
        > I can't believe that Donald Featherstone campaigned against saving
        > throws since from what I can tell he is the first published source
        > for saving throws. In War Games, 1962, Featherstone gives what I the
        > first description of a saving throw. He uses it, in his Ancient,
        > Horse and Musket, and Modern rules. The goal was very simple: reduce
        > the rate of attrition.

        I was just reporting what I remember. And DF hasn't always been too
        consistent about things, especially use of rules mechanisms, either.

        > An earlier work by Joe Morschauer did not use
        > a saving throw system. Instead Joe Morschauer invented the roster
        > system to keep units from disappearing from the table.

        Morschauser's book is also from 1962.

        > Well's did not have a saving throw

        Given how hard it is to hit even a 54 with a spring loaded cannon, not
        surprising.

        > Featherstone, in Skirmish Gaming published in 1970, used saving throws again,
        > although this book used percentile dice.

        Like I said, Don wasn't above using it, he just argued against it in
        Wargamers Newsletter. I also remember him, in successive issues,
        arguing for and against varible length bounds. He also, IIRC,
        flip-flopped from time to time on the value of fantasy wargaming.

        RWM
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