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Re-patinate?

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  • Joerg Colberg
    Hey guys, Here s a question for the specialists: I have a coin that I zapped for a few hours - it was very heavily encrusted. Now that I m done I got a very
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2004
      Hey guys,

      Here's a question for the specialists: I have a coin that I
      zapped for a few hours - it was very heavily encrusted. Now
      that I'm done I got a very beautiful large Maximianus but,
      of course, it's down to the bare metal. I heard there are
      ways to re-patinate coins. How would that work?

      - Joerg
    • Tom Ross
      Here is the text of an email I sent out to some other people requesting this info. This is one way to repatinate coins it works for me. Man I have to get my
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2004
        Here is the text of an email I sent out to some other people requesting this info.
        This is one way to repatinate coins it works for me.  Man I have to get my site updated
        with this information.
         
        Tom
         
        I will soon have the page on repatinating coins, on my website finished,
        well I will have to start and finish it :)

        The way I repatinate my zapped coins is fairly easy and I think that they
        look good too.  Because you read the web pages you know that I use Arm &
        Hammer washing soda mixed with tap water for my electrolytic solution.  This
        is used to clean the coins.   Once the coins are clean and shiny, I through
        out that electrolyte and make a new solution of table salt and tap water.  I
        then zap a coin that I know is crappy and will not be any good.  This should
        produce a very dark gungey looking solution, you may have to zap for a
        while, but a half hour is usually enough.  There is no real secret here,
        just get the water real dirty looking.

        Now, reverse the leads of your zapper.  Put one of your shiny coins in the
        clip (the clip will eventually be destroyed, your coin also if you leave it
        too long)  Dip the coin into the dirty solution and leave for 15 or so
        seconds, remove the coin and observe the results.  I usually move the clip
        to a differnt spot so that the new patina evens out.  Dip it back into the
        solution and repeat as neccesarry.  By repatinating this way you are
        actually replating the patina back onto the shiny coins, this is the patina
        removed from the crappy coins.  You can even add some depth or thickness to
        the patina, try to do that with shoe polish!

        Now, take your coins that are repatinated and soak them in distilled water
        for a few days, maybe even change the water once.  After they have soaked
        bake them in the oven at about 125 C for an hour or so, this drives out all
        the water and also hardens the patina.  I then give them a shot of Renwax
        and a buffing on a dremel tool with a cloth polishing wheel.  I am very
        happy with the results.

        Any questions just ask, and please let me know how you make out.


        Joerg Colberg <joerg_colberg@...> wrote:
        Hey guys,

           Here's a question for the specialists: I have a coin that I
        zapped for a few hours - it was very heavily encrusted. Now
        that I'm done I got a very beautiful large Maximianus but,
        of course, it's down to the bare metal. I heard there are
        ways to re-patinate coins. How would that work?

        - Joerg



        Yahoo! Groups Links



        Tom Ross (jawboney)


        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool. Try it!

      • Glenn Simonelli
        Perhaps I m just an old fogey, but I consider repatination to be somewhat dishonest, morally similar to re-silvering worn antoniniani. It s one thing to take
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 2, 2004
          Perhaps I'm just an old fogey, but I consider repatination to be somewhat dishonest, morally similar to re-silvering worn antoniniani. It's
          one thing to take off unwanted junk, but added something to a coin that wasn't originally a part of the coin just to improve its
          appearance strikes me as a deliberate deception. Does anyone else have a problem with this, or am I just being too anal?

          Glenn Simonelli
          My web page: http://mypage.iu.edu/~gsimonel/roman1.htm

          --- In CoinZappers@yahoogroups.com, "Joerg Colberg" <joerg_colberg@y...> wrote:
          > Hey guys,
          >
          > Here's a question for the specialists: I have a coin that I
          > zapped for a few hours - it was very heavily encrusted. Now
          > that I'm done I got a very beautiful large Maximianus but,
          > of course, it's down to the bare metal. I heard there are
          > ways to re-patinate coins. How would that work?
          >
          > - Joerg
        • Kevin & Joanne Ingleston
          Glenn I wrestle with this too. I m somewhat new to this hobby. I have overcleaned coins, and I have re-patinated them. Any coin that I repatinate, I intend to
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 2, 2004
            Glenn
            I wrestle with this too. I'm somewhat new to this hobby. I have
            overcleaned coins, and I have re-patinated them. Any coin that I
            repatinate, I intend to keep in my personal collection, and want to
            improve its aesthetics, for my enjoyment. If I were ever to sell the
            coin, I would divulge the fact that it was repatinated, and let the
            buyer decide for themselves. I would hope that a reputable dealer of
            ancients would do the same. It is a tricky issue, one that every
            collector will have to decide for themselves. I am interested in seeing
            what other people have to say about the issue.

            Thnaks
            Kevin (phead65)
          • Tom Ross
            Hi Glenn, Nope I don t find repatinating coins dishonest or morally bad, I do think that selling a coin that has been repatinated, and not making the fact
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 2, 2004
              Hi Glenn,
               
              Nope I don't find repatinating coins dishonest or morally bad,  I do think that selling a coin that has been repatinated, and not making the fact clear certainly is.
               
              I repatinate my zapped coins to make them look nice to me! I suspect that someday I will sell some of them and each coin in my collection that has been repatinated has a note in the data base record, and this fact will be made clear in the ad.  More than likely they will be sold in small lots (I am only speculating right now). 
               
              The way I repatinate coins at least puts back onto the coins some of the original patina that was stripped off, better than shoe polish.  I expect that my method could fool a lot of people, but I have not intention of doing that.
               
              So I will continue to repatinate my shiney zapped coins and make them look nice to me, but rest assured that if any move out of my collection the buyer will know what he's getting.  BTW I am reasonably certain that a couple of eBay dealers do repatinate some of their coins and sell them.  Reasonably certain though does not give me the right to name names without more proof.
               
              Dishonesty comes when somebody represents an item as something that its not.  So the act of repatinating a coin does not make one dishonest, but selling it as a coin with the original patina is.
               
              OK, thats my 2 AE4's worth.
               
              Tom
               


              Glenn Simonelli <gsimonel@...> wrote:
              Perhaps I'm just an old fogey, but I consider repatination to be somewhat dishonest, morally similar to re-silvering worn antoniniani. It's
              one thing to take off unwanted junk, but added something to a coin that wasn't originally a part of the coin just to improve its
              appearance strikes me as a deliberate deception. Does anyone else have a problem with this, or am I just being too anal?

              Glenn Simonelli
              My web page: http://mypage.iu.edu/~gsimonel/roman1.htm

              --- In CoinZappers@yahoogroups.com, "Joerg Colberg" <joerg_colberg@y...> wrote:
              > Hey guys,
              >
              >    Here's a question for the specialists: I have a coin that I
              > zapped for a few hours - it was very heavily encrusted. Now
              > that I'm done I got a very beautiful large Maximianus but,
              > of course, it's down to the bare metal. I heard there are
              > ways to re-patinate coins. How would that work?
              >
              > - Joerg



              Yahoo! Groups Links



              Tom Ross (jawboney)


              Do you Yahoo!?
              Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool. Try it!

            • Alfredo De La Fé
              It s a sticky issue. Even museums do restoration work to their displays and collections. The whole idea is that a person can not tell the difference and that
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 3, 2004
                It's a sticky issue. Even museums do restoration work to their displays and
                collections. The whole idea is that a person can not tell the difference
                and that all damage, blemishes and disfigurements are corrected.

                I would rather have a re-patinated coin then a coin that I can not enjoy
                because the patina (or crud) is obstructing the detail.

                Any coins that I sell I will be sure to point out whether or not >I<
                re-patinated. It would be difficult to speak for all of the wholesalers,
                although you are safe with guys like Pagane coins (From everything I have
                heard and seen he does an amazing job at cleaning his coins).

                -Alfredo
              • Jerry Jones
                Very good point Alfredo. As an artist I have helped in a bit of restoration and cleaning of a painting or two.. I agree with you entirely on being able to see
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 3, 2004
                  Very good point Alfredo. As an artist I have helped in
                  a bit of restoration and cleaning of a painting or
                  two.. I agree with you entirely on being able to see
                  the coin. I sometimes think of the "patina" as I would
                  think of the "patina" on a painting.. it needs to be
                  cleaned.. now to what degree that is another issue..
                  That goes back to the old adage.. beauty IS in the eye
                  of the beholder. Art History was one of my college
                  teaching responsibilities at one in addition to my
                  studio teaching. The one definitve thing I learned is
                  that I cannot tell another person what is "good" and
                  what is "bad".. Consequently, I do not allow my ego to
                  try to dictate to others what is right and what is
                  wrong.. I am a firm believer in knowing what is good
                  intuitively. Your points are very valid in my opinion
                  and I for one appreciate your post.. thanks and God
                  Bless.. Jerry..
                  --- Alfredo_De_La_F� <delafe@...> wrote:
                  > It's a sticky issue. Even museums do restoration
                  > work to their displays and
                  > collections. The whole idea is that a person can
                  > not tell the difference
                  > and that all damage, blemishes and disfigurements
                  > are corrected.
                  >
                  > I would rather have a re-patinated coin then a coin
                  > that I can not enjoy
                  > because the patina (or crud) is obstructing the
                  > detail.
                  >
                  > Any coins that I sell I will be sure to point out
                  > whether or not >I<
                  > re-patinated. It would be difficult to speak for
                  > all of the wholesalers,
                  > although you are safe with guys like Pagane coins
                  > (From everything I have
                  > heard and seen he does an amazing job at cleaning
                  > his coins).
                  >
                  > -Alfredo
                  >
                  >
                  >


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