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RE: [CoinZappers] Re: OK, I guess I am hooked

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  • Bob Lilja
    What you are doing is setting up a cell wherein the coin becomes the anode and the first thing dissolved is the silver tarnish compound. The same happens if
    Message 1 of 21 , Apr 2, 2009
      What you are doing is setting up a cell wherein the coin becomes the anode and the first thing dissolved is the silver tarnish compound.



      The same happens if you put and iron nail and a copper screw in a slightly acid solution: the copper goes into solution and plates out on the iron nail. Likewise, a zinc strip becomes a "sacrificial anode" in a water heater.



      Industry uses a DC current to "electropolish" stainless steel boat rails because the high points dissolve first and give a smooth appearance to the pipe.





      To: CoinZappers@yahoogroups.com
      From: calvin@...
      Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2009 14:21:32 +0530
      Subject: Re: [CoinZappers] Re: OK, I guess I am hooked





      I have tried the method given below by Bob, at least
      on 200 silver coins of terrible condition. Of them almost
      190 did not need anything except a good brushing
      with a toothbrush after they were dipped
      in lemon juice in the manner he mentioned. I
      needed 2 to 10 hours but the result was
      unusually good. I strongly endorse his method
      (auto-electrolysis) on the basis of empirical studies
      on silver coins from Mugal era.

      Johnson C. Philip
      www.CoinsEncyclopedia.Com

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: beffler@...
      To: CoinZappers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 7:27 AM
      Subject: [CoinZappers] Re: OK, I guess I am hooked

      I read this group regularly, but don't contribute much. In this case I feel
      compelled to do so.

      If the coin is of noble silver (not billon), zapping a coin of this type is
      an abuse of the coin. There are other ways to remove unwanted sediments. But
      not electrolytically.

      Sediments from noble silver coins can be removed by using a less harsh,
      simple process.

      Take an aluminum soda pop can. Turn it upside down (after drinking the
      contents, of course ;->). fill the bottom cavity with lemon juice, then deposit
      the coin in the liquid. What happens in this case is, is that the combination
      of the silver coin, the aluminum can, and the citric acid in the lemon juice,
      actually create a mild electrical current that has a more gentile effect on
      the coin, including preserving the toning / patina that is sometimes intact,
      if you watch it carelylly and work the coin under a microscope properly.Here's
      an example (valuable coin):

      This is an extreme example to use. But its shows what can be done, with this
      method. And the coin is not really stripped, as what happens with
      electrolysis. Using that process on LRBs is one thing. But not for use on silver.

      There are ways to treat billon and silver washed ants as well.

      Just my two cents worth, for those who do not wish to ruin silver.

      Comments welcome, of course.

      Bob Effler
      Los Angeles, CA.
      **************Feeling the pinch at the grocery store? Make meals for Under
      $10. (http://food.aol.com/frugal-feasts?ncid=emlcntusfood00000002)

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