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Newsletter---Career Path Thoughts

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  • John Agno
    Career Path Thoughts Job and career changes reflect not only the times but also, more importantly, a natural inclination to dabble and learn-so say career
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 13, 2008
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      Career Path Thoughts

      Career_pathJob and career changes reflect not only the times but also, more importantly, a natural inclination to dabble and learn—so say career coaches John Agno and Rick Gee.

      Looking back upon how his own life and career fell into place, Agno discovered this fact of life firsthand.  He changed jobs every seven years before settling into a career he was passionate about: coaching senior technology executives—CTOs, CIOs and CEOs.

      Along with a growing number of workplace advisers, Agno and Gee concur that there is no defined path to any professional career.  Gee adds that the entire notion of the career path has gone the way of the dinosaur.

      "More commonly, most people will travel several paths in the course of their lifetime," says Agno.  "Typically, our early years are spent gravitating toward professions or vocations that are in tune with our personalitiesCareer adjustments, whether they happen early or in mid-career, are normal and natural.  Every accomplishment and failure prepares you for what's ahead."

      Management consultant, author and motivational speaker Tom Peters says, "There is no single path to success."  For more, read the complete article.

      Source: CIO magazine, February 4, 2008


      Generational Dress Code Divide

      Gen_yMany members of the so-called Millennial Generation or Gen Y have never been schooled in the traditions that previous generations learned at their parents' knees.  Yet, these 20somethings are still being evaluated by old-school bosses and clients.   

      The problem is that most senior managers and executives in business don’t think of clothing as an expression of self.  Instead, they view their suits as the “uniform of business.”  It’s what they wear to identify what team they’re playing for in the game of business.  Yet, for young men and women, a business suit is an uncomfortable yoke to be dusted off for special occasions. 

      Business school grads and law associates' casual attitude doesn't allow them to connect the dots between what they wear and how they come across.  Take Bard Tobin, 25, who is working at a midtown Manhattan law firm.  He is certain that clothes don't affect job assignments at his firm.  "Not at all--it's really based on work product," says Mr. Tobin, who is working part-time while he completes law school.  He says he owns suits but doesn't bother to wear them at work.

      "Getting up in the morning and putting on a suit is hard," says Sara Shikhman, a 26-year-old legal associate in New York.  She says she hasn't worn one in six months.  When associates show up at work in suits, their peers think they have a job interview, Ms. Shikhman says.  "Guys don't really polish their shoes," she adds.  They go for cool, rather than traditional.  She recognizes that her firm's partners "definitely look more put together than associates, but they also get more sleep than the associates."

      Yet, in lawyering, as in business, half the battle is the posturing.  Many experienced lawyers see their wardrobe as a tool to win the trust of clients, juries and judges.  Legal associates who aren't prepared may not be invited along to a new client pitch or to take a leading role in court, regardless of the office's stated "business casual" dress code.

      Women_executives “…if you want to be part of the management team, you need to wear the uniform.” Pat Heim

      What is the "business casual" dress code?

      Most managers and staff wear this type of clothing because it's comfortable, but it has a down-to-business attitude.

       

      ·  Men: Wear higher-quality khakis, micro fiber or gabardine pants with solid or subtly patterned pressed cotton shirts. Polo-style shirts and pullover sweaters are also appropriate. Finish the look with leather loafers and casual, coordinated accessories.

      ·  Women: Wool, blend or manufactured fabric skirts or slacks, combined with coordinating blouses or tops, are appropriate. You can also wear sweaters, cardigans or contrasting vests. Top off your outfit with flat leather shoes and casual, coordinating accessories.

      Women managers can learn more about how to win at the game of business at: www.ExecutiveWoman.info

      Source: The Wall Street Journal, January 31, 2008 


      The Newly Vulnerable

      EarthSpreading globalization and information technology are hollowing out the U.S. middle class.  The growth of low-wage work abroad and high-speed telecommunications make it possible to handle more jobs off-shore.

      The gains from free trade may increasingly be going to a small group at the top.  For the vast majority of Americans income growth has all but disappeared in recent years.  Inflation adjusted earnings have fallen in every educational category other than the 4% who hold doctorates or professional degrees.  In university towns, like here in Ann Arbor, MI where bookseller Borders began, you will find many of those with doctorates working in retail stores.

      Such numbers suggest the share of Americans who aren't included in the gains from trade may be very big.  "That's a very important change from earlier generations, and it should give pause to people who say they know what's going on," says Dartmouth's Matthew J. Slaughter, an international economist who served on President George W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisers.

      Eventually, up to 40 million service jobs in the U.S. could face competition from workers in India and other low-wage nations.  That's more than a quarter of the 140 million employed in the U.S. today.  Many of the newly vulnerable will be in skilled fields, such as accounting or research--jobs U.S. companies will be able to move offshore in ever greater numbers.

      Since many U.S. workers aren't sharing in the gains from open markets, a political blowback is possible to create some form of income redistribution that spreads the gains from free trade to more workers.

      Source: BusinessWeek, February 11, 2008


      Take Time for Your Valentine

      Woman_laptopIn our 24/7 lifestyle, allowing technology in the bedroom is sure to result in love lost.

      Boomer women today have less time for sex than their 1950s counterparts.  And it's estimated that 40 million Americans have what experts call a sexless marriage (having sex less than 10 times a year). 

      A regular sex life is good for your health. It can satisfy all sorts of emotional and physical intimacy needs and help partners stay close, says Anita H. Clayton, M.D., a professor of psychiatry at the University of Virginia and author of "Satisfaction: Women, Sex, and the Quest for Intimacy."  So why the dry spell?  You can chalk it up to a sheer lack of time, but there are a slew of other reasons, too -- from weight gain and perimenopause to technology overload (stop texting now) in the bedroom.

      Valentine's Day is a big day for Baby Boomers.

      Any other day of the year, an ugly sweater or a cheap-looking pair of earrings is just further evidence of your poor shopping skills.  On Valentine's Day, it becomes a "symbol of our relationship."   Get it wrong, and it may be your last.

      Aging Boomers are facing the ‘use it or lose it’ proposition when it comes to their sexual health.  So they’re getting pumped up to re-invent their sexuality...and...Valentine's Day is the most pumped up day of the year for Boomers to show their stuff. 

      The bed should be used for sex and sleep only.  So why do so many of us insist on bringing third parties -- laptops, PDAs, "Law & Order" -- into the boudoir?  Perhaps it's time to make the bedroom a no-technology zone and give sex the priority it deserves.  If you have to schedule sex as you would a meeting, just do it!

      24hoursEmotion is the messenger of love; it is the vehicle that carries every signal from one brimming heart to another.

      For more Valentine's Day tips, visit these sites: www.WhatisLove.info, www.LawofLove.com, www.LawofReciprocity.com, and www.TestforLove.com 

         


      "You and I do what many dream of, all their lives."

      ThumbsupJohn G. Agno, Editor, mailto:johnagno@...

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