Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re:Study: Global warming linked to severe allergies, asthma

Expand Messages
  • P. Neuman self only
    ... Dee, Mike Neuman and others are more familiar with the subject of asthma and other allergies than I am. Thus perhaps others will comment. I will send a
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 30, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Dee wrote:
      >
      > If this is supposed to be a scientific study - they
      > missed a few details in their collection of information
      > along the way.
      >
      > There hasn't been enough 'global warming' to cause
      > the level of asthma and other allergies they are studying.
      >
      > They are leaving out other things that kids experience
      > just as wholesale immunizations kids are subjected
      > to as infants, as well as the junk that is falling out of
      > the skies - that we call 'chemtrails' and which
      > science/government refuses to acknowledge.
      > See http://www.greatdreams.com/chems.htm
      >
      > The list of chemicals coming out of these white clouds
      > that lay across out skies is appalling. That's where
      > science needs to look - not on the weather.
      >

      Dee,

      Mike Neuman and others are more familiar with the subject of asthma and
      other allergies than I am. Thus perhaps others will comment. I will
      send a Cc of this message to P&C so people can respond on the P&C
      discussion forum, at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Paleontology_and_Climate/

      The articles on this ClimateArchive group are posted for discussion by
      members of the P&C discussion group.

      I have one comment. The article says:

      >> Global warming may be increasing the severity
      >> of allergies and asthma, ...

      You said:
      > There hasn't been enough 'global warming' to cause
      > the level of asthma and other allergies they are studying.

      I think higher temperatures, more frequent drought (and blowing dust)
      would increase the severity of allergies and asthma along with many other
      "things that kids experience ... as you said.

      Pat


      -----
      > Study: Global warming linked to severe allergies, asthma
      >
      > By JOAN LOWY
      > Scripps Howard News Service
      > 04/29/2004
      >
      > WASHINGTON -- Global warming may be increasing the severity of
      > allergies and asthma, particularly among inner-city children,
      > according to a report released Thursday by Harvard University
      > researchers and the American Public Health Association.
      >
      > Increases in atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide combined with
      > warmer temperatures are having profound effects on plant growth,
      > causing some plants in the United States and elsewhere to flower
      > earlier in the spring and to release greater amounts of pollen while
      > in flower, the report said.
      >
      > Most scientists believe that pollution from coal-fired power plants
      > and automobiles are responsible for the increase in atmospheric
      > levels of carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas chiefly responsible for
      > global warming.
      >
      > Plants breathe carbon dioxide much the way people breathe oxygen.
      > The more carbon-rich atmosphere is spurring fungal growth, which
      results
      > in the release of more mold allergens, and increases the growth
      > of "opportunistic weeds" like ragweed and poison ivy that flourish
      > in cities, scientists said.
      >
      > Pollen and mold don't cause asthma, but they can exacerbate the
      > condition, the report said. At the same time, diesel particulates
      > from trucks and buses in traffic-congested cities help deliver
      > pollen and mold to the immune system in the lungs, the report said.
      >
      > Between 1980 and 1994, asthma among preschool children increased 160
      > percent and 75 percent in the general population, the report said.
      > The highest incidence of asthma is found among low-income, African-
      > American toddlers, a large share of whom live in urban areas, the
      > report said.
      >
      > Asthma rates are also strikingly high along inner-city bus routes
      > and areas with high traffic congestion, scientists said.
      >
      > "This is a real wake-up call for people who mistakenly think global
      > warming is only going to be a problem way off in the future or that
      > it has no impact on their lives in a meaningful way," said Christine
      > Rogers, a senior scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health
      > and
      > co-author of the report.
      >
      > About 40 million Americans have hay fever and an estimated 318
      > million workdays are lost each year as the result of allergies,
      > Rogers said.
      >
      > While carbon dioxide is a natural part of the atmosphere, CO2 levels
      >
      > have increased from about 280 parts per billion at the start of the
      > industrial revolution to 379 parts currently.
      >
      > The atmosphere directly above cities may be even richer in carbon
      > dioxide. Domes of carbon dioxide of between 400 and 600 parts have
      > been measured above Baltimore and Phoenix, and there are indications
      >
      > the same may be true of other cities, said Dr. Paul Epstein,
      > associate director of the Harvard public health school.
      >
      > "The inner cities have become harbingers of global change," Epstein
      > said.
      >
      > On the Net: www.med.harvard.edu/chge
      >
      > (Contact Joan Lowy at LowyJ(at)SHNS.com. Distributed by Scripps
      > Howard News Service, http://www.shns.com)
      >
      http://www.knoxstudio.com/shns/?action=detail&pk=CLIMATEDISEASE-04-29-04j
      2997
      >
      >



      ________________________________________________________________
      The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
      Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
      Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
    • P. Neuman self only
      Hi Dee, Thank you for the message. I will forward your message, with this reply, to the Paleontology_and_Climate (P&C) group for discussion by others. I
      Message 2 of 2 , May 2, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Dee, Thank you for the message. I will forward your message, with
        this reply, to the Paleontology_and_Climate (P&C) group for discussion by
        others. I may have some comments later. I have a lot of backyard work
        for today. Pat

        - - MANAGEMENT ACTION BY GROUP OWNER - -
        Messages sent accidentally to ClimateArchive-owner or npat1
        will be forwarded to the list at P&C (in most cases).
        - - END OF MANAGEMENT ACTION BY GROUP OWNER - -
        ------------------------------

        From: Dolores Finney <lotusbud777@...>
        To: "P. Neuman self only" <npat1@...>
        Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 09:45:51 -0700 (PDT)
        Subject: Re:Study: Global warming linked to severe allergies, asthma

        On Sun, 2 May 2004 09:45:51 -0700 (PDT) Dolores Finney
        <lotusbud777@...> writes:
        > Hi Pat: I heard some statistics on the increase of asthma and
        > allergies in Los Angeles recently. There is no drought there and no
        > 'real' global warming in L. A. itself - though in northern
        > California, we were up 15 degrees above normal this winter on many
        > days.
        >
        > My earthchanges list has been tracking things like this since 1997.
        > Here is one example of a news article on this exact topic.
        >
        > Posted on Mon, Feb. 23, 2004_krdDartInc++;document.write('');
        > Child Asthma Rises in Los Angeles Area with Growing Exhaust
        > Pollution
        > By Charles F. Bostwick, Daily News, Los Angeles Knight
        > Ridder/Tribune Business News
        >
        >
        > Feb. 23 - Asthma among children is rising -- affecting an estimated
        > 390,000 youngsters in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside and
        > Orange counties -- and exhaust from a growing number of cars and
        > trucks is among the suspected causes.
        >
        > Air pollution is known to hinder lung development, increase asthma
        > among athletes and cause coughs and runny noses, but experts say
        > many other factors could be causing the asthma epidemic.
        >
        > While smog and ozone levels have fallen sharply in Southern
        > California over the last three decades, there has been no progress
        > in the last five years and in some ways air pollution is getting
        > worse. Pollution from diesel engines is increasing -- fed, in part,
        > by major expansion of shipping at the ports of Long Beach and Los
        > Angeles and the truck traffic that comes with more international
        > trade.
        >
        > "We always thought air pollution had acute effects: If you breathed
        > bad air one day, you felt crappy that night," said University of
        > Southern California professor James Gauderman, a researcher in a
        > landmark $10 million study that watched 5,600 California youngsters
        > over 10 years. "Long-term exposure, day-in, day-out, in an area like
        > Los Angeles, really appears to have detrimental effects on kinds of
        > chronic conditions."
        >
        > Even when parents don't notice smog is particularly bad, it can
        > sicken their children. A 20 parts-per-billion increase in ozone
        > increases school absences 83 percent within a few days due to
        > coughs, asthma attacks and runny noses, the USC researchers found.
        >
        > In communities with high ozone levels, like much of the Inland
        > Empire, youths who play three or more team sports are three or four
        > times more likely to develop asthma than youngsters who spend more
        > time watching TV inside, where ozone levels are lower.
        >
        > Asthma itself is increasing among youngsters for reasons that aren't
        > entirely clear, since what causes childhood asthma is not entirely
        > clear. In the 1980s and 1990s, children's hospitalization due to
        > asthma went up 70 percent, while all other age groups' asthma
        > hospitalization rates went down.
        >
        > "It's hard to breathe. I squeak when I try to talk," said San
        > Bernardino 8-year-old Jonah Ramirez, who suffered his first asthma
        > attack a year ago while skateboarding.
        >
        > "We didn't know what was going on. Nobody in our family has asthma.
        >
        > Nobody smokes," said his mother, Tresa Ramirez.
        >
        > Jonah is the most active of her three sons, Ramirez said. He plays
        > roller-hockey and soccer, skateboards and in-line skates, and is
        > outside until sundown every day. Smog is particularly bad at the
        > family's house because it backs up against the nearby San Bernardino
        > Mountains.
        >
        > "If the heat's too high or we've having a really smoggy day, I have
        > to keep him inside," she said.
        >
        > Besides traffic, possible causes for the increase in asthma cases
        > could be exposure to weedkillers, pesticides or cockroaches in the
        > home before age 1 or expectant mothers smoking.
        >
        > Even starting day care before age 4 months could be a cause because
        > of exposure to the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
        >
        > One idea is that modern life's cleanliness could be a culprit. The
        > human immune system -- which used to be busy fighting off parasitic
        > worms and amoebas -- goes into imbalance and results in asthma and
        > allergies.
        >
        > "If I understood exactly how asthma was caused in kids, they'd give
        > me a Nobel Prize," said Dr. John Balmes, an American Lung
        > Association of California volunteer and a professor of medicine at
        > the University of California, San Francisco, and of environmental
        > health science at the University of California at Berkeley.
        >
        > Still the worst in the nation, Southern California's air pollution
        > has become worse the last two summers, mainly because of weather
        > conditions. There's been no improvement for five years, although
        > progress before that had been great.
        >
        > Stage 1 smog alerts -- linked mostly to ozone, the pollutant that
        > causes eyes to burn and lungs to ache -- decreased from 120 in 1979
        > to zero from 1999 to 2002, and there was just one last summer. The
        > last Stage 2 smog alert -- of which there were 17 in 1979 -- was in
        > 1988.
        >
        > "There's been some clear success," Gauderman said. "Ozone has been a
        > huge success story."
        >
        > But the Southland's air still falls far short of meeting federal
        > standards.
        >
        > While ozone has been under regulation for decades, for example,
        > regulation of tiny airborne particles has just been stepped up in
        > recent years. The crackdown on particulate emissions was driven by
        > studies showing that high-particulate days brought more deaths of
        > older people with heart and lung ailments.
        >
        > Nitrogen dioxide, another common air pollutant, may worsen the
        > reaction of asthmatic youngsters' allergies to other substances,
        > like dust mites, and allergies are strong risk factors for asthma,
        > Balmes said.
        >
        > European studies have shown that children living next to busy roads
        > have more asthma.
        >
        > "There is no doubt in my mind that his asthma was definitely caused
        > by the air quality here," said Long Beach resident Britt Rios-Ellis
        > of her asthmatic 3-year-old son, Quique. "Had we been living
        > someplace else, this probably wouldn't have happened."
        >
        > The Rios-Ellis home is near the San Diego Freeway. Rios-Ellis said
        > she must clean black soot off tables in the back yard.
        >
        > "Had I known what I know now, I never would have moved that close to
        > a freeway," Rios-Ellis said.
        >
        > Ozone, nitrogen dioxide, diesel-exhaust particles and ultrafine
        > particles all are capable of causing something called oxidative
        > stress in cells and tissues. Lung cells exposed to those substances
        > release "messenger molecules" that turn up the inflammatory
        > response, a bad thing in asthmatic youngsters' already inflamed lung
        > passages.
        >
        > "Cells have to sort of work harder to protect themselves from
        > damage," Balmes explained.
        >
        > Looking into children's lung development in communities from
        > Atascadero to Lancaster, Long Beach and Upland, the USC researchers
        > expected ozone to harm lung development.
        >
        > Ozone was linked to more asthma in athletic youths, but lung
        > development rates were affected by nitrogen dioxide, fine particles
        > and vapors of nitric, formic and acetic acids, which come from gas-
        > and diesel-powered vehicles and industrial plants.
        >
        > "We have the port. We have the refinery. We have the trucks. I think
        > that's why this area is so bad," said West Long Beach resident
        > Evangelina Ramirez, no relation to Tresa Ramirez, whose 6-year-old
        > daughter, Lorena, has had asthma since infancy.
        >
        > When youngsters moved out of Southern California, their lung
        > development improved -- if they moved into a community with lower
        > particulate pollution. If particulate pollution was worse, their
        > lung development slowed.
        >
        > That finding is actually reassuring, researchers say, because it
        > means lung damage from pollution is reversible, at least for
        > children, whose lungs are still growing.
        >
        > The USC researchers are continuing their study of the youngsters
        > into adulthood to see what further changes they have. They also are
        > recruiting more youngsters to study the effects on lungs of genetics
        > and of eating fruits, vegetables and antioxidants.
        >
        > Eric Johnson contributed to this story.
        >
        > -----
        >
        > To see more of the Daily News, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go
        > to http://www.dailynews.com
        >
        > � 2004, Daily News, Los Angeles. Distributed by Knight
        > Ridder/Tribune Business News.
        >
        >
        > "P. Neuman self only" <npat1@...> wrote:
        > Dee wrote:
        > >
        > > If this is supposed to be a scientific study - they
        > > missed a few details in their collection of information
        > > along the way.
        > >
        > > There hasn't been enough 'global warming' to cause
        > > the level of asthma and other allergies they are studying.
        > >
        > > They are leaving out other things that kids experience
        > > just as wholesale immunizations kids are subjected
        > > to as infants, as well as the junk that is falling out of
        > > the skies - that we call 'chemtrails' and which
        > > science/government refuses to acknowledge.
        > > See http://www.greatdreams.com/chems.htm
        > >
        > > The list of chemicals coming out of these white clouds
        > > that lay across out skies is appalling. That's where
        > > science needs to look - not on the weather.
        > >
        >
        > Dee,
        >
        > Mike Neuman and others are more familiar with the subject of asthma
        > and
        > other allergies than I am. Thus perhaps others will comment. I will
        > send a Cc of this message to P&C so people can respond on the P&C
        > discussion forum, at:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Paleontology_and_Climate/
        >
        > The articles on this ClimateArchive group are posted for discussion
        > by
        > members of the P&C discussion group.
        >
        > I have one comment. The article says:
        >
        > >> Global warming may be increasing the severity
        > >> of allergies and asthma, ...
        >
        > You said:
        > > There hasn't been enough 'global warming' to cause
        > > the level of asthma and other allergies they are studying.
        >
        > I think higher temperatures, more frequent drought (and blowing
        > dust)
        > would increase the severity of allergies and asthma along with many
        > other
        > "things that kids experience ... as you said.
        >
        > Pat
        >


        ________________________________________________________________
        The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
        Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
        Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.