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USGCRP News, Press Releases

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  • npat1@juno.com
    U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) News for 7 February 2004 http://globalchange.gov/#Climate-Network ... December 2, 2003 “No Doubt” Human
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 8, 2004
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      U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP)
      News for 7 February 2004
      http://globalchange.gov/#Climate-Network

      Press Releases:
      ------------------

      December 2, 2003
      �No Doubt� Human Activity Is Affecting Global Climate, Top Scientists BOULDER�Two of the nation�s premier atmospheric scientists, after reviewing extensive research by their colleagues, say there is no longer any doubt that human activities are having measurable�and increasing�impacts on global climate.
      http://www.ucar.edu/communications/newsreleases/2003/trenberth.html


      Dec. 4, 2003
      River Indicates Warmer Climate and Earlier Spring in Central Maine
      Note to Editors: The report, �Historical Trends in River Ice Thickness and Coherence in Hydroclimatological Trends in Maine,� is available..
      River Indicates Warmer Climate and Earlier Spring in Central Maine
      http://www.usgs.gov/public/press/public_affairs/press_releases/pr1819m.html


      January 05, 2004 - (date of web publication)
      El Nino-Related Fires Increase Greenhouse Gas Emissions
      http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/topstory/2004/0102firenino.html


      Jan. 13, 2004 � NOAA announced today that a new, high-tech climate monitoring network, designed to track the nation�s temperature and precipitation trends, is now operating in 28 states. New Climate Monitoring Network Now Operational
      http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2004/s2153.htm


      2 February 2004
      American Geophysical Union and
      Naval Research Laboratory Joint Release
      Increasing greenhouse gases lead to dramatic thinning of the upper atmosphere
      WASHINGTON - The highest layers of the Earth's atmosphere are cooling and contracting, most likely in response to increasing levels of greenhouse gases, according to a new study by scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This contraction could result in longer orbital lifetimes for both satellites and hazardous space debris.
      In a paper to be published February 5 in the Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, John Emmert, Michael Picone, Judith Lean, and Stephen Knowles report that the average density of the thermosphere has decreased by about 10 percent during the past 35 years. The thermosphere is the highest layer in the atmosphere, and begins at an altitude of about 90 kilometers [60 miles].
      http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/prrl0406.html


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      November 2003
      The ALE GAGE AGAGE Network
      Department of Energy Releases Updated Greenhouse Gas Database
      Data through March 2003 are now available for all five existing sites: Cape Grim, Tasmania; Point Matatula, American Samoa; Ragged Point, Barbados; Mace Head, Ireland; and Trinidad Head, California (stations also previously existed at Cape Meares, Oregon, and Adrigole, Ireland).
      U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). Data available here.
      http://cdiac.ornl.gov/ndps/alegage.html

      Pat


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