Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Fw: [CAD] Cities scramble to shield water

Expand Messages
  • npat1
    ... Cities scramble to shield water http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/local_news/epaper/2007/05/13/s1a_salty_0513.html By Stacey Singer Palm Beach
    Message 1 of 1 , May 13, 2007
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment


      ---------- Forwarded Message ----------
      Cities scramble to shield water
      http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/local_news/epaper/2007/05/13/s1a_salty_0513.html
      By Stacey Singer
      Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
      Sunday, May 13, 2007

      The most critical map in the water district's war room shows a solid 
      orange line stretching from Tequesta to Hallandale Beach, the leading 
      edge of an underground enemy that threatens coastal communities' 
      wells:
      Salt water.

      As water managers combat the drought, their top priority is defending 
      well fields east of that line from subterranean saltwater intrusion. 
      Ocean water is three times saltier than human blood, and it tastes 
      unpleasant. Drinking too much can lead to death. It corrodes pipes 
      and damages equipment. Once a well goes salty, it's useless.

      Well fields in Riviera Beach, Manalapan, Boynton Beach, Delray Beach, 
      Highland Beach and Boca Raton all sit inside or near the map's orange 
      saltwater-intrusion line. A wedge runs from the ocean into the porous 
      coastal rock, where it lurks beneath a layer of fresh water that 
      supplies the wells. A prolonged lack of rainfall increases the risk 
      that pumps will suck brine rather than fresh water.

      Of all Palm Beach County's coastal communities, Lake Worth and 
      Lantana face the biggest risk with well fields, water managers 
      believe.

      Mark Elsner has their names circled in red on his map. Elsner, in 
      charge of implementing the South Florida Water Management District's 
      water supply policy, says those communities lack back-up sources. To 
      the south, Broward County's Hillsboro Beach, Dania Beach and 
      Hallandale Beach face the same risk.

      To save these coastal well fields, the entire region conserves. 
      Lacking rain, golf courses turn patchy. Hibiscus hedges wilt. 
      Nurseries' business evaporates. Cars grow dingy. And homeowners 
      contemplate the cost of re-sodding.

      Every conservation effort helps, says Chip Merriam, deputy executive 
      director for the water district. At the district's headquarters, the 
      thermostat has been turned up to 80 degrees. Less energy required for 
      air conditioning means Florida Power & Light needs less water.

      Merriam's shirt sleeves are rolled up, his hair a bit damp from the 
      heat. Explaining his strategy to hold the orange line, he looks and 
      sounds like a battalion commander low on ammo.

      With almost no water available from Lake Okeechobee, his infantry has 
      shut off water to most of the region's tributary canals. Instead, 
      water is shunted to coastal canals. The fresh water acts like a 
      weight, providing pressure that, in theory, will keep the heavier 
      salt water pushed below the lighter fresh water that feeds the public 
      wells.

      "Normally we let canals carry water from the conservation area to 
      recharge the well heads," Merriam said. "Now we're trying to protect 
      those well heads."

      It's not an ideal strategy. It pulls down the water table in the 
      center part of the county, making the need to conserve regionwide 
      more intense.

      But it buys time for the wells most at risk.

      June typically brings Florida's rainy season. The long-range weather 
      forecast maps on Merriam's paper-strewn desk suggest it won't arrive 
      on time. So Merriam plans for the worst.

      Lantana highlights intrusion problem

      Salt readings in the production wells have not changed, but nearby 
      monitoring wells, which run deeper, have Merriam worried. He 
      recommended that some coastal wells be turned off for at least 60 
      days, while wells farther west carried their load.

      In Lantana's case, the back-up wells are just a few blocks from those 
      shut down.

      Jerry Darr is the soft-spoken director of Lantana's utility. A whiff 
      of incense and a soothing screen saver in his office are the only 
      signs that he's under stress. He has worked for the town for nearly 
      20 years. He knows his wells.

      "We're migrating our wells as far west as we can," he says. "We've 
      shut down wells 3, 4, 5 and 6."

      But in a town that's just 2 square miles, the remaining wells are 
      close to the coast, too.

      The district is watching Lantana closely, as the monitoring wells - 
      used only as a way to predict risk to the production wells - detect 
      rising chloride. One has a reading 17 times the allowable limit for 
      salts.

      Lantana officials think the information is bad. They are digging new 
      monitoring wells but hedging bets by digging new drinking water 
      wells, too, near Interstate 95.

      Historically, the orange line of underground salt water has pushed 
      past Lantana's new I-95 well, Elsner said. Lantana's other backup 
      plan, to open valves that link to Lake Worth's supply, doesn't offer 
      much comfort.

      "If you're a city with limited options and you're interconnecting 
      with another city with limited options, it's not the best situation," 
      Elsner said.

      In late 2008 or early 2009, Lake Worth will be in a better position, 
      assuming that concerns about nutrient-laden discharge near a coral 
      reef don't cause new delays. Lake Worth, like Jupiter, Manalapan and 
      Highland Beach, is building a reverse-osmosis plant that will strip 
      the chloride from the salty deep aquifer.

      Reverse osmosis-treated water tastes a bit different, lacking 
      minerals. Customers' bills have risen, too, but their supply isn't at 
      risk.

      Other communities - Riviera Beach, Boynton Beach, Delray Beach and 
      Boca Raton - have dug wells west of Military Trail, or tapped other 
      systems, so the loss of eastern wells won't create a crisis. They 
      wanted Lantana to do the same, but when town staffers explored the 
      possibility a few years ago, they found the $15 million cost more 
      than the town could afford.

      Using Everglades water considered

      So for now, the priority is to weigh down coastal canals with water. 
      The water district has asked the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to bend 
      its rules on taking water from the Everglades if the situation grows 
      worse.

      The proposal is getting a great deal of research and discussion, 
      engineers at the Jacksonville office say. The corps has asked the 
      district to draft a clear set of standards that would trigger 
      overriding Everglades protection rules.

      It will use sentinel monitoring wells, watching their depth and their 
      levels of salt. Also under study is how much of a release would do 
      the job.

      The agencies have conference calls every other day to hear where 
      things stand with the lake, the drinking water supply, the saltwater 
      incursion issue, and the health of the too-dry wetlands.

      Most birds' hatchlings have yet to fledge. Even that must be 
      considered, said John Zediak, chief of the corps' water management 
      section. "Many considerations must be weighed: flood control, water 
      supply irrigation, environment, saltwater intrusion," Zediak said. 
      "We are trying to continually manage in a way to balance those 
      considerations."

      Lately, the question of preserving the wells has taken precedence. 
      "That's where the need is," he said.

      This time last year, the concern was flood control: keeping the 
      Herbert Hoover dike around Lake Okeechobee safe from a hurricane. 
      Fresh water from the lake was sent out to sea to lower the lake and 
      reduce the risk of dike failure going into hurricane season.

      The storms didn't come, and now the lake is too low.

      "Mother Nature, she'll give us rain or she won't give us rain," 
      Zediak said. "I can't really tell you what the future is going to be. 
      I can try to manage the resource to the best of our ability."
      -- 
      <http://groundtruthinvestigations.com/>


      Temperature plots for many U.S. climate stations

      http://new.photos.yahoo.com/patneuman2000/albums

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.