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Re: Katrina’s Lesson in Energy

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    Neal Elliott (American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy) said: What Katrina has done is to snap the already tight market. The only viable option left
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 5, 2005
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      Neal Elliott (American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy)
      said: "What Katrina has done is to snap the already tight market.
      The only viable option left for consumers is to reduce demand."

      However,

      Robert Wilder (president of WilderShares which maintains WilderHill Clean Energy Index of clean energy stocks) said: "Don't put all of our eggs in the fossil fuel basket,".

      Most of the article is on what Robert Wilder says (newer and more technology). I think what Neal Elliott said (reducing energy demand) is more important to do - right now. The techology will or may come later, as market conditions allow.

      -- "janson2997" <janson1997@...> wrote:
      Katrina's Lesson in Energy

      Don't put all your eggs in one `fossil fuel basket.'
      October 10, 2005 Issue

      In addition to the ruins they left behind, Katrina's 150-mph winds
      blew the cover off a long-masked problem bedeviling the U.S.' energy
      infrastructure. Simply put, energy demand has exceeded the market's
      ability to deliver power.

      "The surging consumer demand has left the U.S. in an energy
      straightjacket with no supply options to switch to," says Neal
      Elliott, industrial program director at the American Council for an
      Energy-Efficient Economy. "What Katrina has done is to snap the
      already tight market. The only viable option left for consumers is to
      reduce demand."

      `The surging consumer demand has left the U.S. in an energy
      straightjacket. What Katrina has done is to snap the already tight
      market.'�Neal Elliott, The American Council for an Energy-Efficient
      Economy

      For those who have been preaching the gospel of diversity, Katrina
      was clear evidence that the U.S. must stop leaning so heavily on
      fossil fuels. Aside from power lines and power plants, the storm shut
      down oil pipelines and refineries, wiping out 12 percent of the U.S.
      refining capacity. At the pump, gasoline prices soared past $3.50 per
      gallon�still cheap by European standards, but jarring to U.S.
      consumers. "The lesson is, `Don't put all of our eggs in the fossil
      fuel basket,'" says Robert Wilder, president of WilderShares, which
      maintains the WilderHill Clean Energy Index of clean energy stocks.

      Oil refineries are producing full bore and still failing to meet
      demand, says Mr. Wilder. But while some are calling for more
      refineries, Mr. Wilder is among those who believe the answer is clean
      energy such as solar power, wind power, and fuel cells. Like a good
      stock portfolio, diversity could be the key to a stable energy
      portfolio, which could give both the power grid and the nation's fuel
      delivery system a better chance of surviving the next calamity to hit
      a major American city.

      A number of companies are hoping that the lure of independent energy
      will make customers see the light. Large companies include Sharp, BP
      Solar, Kyocera, and Shell Solar. Startups HelioVolt, Energy
      Innovations, Nanosolar, and Miasol� raised venture funding this
      summer, and SunPower in August announced it would raise $115 million
      in an initial public offering. Other promising solar companies
      include Red Herring 100 companies Konarka, Nanosys, Nanosolar, and
      Suntech Power.

      Still, solar power systems are not 100 percent storm-proof, and would
      only be as secure as your roof. But many roofs survived intact, and
      when the sun came out after the storm, those houses would have had
      power, says Mr. Wilder. Unlike oil, solar power is decentralized, so
      solar-powered homes in unaffected areas are not paying higher prices
      now. "Renewable energy in general would make us less dependent on
      oil, and Katrina took out oil," says Paul Maycock, president of PV
      Energy Systems. "The national impact could be lessened by a larger
      percentage of the U.S. electricity coming from photo-voltaic [solar
      power]."

      Other energy-related technologies that could have helped the Gulf
      Coast are available today, but are not yet widely used. For instance,
      grid-monitoring systems could help expedite repairs by pinpointing
      problems. Companies like State Estimator, EleQuant, and Electro
      Industries sell equipment that helps monitor the electric grid, a
      piece of America's infrastructure that teeters on the brink of
      disaster even when hurricanes are not bearing down on the coast
      (see "Patching the Power Grid").

      http://www.redherring.com/Article.aspx?a=14165&hed=Katrina%25e2%2580%
      2599s+Lesson+in+Energy#

      http://tinyurl.com/dvso9

      j2997
      http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/fuelcell-energy/
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