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Re: Animals 'hit by global warming'

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  • Mike Neuman
    Original Release: http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2005/051006b.htm Full Report: http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 7, 2005
      Original Release:
      http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2005/051006b.htm

      Full Report:
      http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-
      countryside/resprog/findings/climatechange-migratory/index.htm

      --- In ClimateArchive@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Neuman" <mtneuman@j...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Animals 'hit by global warming'
      > By Tim Hirsch
      > Environment Correspondent, BBC News
      >
      > Climate change could lead to the extinction of many animals
      including
      > migratory birds, says a report commissioned by the UK government.
      > Melting ice, spreading deserts and the impact of warm seas on the
      sex
      > of turtles are among threats identified.
      >
      > The report is being launched at a meeting of EU nature conservation
      > chiefs in Scotland.
      >
      > It says that warming has already changed the migration routes of
      some
      > birds and other animals.
      >
      > The UK's Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra)
      > commissioned the research, which was led by the British Trust for
      > Ornithology.
      >
      > The meeting, in the Scottish holiday resort of Aviemore, was called
      > to discuss ways in which wildlife might be helped to adapt to
      global
      > warming.
      >
      > Times already changing
      >
      > Scientists have already observed a wide range of changes in the
      > migration patterns of birds, fish and turtles, apparently in
      response
      > to warming which has already taken place.
      >
      > Some species normally associated with more southerly countries,
      such
      > as the little egret, the loggerhead turtle, and the red mullet, are
      > increasingly seen in and around the UK.
      >
      >
      > Wading birds such as the ringed plover are now spending the winter
      in
      > the east of Britain rather than on the west coast, and chiff-chaffs
      > are remaining in the UK throughout the year rather than migrating
      > south.
      > While many species have been able to adapt to new conditions simply
      > by moving their ranges further towards the poles, the study warns
      > that this option is not available to other animals, such as polar
      > bears and seals whose habitat is disappearing rapidly with the
      > melting of Arctic sea ice.
      >
      > Even subtle changes in sea temperature can have dramatic impacts on
      > wildlife with rapid depletion of the tiny plankton organisms which
      > form the base of the food web in the oceans.
      >
      > This is thought to have contributed to a recent drastic decline in
      > the breeding success of some Scottish seabirds, as the fish on
      which
      > they depend were suddenly deprived of food.
      >
      > Some of the other threats from climate change identified in the
      study
      > include:
      >
      > Increased storminess damaging the breeding colonies of albatross,
      > already facing heavy pressure from accidental capture on long-line
      > fishing hooks
      > Sea level rise destroying beach nesting sites for sea turtles - for
      > example, nearly a third of beaches used by turtles in the Caribbean
      > would be lost with the rise anticipated during this century, and
      > seals and wading birds also face destruction of their coastal
      > habitats
      > Warmer seas could lead to some turtle species becoming entirely
      > female, as water temperature strongly affects the sex ratio of
      > hatchlings
      > Growing water scarcity in many regions could further destroy the
      > wetland areas on which migrating waterfowl depend.
      > The spreading extent of the Sahara desert could threaten long-range
      > travellers such as the swallow, as they will be unable to "fuel up"
      > in previously fertile regions on the desert's edge.
      > "Our changing climate is already affecting a wide range of
      migratory
      > species," said Humphrey Crick from the British Trust for
      Ornithology,
      > one of the report's authors.
      > "They range from the swallow crossing the Sahara to the albatrosses
      > of the southern oceans; but this report shows that the potential
      > impacts are really widespread.
      >
      > "There is some scope for helping species adapt to climate change,
      but
      > we need to find global solutions to help animals that swim, fly and
      > walk thousands of miles each year."
      >
      > Too far, too fast
      >
      >
      > Nature has always had to adapt to changing climate conditions.
      > Indeed, it is one of the driving forces behind the process of
      > evolution which has produced the staggering variety of life on
      Earth.
      >
      > But the fear is that the changes currently under way are simply too
      > rapid for species to evolve new strategies for survival.
      >
      > Their options are also being narrowed by the rapid conversion of
      > ecosystems such as the draining of wetlands, felling of forests and
      > development of coastlines - so if their existing habitats are hit
      by
      > global warming, there is literally no place to go.
      >
      > The report has important messages for conservation officials
      gathered
      > in Scotland for this meeting convened by Defra.
      >
      > They are being urged to make more use of "biological corridors" to
      > widen the options available to migrating species as climate change
      > takes hold.
      >
      > The whole approach to conservation may have to be radically
      changed -
      > the most perfectly-protected nature reserve could end up being of
      > little use if the animals breeding there face starvation because
      they
      > have nowhere to migrate.
      >
      >
      > Story from BBC NEWS:
      > http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/4313726.stm
      > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4313726.stm
      >
      > Published: 2005/10/05 23:03:43 GMT
      >
      > © BBC MMV
      >
    • Mike Neuman
      EU s Policy-makers Told to Help Wildlife Adapt to Climate Change NOW: http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2005/051006c.htm ... ... conservation ...
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 7, 2005
        EU's Policy-makers Told to Help Wildlife Adapt to Climate Change NOW:
        http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2005/051006c.htm

        --- In ClimateArchive@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Neuman" <mtneuman@j...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Original Release:
        > http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2005/051006b.htm
        >
        > Full Report:
        > http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-
        > countryside/resprog/findings/climatechange-migratory/index.htm
        >
        > --- In ClimateArchive@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Neuman"
        <mtneuman@j...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Animals 'hit by global warming'
        > > By Tim Hirsch
        > > Environment Correspondent, BBC News
        > >
        > > Climate change could lead to the extinction of many animals
        > including
        > > migratory birds, says a report commissioned by the UK government.
        > > Melting ice, spreading deserts and the impact of warm seas on the
        > sex
        > > of turtles are among threats identified.
        > >
        > > The report is being launched at a meeting of EU nature
        conservation
        > > chiefs in Scotland.
        > >
        > > It says that warming has already changed the migration routes of
        > some
        > > birds and other animals.
        > >
        > > The UK's Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
        (Defra)
        > > commissioned the research, which was led by the British Trust for
        > > Ornithology.
        > >
        > > The meeting, in the Scottish holiday resort of Aviemore, was
        called
        > > to discuss ways in which wildlife might be helped to adapt to
        > global
        > > warming.
        > >
        > > Times already changing
        > >
        > > Scientists have already observed a wide range of changes in the
        > > migration patterns of birds, fish and turtles, apparently in
        > response
        > > to warming which has already taken place.
        > >
        > > Some species normally associated with more southerly countries,
        > such
        > > as the little egret, the loggerhead turtle, and the red mullet,
        are
        > > increasingly seen in and around the UK.
        > >
        > >
        > > Wading birds such as the ringed plover are now spending the
        winter
        > in
        > > the east of Britain rather than on the west coast, and chiff-
        chaffs
        > > are remaining in the UK throughout the year rather than migrating
        > > south.
        > > While many species have been able to adapt to new conditions
        simply
        > > by moving their ranges further towards the poles, the study warns
        > > that this option is not available to other animals, such as polar
        > > bears and seals whose habitat is disappearing rapidly with the
        > > melting of Arctic sea ice.
        > >
        > > Even subtle changes in sea temperature can have dramatic impacts
        on
        > > wildlife with rapid depletion of the tiny plankton organisms
        which
        > > form the base of the food web in the oceans.
        > >
        > > This is thought to have contributed to a recent drastic decline
        in
        > > the breeding success of some Scottish seabirds, as the fish on
        > which
        > > they depend were suddenly deprived of food.
        > >
        > > Some of the other threats from climate change identified in the
        > study
        > > include:
        > >
        > > Increased storminess damaging the breeding colonies of albatross,
        > > already facing heavy pressure from accidental capture on long-
        line
        > > fishing hooks
        > > Sea level rise destroying beach nesting sites for sea turtles -
        for
        > > example, nearly a third of beaches used by turtles in the
        Caribbean
        > > would be lost with the rise anticipated during this century, and
        > > seals and wading birds also face destruction of their coastal
        > > habitats
        > > Warmer seas could lead to some turtle species becoming entirely
        > > female, as water temperature strongly affects the sex ratio of
        > > hatchlings
        > > Growing water scarcity in many regions could further destroy the
        > > wetland areas on which migrating waterfowl depend.
        > > The spreading extent of the Sahara desert could threaten long-
        range
        > > travellers such as the swallow, as they will be unable to "fuel
        up"
        > > in previously fertile regions on the desert's edge.
        > > "Our changing climate is already affecting a wide range of
        > migratory
        > > species," said Humphrey Crick from the British Trust for
        > Ornithology,
        > > one of the report's authors.
        > > "They range from the swallow crossing the Sahara to the
        albatrosses
        > > of the southern oceans; but this report shows that the potential
        > > impacts are really widespread.
        > >
        > > "There is some scope for helping species adapt to climate change,
        > but
        > > we need to find global solutions to help animals that swim, fly
        and
        > > walk thousands of miles each year."
        > >
        > > Too far, too fast
        > >
        > >
        > > Nature has always had to adapt to changing climate conditions.
        > > Indeed, it is one of the driving forces behind the process of
        > > evolution which has produced the staggering variety of life on
        > Earth.
        > >
        > > But the fear is that the changes currently under way are simply
        too
        > > rapid for species to evolve new strategies for survival.
        > >
        > > Their options are also being narrowed by the rapid conversion of
        > > ecosystems such as the draining of wetlands, felling of forests
        and
        > > development of coastlines - so if their existing habitats are hit
        > by
        > > global warming, there is literally no place to go.
        > >
        > > The report has important messages for conservation officials
        > gathered
        > > in Scotland for this meeting convened by Defra.
        > >
        > > They are being urged to make more use of "biological corridors"
        to
        > > widen the options available to migrating species as climate
        change
        > > takes hold.
        > >
        > > The whole approach to conservation may have to be radically
        > changed -
        > > the most perfectly-protected nature reserve could end up being of
        > > little use if the animals breeding there face starvation because
        > they
        > > have nowhere to migrate.
        > >
        > >
        > > Story from BBC NEWS:
        > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/4313726.stm
        > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4313726.stm
        > >
        > > Published: 2005/10/05 23:03:43 GMT
        > >
        > > © BBC MMV
        > >
        >
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