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My remarks on "Strange Bedfellows" at realclimate.org

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  • Pat Neuman
    My comments sent this evening to: http://www.realclimate.org/ Re: Strange Bedfellows Are scientists paying enough attention to global warming adding to the
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 9, 2005
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      My comments sent this evening to:
      http://www.realclimate.org/
      Re: Strange Bedfellows

      Are scientists paying enough attention to global warming adding to the
      destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer? Could that destruction
      be more severe to Earth's biota than temperature change? How important
      was the loss of ozone in contributing to extinctions in Earth's past?

      Excerpt: "Scientists Studying Wintry Ice in Summer Clouds"
      ... Because of their high altitude, ice clouds touch the tropopause,
      the region between the troposphere (the atmospheric layer closest to
      Earth) and the stratosphere. When the rising air on a summer day is
      hot enough, it can move fast enough where it "punches through" the
      tropopause and into the stratosphere. This "overshooting cloud top"
      brings water vapor into that layer of the upper atmosphere, where it
      contributes to destroying the "good ozone" that protects us from the
      Sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. ...
      http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/science/ice_crystals.html

      Also:
      http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/ozone.htm

      Pat N
    • Pat Neuman
      Excerpt comments on Strange Bedfellows http://www.realclimate.org ... Comment 24 by Grundt — 11 Feb 2005 Re 17. Thank you for the links. Yes, I remember
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 13, 2005
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        Excerpt comments on "Strange Bedfellows"

        http://www.realclimate.org

        ----------------------------------
        Comment 24 by Grundt — 11 Feb 2005

        Re 17. Thank you for the links.

        Yes, I remember reading in 1998 and later about feedback Global
        Warming-Ozone destruction. Personally I think that what you suggest:
        --" Could that destruction be more severe to Earth's biota than
        temperature change? " -- needs far more attention from Scientific
        community.

        Biological adaptation to harmful UV is, it seems, a lot more difficult
        than adaptation to Temperature changes alone, (not taking in account
        radiative effects, which I understand are forcing factors in Climate
        terms)

        Of course, Global Warming carries within a Pandora box. The
        concomitant events for temperature changes are a furious beast, as a
        renowned scientist, pointed reffering to playing with Climate .

        Which is more important today...?

        Comment 24. by Grundt — 11 Feb 2005
        ----------------------------------

        -----------------------
        Response to comment 17.

        [Response: the idea that GW could make OD worse *is* studied - though
        the mechanism I know of is different. It is: GW will cool the
        stratosphere. A colder stratosphere can support more polar
        stratospheric clouds (there is a temperature threshold for their
        formation), and PSC's are a vital part of OD. At the moment, the
        Antarctic strat is colder than the Arctic, hence most OD there. But
        people study whether the Arctic might cool enough to develope proper
        ozone holes of its own. Its a balance, I think, between GW (or
        cooling, in the strat) and the slow decline of ozone-depleting
        chemicals - William]
        --------------------


        --------------------
        > Comment 17. by Pat Neuman, Hydrologist
        > at http://www.realclimate.org
        > My comments sent this evening to:
        > http://www.realclimate.org/
        > Re: Strange Bedfellows
        >
        > 9 Feb 2005
        >
        > Are scientists paying enough attention to
        > global warming adding to the destruction of
        > the stratospheric ozone layer? Could that
        > destruction be more severe to Earth's biota
        > than temperature change? How important
        > was the loss of ozone in contributing to
        > extinctions in Earth's past?
        >
        > Excerpt:
        >
        > "Scientists Studying Wintry Ice in Summer Clouds"
        > ... Because of their high altitude, ice clouds
        > touch the tropopause, the region between the
        > troposphere (the atmospheric layer closest to
        > Earth) and the stratosphere. When the rising air
        > on a summer day is hot enough, it can move fast
        > enough where it "punches through" the tropopause
        > and into the stratosphere. This "overshooting
        > cloud top" brings water vapor into that layer
        > of the upper atmosphere, where it contributes to
        > destroying the "good ozone" that protects us
        > from the Sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. ...
        http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/science/ice_crystals.html
        >
        > Also:
        > http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/ozone.htm

        ------------------------
        >
        > Pat N
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