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Reclaiming Clapp Cemetery

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  • John Mallory Land
    Kemis and all, I had an idea. Perhaps someone has already broached this angle, and if so, please forgive the redundancy. The information compiled by Buster W.
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 28, 2002
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      Kemis and all,

      I had an idea. Perhaps someone has already broached this angle, and if
      so, please forgive the redundancy.

      The information compiled by Buster W. WRIGHT indicates that William PAGE
      buried in the Clapp Cemetery not only was a Confederate serviceman, but
      evidently died in the line of service. My research suggests that James
      NEWSOME who is buried there was a veteran of the Civil War (served in
      Co. G, 20th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, CSA, with his brother George
      Washington Freeman NEWSOME).

      Five of my eight gg-grandfathers, as well as many of their brothers,
      cousins, uncles, nephews, etc., fought in the Civil War, and to a man,
      they fought for the South. I want to say up front that although I
      embrace my Southern heritage, I am no fan of the Confederacy or its
      idealogy. I have seen monuments throughout the South, including here in
      Texas, commemorating the Confederate fallen from this community or that
      community. It is said by some in defense of these monuments that they
      are meant to honor the men's sacrifice and dedication to their beliefs,
      not to revere the Confederate ideal. I say: if you want to honor men
      for their bravery in the defense of their beliefs and their communities
      in this conflict, put up monuments commemorating ALL the men who fought
      in the Civil War, not just the Confederates. On an individual basis,
      however, I feel it is appropriate to honor these men who died fighting
      for a cause they believed in and, as they saw it, to defend their
      families and communities. And they are, after all, my kinsmen.

      One of my gg-gf's on my maternal grandmother's side, James Marion
      SIZEMORE, served in the CSA. Some years ago, a cousin noticed that
      James did not have a military grave marker and found out about a program
      whereby some entity (I believe it was the U.S. government, although I
      may have this wrong) would provide a grave marker and conduct a military
      service for any veteran (even Confederate) who had not received one.
      The service was conducted in about 1977 and a military marker was
      placed where James is buried in a private cemetery on the Ft. Benning
      Reservation. That cousin is now deceased, but I have another cousin on
      that side who is very active in the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
      Perhaps we could get the local chapter interested in pursuing the
      placement of markers for these two men. I know at this point we don't
      know specifically where in the cemetery the individuals are buried (and
      perhaps may never know). However, perhaps there could be memorial
      stones placed that are not necessarily grave markers.

      Because William PAGE, James NEWSOME, Mary/Martha NEWSOME, and Penelope
      NEWSOME are my kin (collateral ancestors), I would like to see that some
      kind of marker is placed at the cemetery for each of them. The UDC
      might be a place to start. I don't want to create any racial tension
      within the project, and I certainly want to see that the other
      individuals buired at the site and the groups they represent receive
      their due recognition. Does anyone have any thoughts on this matter?

      Also, has a fund been set up to which interested parties my contribute
      toward the project?

      Another thought I have had is: what if we could get an archealogy or
      anthropology department at a school (like University of Columbus) to
      take on a project of studying the cemetery site? Perhaps a physical
      survey could tell us more about how the cemetery was laid out, where
      graves are located, what evidence there is of past improvements. There
      may be grave markers, or pieces of them, buried at the site, some of
      which might yield some information about some of the individuals buried
      there. Five acres is a lot of area, and if the data on the Buster
      WRIGHT list are accurate, the range of time when burials took place is
      at least 1856-1904 (not including possible Native American burials in
      the area). There are potentially a lot of folk buried at this place.

      When U.S. Highway 75 was expanded here in Dallas a few years ago, it was
      discovered that the road had originally been put through over a
      cemetery. It turned out that a city park called "Freemen" next to the
      service road was actually an old slave cemetery that had continued to be
      used by the African-American community north of what was then Dallas
      until the highway was cut across the neighborhood in 1947. Researchers
      found little remaining evidence, other than some Bible records and the
      memories of a few very old citizens, to tell who is buried there, but a
      preservation group launched a study of the park and vicinity. Much was
      learned about the cemetery and about the folks' way of life, burial
      rituals and practices at the time and so forth. We'll never know who
      all is buried there, but a nice monument was erected to commenorate
      their memory and to try to rectify the desecration of the cemetery.

      What are anyone's thoughts about pursuing such an avenue of
      investigation with regard to the Clapp Cemetery?

      Any input appreciated,

      John in TX
    • Kemis Massey
      Hi all, The SCV has been contacted and is included in our emails. I m too new at this to say exactly how they help and will have wait until I know what they
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 29, 2002
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        Hi all,

        The SCV has been contacted and is included in our emails. I'm too new at this to say exactly how they help and will have wait until I know what they do. I can honestly say, once the cemetery is cleaned and the graves identified, there will be a ceremony for all of the Civil War soldiers. Honestly the mention of the Civil War soldiers is what grabbed my attention to the Clapp Cemetery. The American Indians were the next attention grabber - I've been told all my life that I was Indian and Irish. . . haven't found either yet. I know from pictures that I saw as a child, there is Indian in my family.

        Give me a little time on getting what you've sent on line. The pictures and the info are great. Like you I think the pictures will add a personal touch to cemetery, put a face to cause.

        kemis


        From: John Mallory Land
        Kemis and all,

        I had an idea. Perhaps someone has already broached this angle, and if
        so, please forgive the redundancy.

        The information compiled by Buster W. WRIGHT indicates that William PAGE
        buried in the Clapp Cemetery not only was a Confederate serviceman, but
        evidently died in the line of service. My research suggests that James
        NEWSOME who is buried there was a veteran of the Civil War (served in
        Co. G, 20th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, CSA, with his brother George
        Washington Freeman NEWSOME).

        Five of my eight gg-grandfathers, as well as many of their brothers,
        cousins, uncles, nephews, etc., fought in the Civil War, and to a man,
        they fought for the South. I want to say up front that although I
        embrace my Southern heritage, I am no fan of the Confederacy or its
        idealogy. I have seen monuments throughout the South, including here in
        Texas, commemorating the Confederate fallen from this community or that
        community. It is said by some in defense of these monuments that they
        are meant to honor the men's sacrifice and dedication to their beliefs,
        not to revere the Confederate ideal. I say: if you want to honor men
        for their bravery in the defense of their beliefs and their communities
        in this conflict, put up monuments commemorating ALL the men who fought
        in the Civil War, not just the Confederates. On an individual basis,
        however, I feel it is appropriate to honor these men who died fighting
        for a cause they believed in and, as they saw it, to defend their
        families and communities. And they are, after all, my kinsmen.

        One of my gg-gf's on my maternal grandmother's side, James Marion
        SIZEMORE, served in the CSA. Some years ago, a cousin noticed that
        James did not have a military grave marker and found out about a program
        whereby some entity (I believe it was the U.S. government, although I
        may have this wrong) would provide a grave marker and conduct a military
        service for any veteran (even Confederate) who had not received one.
        The service was conducted in about 1977 and a military marker was
        placed where James is buried in a private cemetery on the Ft. Benning
        Reservation. That cousin is now deceased, but I have another cousin on
        that side who is very active in the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
        Perhaps we could get the local chapter interested in pursuing the
        placement of markers for these two men. I know at this point we don't
        know specifically where in the cemetery the individuals are buried (and
        perhaps may never know). However, perhaps there could be memorial
        stones placed that are not necessarily grave markers.

        Because William PAGE, James NEWSOME, Mary/Martha NEWSOME, and Penelope
        NEWSOME are my kin (collateral ancestors), I would like to see that some
        kind of marker is placed at the cemetery for each of them. The UDC
        might be a place to start. I don't want to create any racial tension
        within the project, and I certainly want to see that the other
        individuals buired at the site and the groups they represent receive
        their due recognition. Does anyone have any thoughts on this matter?

        Also, has a fund been set up to which interested parties my contribute
        toward the project?

        Another thought I have had is: what if we could get an archealogy or
        anthropology department at a school (like University of Columbus) to
        take on a project of studying the cemetery site? Perhaps a physical
        survey could tell us more about how the cemetery was laid out, where
        graves are located, what evidence there is of past improvements. There
        may be grave markers, or pieces of them, buried at the site, some of
        which might yield some information about some of the individuals buried
        there. Five acres is a lot of area, and if the data on the Buster
        WRIGHT list are accurate, the range of time when burials took place is
        at least 1856-1904 (not including possible Native American burials in
        the area). There are potentially a lot of folk buried at this place.

        When U.S. Highway 75 was expanded here in Dallas a few years ago, it was
        discovered that the road had originally been put through over a
        cemetery. It turned out that a city park called "Freemen" next to the
        service road was actually an old slave cemetery that had continued to be
        used by the African-American community north of what was then Dallas
        until the highway was cut across the neighborhood in 1947. Researchers
        found little remaining evidence, other than some Bible records and the
        memories of a few very old citizens, to tell who is buried there, but a
        preservation group launched a study of the park and vicinity. Much was
        learned about the cemetery and about the folks' way of life, burial
        rituals and practices at the time and so forth. We'll never know who
        all is buried there, but a nice monument was erected to commenorate
        their memory and to try to rectify the desecration of the cemetery.

        What are anyone's thoughts about pursuing such an avenue of
        investigation with regard to the Clapp Cemetery?

        Any input appreciated,

        John in TX





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      • mflp@aol.com
        In a message dated 8/29/02 9:15:23 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Our Hiram Parks Bell Camp of the SCV does a lot of good work in Forsyth County. They have
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 29, 2002
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          In a message dated 8/29/02 9:15:23 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
          sobby@... writes:
          > The SCV has been contacted and is included in our emails.

          Our Hiram Parks Bell Camp of the SCV does a lot of good work in Forsyth
          County. They have work days to clean old cemeteries and have worked with the
          Historical Society to clean up around houses that are going into the
          "Historic homes for sale" program. Some of their members are also members of
          the Historical Society.

          I too have gg grandparents that fought in the civil War. I expect most of us
          do except on the lines that immigrated after the civil war.
          I know Grandpa Sam's father is buried in the Union Military cemetery in TN
          and his wife Grandma Martha's father was lost at Vicksburg on the
          Confederate side.

          If you go back further I have ggg grandparents that fought on both sides of
          the Revolutionary War - one was a paid German Hessian soldier who jumped ship
          and stayed in Canada after the War.

          Of course I have my Indian ancestors who I assume met some of the ships that
          came and either killed them or befriended them and one of my Dad's ancestors
          was on the ship Anne - I believe it was - that came with the Mayflower. Her
          Dad was William Brewster who was on the Mayflower.

          I think the important thing is to let anyone celebrate that part of American
          History that interests them. It is just important that we do keep honoring
          our history and that we respect the rights of the dead as to their final
          resting place.

          Donna Parrish
        • John Mallory Land
          ... I agree whole-heartedly. I didn t mention in my previous message, but I also have Native American ancestry in addition to an amalgam of European roots
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 30, 2002
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            > Donna Parrish writes:
            >
            > I think the important thing is to let anyone celebrate that part of
            > American
            > History that interests them. It is just important that we do keep
            > honoring
            > our history and that we respect the rights of the dead as to their final
            > resting place.
            >
            I agree whole-heartedly. I didn't mention in my previous message, but I
            also have Native American ancestry in addition to an amalgam of European
            roots (English, Welsh, Scotch, Irish, French, Prussian/German, and
            Italian, that I know of). I have not yet been able to determine the
            specific tribe or nation from which my Native American ancestor(s) hail,
            but hope to learn more about this side of my background. I concur that
            everyone at Clapp Cemetery deserves to be remembered and honored, and
            the effort to restore the cemetery is highly commendable.

            John
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