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Re: [Churchcrawling] Longstowe St Mary Part one [8 Attachments]

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  • marion
    It does look hideous inside. I thought at first you d added the wrong external image, as the outside looks bog standard. I ve looked its history up on the net
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2012
      It does look hideous inside. I thought at first you'd added the wrong external image, as the outside looks bog standard. I've looked its history up on the net and it's been checkered to say the least, including an almost total collapse not too long after Ralph Bovey's monument was erected. The Victorian version was paid for by a vicar and his wife when it was again in a really bad state. Interesting to look at, thanks. I rather like the Bovey monument for being 'different'. I see Cameron commented on it here in 2004. Marion

      On 31 Aug 2012, at 22:16, Chris Stafford wrote:

      >
      >
      > Longstowe St Mary
      >
      > The church, virtually a new build by local man, W M Fawcett, (except the tower, 14th C) is an unremarkable building, from the S just a tower, nave and chancel, only the porch seems to catch the eye with its frightening polychromatic brickwork, hinting at what lies within. The church was locked, there were two keyholder numbers listed, as I was standing outside preparing to ring, a group of people walked up, a friendly lady asked if I would like to see inside, well I gave an immediate positive reply and she unlocked the church by punching in the four digit code into the time locking device on the S door, apparently it is open on weekends between 10am and 5pm, all done by a large magnetic lock.
      >
      > The interior is a riot of Victorian brickwork, red and blue brick jostle for primacy along with creamy Ancaster stone, complete with odd simple primitive stencils on large pieces of the stonework. It’s all positively ghastly, Fawcett is given a bad press by Pevsner in the Cambridge book and looking around I can see why. It lacks the lightness of touch that Billy Buggerfield would have done, it lacks any display of authenticity that Gee Gee would have given it, just a cheap job by a talentless local chappie. This opinion is given extra credence when I wander into the N transept where I am confronted with the remarkable site of an early 17th C tomb chest, surmounted by a incredible 1673 tablet, featuring a chap emerging naked from the sea and grabbing an anchor extending from above complete with the hand of god! Woww, but why, oh why, put these two monuments, presumably from the old church, one on top of the other. Indeed it gets worse, whilst Anthony Cage looks at least comfortable looking up at the Poseidon figure, his poor diminutive Dot of a wife is shoehorned into looking up at the very base of the above monument, a most uncomfortable juxtaposition. Whilst I found the church not too pleasing on the eye I must admit that I did find it fun to photograph and was most pleased with the portfolio from here, at full resolution there are some stunning pictures here, sorry about the half dozen HDR's.
    • KENNETH PAVER
      you ve certainly gone through your language repertoire here. ________________________________ From: Chris Stafford To:
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 1, 2012
        you've certainly gone through your language repertoire here.


        From: Chris Stafford <h12wcc@...>
        To: "churchpictures@yahoogroups.com" <churchpictures@yahoogroups.com>; "churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com" <churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, 31 August 2012, 22:16
        Subject: [Churchcrawling] Longstowe St Mary Part one [8 Attachments]

         
        Longstowe St Mary
         
        The church, virtually a new build by local man, W M Fawcett, (except the tower, 14th C) is an unremarkable building, from the S just a tower, nave and chancel, only the porch seems to catch the eye with its frightening polychromatic brickwork, hinting at what lies within. The church was locked, there were two keyholder numbers listed, as I was standing outside preparing to ring, a group of people walked up, a friendly lady asked if I would like to see inside, well I gave an immediate positive reply and she unlocked the church by punching in the four digit code into the time locking device on the S door, apparently it is open on weekends between 10am and 5pm, all done by a large magnetic lock.
         
        The interior is a riot of Victorian brickwork, red and blue brick jostle for primacy along with creamy Ancaster stone, complete with odd simple primitive stencils on large pieces of the stonework. It’s all positively ghastly, Fawcett is given a bad press by Pevsner in the Cambridge book and looking around I can see why. It lacks the lightness of touch that Billy Buggerfield would have done, it lacks any display of authenticity that Gee Gee would have given it, just a cheap job by a talentless local chappie. This opinion is given extra credence when I wander into the N transept where I am confronted with the remarkable site of an early 17th C tomb chest, surmounted by a incredible 1673 tablet, featuring a chap emerging naked from the sea and grabbing an anchor extending from above complete with the hand of god! Woww, but why, oh why, put these two monuments, presumably from the old church, one on top of the other. Indeed it gets worse, whilst Anthony Cage looks at least comfortable looking up at the Poseidon figure, his poor diminutive Dot of a wife is shoehorned into looking up at the very base of the above monument, a most uncomfortable juxtaposition. Whilst I found the church not too pleasing on the eye I must admit that I did find it fun to photograph and was most pleased with the portfolio from here, at full resolution there are some stunning pictures here, sorry about the half dozen HDR's.


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