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Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Cherington, Warwickshire

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  • marion
    Interesting and slightly ironic as there are at least two small extra-vibrant Piper-Reyntiens windows round here (Bucks) which are real eye-stoppers, but a
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2011
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      Interesting and slightly ironic as there are at least two small "extra-vibrant" Piper-Reyntiens windows round here (Bucks) which are real eye-stoppers, but a super one in Bledlow Ridge church - not restrained either, but one which makes the otherwise dull 19th century building glow. I think he lived near Henley.

      Marion

      On 30 Jun 2011, at 23:41, aidan.mcraethomson wrote:

      > Thanks Marion, I could only really scrath the surface with this one.
      >
      > As for the book it's an interesting read, subjective of course, but a compelling, if controversial argument. Piper discusses at length the role of the artist in the stained glass world, advocating a stronger role for fine artists designing in the medium (as happened in France) as opposed to designers coming entirely from within the craft, thereby expanding the medium's potential (there are so many mass produced windows where the role of the artisan is significanly more apparent than the artist, Piper saught to redress that balance). He also makes a plea for restraint and greater sensitivity to the setting, in a nutshell, how stained glass, being an architectural artform, can make or break the space it sits in. It's been many years since I read it as a student, but I found it quite thought provoking at the time.
      >
      > --- In Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com, marion <marion.e.hall44@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Fabulous examples. I'm intrigued by the title of John Piper's book; how can stained glass be anti-art, I wonder.
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Don't forget to Email URLs of websites to members that you have found and think are worthy of recommendation. Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • aidan.mcraethomson
      Yes I know the one but haven t seen it in the flesh so to speak but would love to (had the painful experience last year of being in a group driven right past
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 2, 2011
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        Yes I know the one but haven't seen it in the flesh so to speak but would love to (had the painful experience last year of being in a group driven right past Bledlow Ridge church to look at Radnage instead, which was (unusually) locked!).

        Yes Piper/Reyntiens's work does tend to stand out! He was capable of sensitive moments; at Sandford St Martin (Oxon) he declined the request to replace the Victorian east window and opted for a much smaller north aisle window instead, and at St Margaret's, Westminster his entire scheme of 8 abstract windows in neutral tones is designed to be subordinate to the rich 16th century glass of the east window (though perhaps budget must have also played a small part ;-)

        --- In Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com, marion <marion.e.hall44@...> wrote:
        >
        > Interesting and slightly ironic as there are at least two small "extra-vibrant" Piper-Reyntiens windows round here (Bucks) which are real eye-stoppers, but a super one in Bledlow Ridge church - not restrained either, but one which makes the otherwise dull 19th century building glow. I think he lived near Henley.
        >
        > Marion
        >
        > On 30 Jun 2011, at 23:41, aidan.mcraethomson wrote:
        >
        > > Thanks Marion, I could only really scrath the surface with this one.
        > >
        > > As for the book it's an interesting read, subjective of course, but a compelling, if controversial argument. Piper discusses at length the role of the artist in the stained glass world, advocating a stronger role for fine artists designing in the medium (as happened in France) as opposed to designers coming entirely from within the craft, thereby expanding the medium's potential (there are so many mass produced windows where the role of the artisan is significanly more apparent than the artist, Piper saught to redress that balance). He also makes a plea for restraint and greater sensitivity to the setting, in a nutshell, how stained glass, being an architectural artform, can make or break the space it sits in. It's been many years since I read it as a student, but I found it quite thought provoking at the time.
        > >
        > > --- In Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com, marion <marion.e.hall44@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> Fabulous examples. I'm intrigued by the title of John Piper's book; how can stained glass be anti-art, I wonder.
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Don't forget to Email URLs of websites to members that you have found and think are worthy of recommendation. Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • marion
        ... I ll send the Bledlow Ridge window, I don t save many pics but I have saved this one as I love it. Very unusual for Radnage to be closed indeed. ...
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 2, 2011
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          On 2 Jul 2011, at 09:31, aidan.mcraethomson wrote:

          > Yes I know the one but haven't seen it in the flesh so to speak but would love to (had the painful experience last year of being in a group driven right past Bledlow Ridge church to look at Radnage instead, which was (unusually) locked!).

          I'll send the Bledlow Ridge window, I don't save many pics but I have saved this one as I love it. Very unusual for Radnage to be closed indeed.


          >
          > Yes Piper/Reyntiens's work does tend to stand out!

          There's a humdinger in Hambleden, Bucks, which must've been fairly near to where he lived, I would think.


          > He was capable of sensitive moments; at Sandford St Martin (Oxon) he declined the request to replace the Victorian east window and opted for a much smaller north aisle window instead, and at St Margaret's, Westminster his entire scheme of 8 abstract windows in neutral tones is designed to be subordinate to the rich 16th century glass of the east window (though perhaps budget must have also played a small part ;-)
          >
          > --- In Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com, marion <marion.e.hall44@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Interesting and slightly ironic as there are at least two small "extra-vibrant" Piper-Reyntiens windows round here (Bucks) which are real eye-stoppers, but a super one in Bledlow Ridge church - not restrained either, but one which makes the otherwise dull 19th century building glow. I think he lived near Henley.
          >>
          >> Marion
          >>
          >> On 30 Jun 2011, at 23:41, aidan.mcraethomson wrote:
          >>
          >>> Thanks Marion, I could only really scrath the surface with this one.
          >>>
          >>> As for the book it's an interesting read, subjective of course, but a compelling, if controversial argument. Piper discusses at length the role of the artist in the stained glass world, advocating a stronger role for fine artists designing in the medium (as happened in France) as opposed to designers coming entirely from within the craft, thereby expanding the medium's potential (there are so many mass produced windows where the role of the artisan is significanly more apparent than the artist, Piper saught to redress that balance). He also makes a plea for restraint and greater sensitivity to the setting, in a nutshell, how stained glass, being an architectural artform, can make or break the space it sits in. It's been many years since I read it as a student, but I found it quite thought provoking at the time.
          >>>
          >>> --- In Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com, marion <marion.e.hall44@> wrote:
          >>>>
          >>>> Fabulous examples. I'm intrigued by the title of John Piper's book; how can stained glass be anti-art, I wonder.
          >>>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> ------------------------------------
          >>>
          >>> Don't forget to Email URLs of websites to members that you have found and think are worthy of recommendation. Yahoo! Groups Links
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Don't forget to Email URLs of websites to members that you have found and think are worthy of recommendation. Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
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