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Re: Holy Trinity, Pontargothi /Stansell of Taunton

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  • marion
    I ve contacted Somerset County Library, Richard, and have learned that Mr A. Stansell came from a family of builders, painters, glaziers and plumbers. His
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2007
      I've contacted Somerset County Library, Richard, and have learned that
      Mr A. Stansell came from a family of builders, painters, glaziers and
      plumbers. His father, William, was born in 1823 in Westminster and
      moved south west. His son Alfred joined the firm in 1840 and
      specialised in glass, stained and heraldic, painting (and plumbing);
      his styles were described as 'gothic' and 'arabesque' - interesting in
      view of Chris's response to the interior design of Pontargothi. He
      extended his work in interior design to Ireland and France, and
      decorated country houses. The firm Stansell of Taunton still exists and
      had done some work on the Somerset Country Library building; it has
      also endowed an art gallery in Taunton. Oh, and has done restoration
      work on Wells Cathedral.
      Marion

      On 30 Apr 2007, at 23:12, RICHARD CAMP wrote:

      > Like Llanfair Kilgeddin, a church deep in rural Wales, with a complete
      > set of murals covering almost every inch of wall, looking foreign.
      > Does anyone know about Mr A. Stansell of Taunton who did the
      > Pontargothi murals? Like Llanfair K, also expertly restored last year
      > thanks to CADW and other grants...
    • RICHARD CAMP
      Brilliant research, Marion - thank you. I wonder if Stansell came to work for Mr Bath in mid-Wales on the recommendation of his fellow high
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1, 2007
        Brilliant research, Marion - thank you. I wonder if Stansell came to work for Mr Bath in mid-Wales on the recommendation of his fellow high churchman/shipowner, William Gibbs of Tyntesfield and Devon, to whom he erected a memorial in Pontargothi church? The architect, Benjamin Bucknall, left Britain to live and work and die in Algiers before the church was finished: perhaps he was a much-travelled man who had indeed seen buildings of different cultures.
        Many thanks also for all your excellent pictures of your Welsh tours; we went on to Talley Abbey after seeing you: another magical spot, by the lake in evening light. Good that you proceeded up the lane from Pontargothi despite Margaret Mansell's prediction that you would just end up in a farmyard.
        Best wishes,
        Richard

        marion <at.hazard@...> wrote:
        I've contacted Somerset County Library, Richard, and have learned that
        Mr A. Stansell came from a family of builders, painters, glaziers and
        plumbers. His father, William, was born in 1823 in Westminster and
        moved south west. His son Alfred joined the firm in 1840 and
        specialised in glass, stained and heraldic, painting (and plumbing);
        his styles were described as 'gothic' and 'arabesque' - interesting in
        view of Chris's response to the interior design of Pontargothi. He
        extended his work in interior design to Ireland and France, and
        decorated country houses. The firm Stansell of Taunton still exists and
        had done some work on the Somerset Country Library building; it has
        also endowed an art gallery in Taunton. Oh, and has done restoration
        work on Wells Cathedral.
        Marion

        On 30 Apr 2007, at 23:12, RICHARD CAMP wrote:

        > Like Llanfair Kilgeddin, a church deep in rural Wales, with a complete
        > set of murals covering almost every inch of wall, looking foreign.
        > Does anyone know about Mr A. Stansell of Taunton who did the
        > Pontargothi murals? Like Llanfair K, also expertly restored last year
        > thanks to CADW and other grants...






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