Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Boveney, Bucks

Expand Messages
  • Richard Camp
    Marion et al I see that English Heritage are making a large-ish grant towards the restoration of Boveney. Pevsner and the Shell Guide give it scant space, and
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 1 4:44 AM
      Marion et al

      I see that English Heritage are making a large-ish grant towards the restoration of Boveney. Pevsner and the Shell Guide give it scant space, and no picture. Do you have a photograph you could share with the rest of us, Marion? What is special about the Church? Is it as difficult to find as the Shell Guide suggests?
      Many thanks,
      Richard


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • magnetic@druidic.org
      In article , ... http://www.friendsoffriendlesschurches.org.uk/boveney/boveneyappeal.htm
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 1 6:02 AM
        In article <20060601114443.56392.qmail@...>,
        richard.camp37@... (Richard Camp) wrote:

        > I see that English Heritage are making a large-ish grant towards the
        > restoration of Boveney. Pevsner and the Shell Guide give it scant
        > space, and no picture.

        http://www.friendsoffriendlesschurches.org.uk/boveney/boveneyappeal.htm

        http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuartajc/40798007/

        http://www.flickr.com/photos/skinnyde/31998118/


        --
        Mark Ynys-Mon
        http://www.druidic.org/camchurch/
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/mymuk/
        2757 AUC
      • marion
        Richard, Sorry can t help, it s one of the few near the Thames I haven t done . I m very curious now, of course. Marion
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 1 6:30 AM
          Richard,

          Sorry can't help, it's one of the few near the Thames I haven't 'done'.
          I'm very curious now, of course.

          Marion

          On 1 Jun 2006, at 12:44, Richard Camp wrote:

          > Marion et al
          >
          > I see that English Heritage are making a large-ish grant towards the
          > restoration of Boveney. Pevsner and the Shell Guide give it scant
          > space, and no picture. Do you have a photograph you could share with
          > the rest of us, Marion? What is special about the Church? Is it as
          > difficult to find as the Shell Guide suggests?
          > Many thanks,
          > Richard
        • Richard Camp
          Mark, Many thanks for referring us to the Friendless Churches site and others: all most informative. Splendid photographs. Interestly dated from the early
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 1 6:31 AM
            Mark,
            Many thanks for referring us to the Friendless Churches site and others: all most informative. Splendid photographs. Interestly dated from the early years of Henry VIII; extraordinary wooden tower.
            Richard

            magnetic@... wrote:
            In article <20060601114443.56392.qmail@...>,
            richard.camp37@... (Richard Camp) wrote:

            > I see that English Heritage are making a large-ish grant towards the
            > restoration of Boveney. Pevsner and the Shell Guide give it scant
            > space, and no picture.

            http://www.friendsoffriendlesschurches.org.uk/boveney/boveneyappeal.htm

            http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuartajc/40798007/

            http://www.flickr.com/photos/skinnyde/31998118/


            --
            Mark Ynys-Mon
            http://www.druidic.org/camchurch/
            http://www.flickr.com/photos/mymuk/
            2757 AUC


            Don't forget to Email URLs of websites to members that you have found and think are worthy of recommendation.



            SPONSORED LINKS
            Architecture design software Architecture design New school of architecture and design Architecture Architecture and home design Landscape architecture design

            ---------------------------------
            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


            Visit your group "Churchcrawling" on the web.

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            Churchcrawling-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


            ---------------------------------





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John Vigar
            Wearing my hat as a Trustee of Friends of Friendless Churches may I say how grateful I am that this church has been mentioned on list. It`s one of our on-going
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 2 5:44 AM
              Wearing my hat as a Trustee of Friends of Friendless Churches may I say
              how grateful I am that this church has been mentioned on list. It`s one
              of our on-going challenges. Having completed the conservation work on
              the tower (again with generous help from EH)we have to tackle the roof.
              Our charity has already set aside £45,000 from its own very limited
              resources and it is gratifying to see that EH values our work which
              this time will cost about £200,000.

              The church is not currently open to visitors but is easy to find, on
              the banks of the river. If visiting the area I would also recommend a
              visit to Dorney Court and church, both often used as locations for
              period dramas.

              The Friends always appreciate any financial help - or just the
              spreading of the word - to help them put Boveney in apple pie order.

              John V.
            • marion
              St Mary Magdelene. A Friend of Friendless Churches church, recently refurbished and open to the public in time for the Olympic boat races at Eton Dorney
              Message 6 of 19 , May 2, 2013
                St Mary Magdelene. A Friend of Friendless Churches church, recently refurbished and open to the public in time for the Olympic boat races at Eton Dorney (keyholder in Boveney Lock cottage, a brisk walk to the east of the church). Pevsner says it served a medieval Thames wharf - there's no easily found med pot in the field next to it, so that makes sense . Inside it's very plain, with early benches, a reasonable pulpit, and the timber bell frame on view. Nothing else of interest to be seen. Not sure why it was befriended, but it is very pleasantly situated. Marion








                Boveney

                 


              • KENNETH PAVER
                As you say, not much to see.   But what there is is pleasant- we ve all visited a lot worse in our time. ________________________________ From: marion
                Message 7 of 19 , May 2, 2013
                  As you say, not much to see.   But what there is is pleasant- we've all visited a lot worse in our time.


                  From: marion <marion.e.hall44@...>
                  To: churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: churchpictures@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, 2 May 2013, 15:37
                  Subject: [Churchcrawling] Boveney, Bucks

                  St Mary Magdelene. A Friend of Friendless Churches church, recently refurbished and open to the public in time for the Olympic boat races at Eton Dorney (keyholder in Boveney Lock cottage, a brisk walk to the east of the church). Pevsner says it served a medieval Thames wharf - there's no easily found med pot in the field next to it, so that makes sense . Inside it's very plain, with early benches, a reasonable pulpit, and the timber bell frame on view. Nothing else of interest to be seen. Not sure why it was befriended, but it is very pleasantly situated. Marion








                  Boveney
                   



                • John Vigar
                  It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished! The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their
                  Message 8 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                    It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished! The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their portfolio with significant support from EH. The timber work of the belfry is extremely important.

                    John V
                    Sent from my iPhone
                  • marion
                    ... I know, and its inaccessibility during the period it was being made safe made it a tantalising target church. ... Unfortunately, there is absolutely
                    Message 9 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                      On 3 May 2013, at 13:16, John Vigar wrote:

                      > It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished!

                      I know, and its inaccessibility during the period it was being made safe made it a tantalising target church.

                      > The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their portfolio with significant support from EH. The timber work of the belfry is extremely important.

                      Unfortunately, there is absolutely nothing in the building by way of information - nothing to indicate why it's been saved.
                      Even the charity in which it's vested gets no mention at all - no plaque, no paper, nothing. Zilch. Having walked quite a distance to get the key - something which again raises expectations, esp. when the lock keeper asked for twenty quid ! (I thought he was joking) or my car keys (he got those), by way of security for the church keys' return, I thought this place really has to be something. But it's just ordinary. If the belfry is unusual, and, as you say it is John, of course, it must be, then some information about what makes it special is really absolutely necessary. I like wooden bell frames and know two in Bucks I particularly appreciate : Hoggeston in particular. But, though I examined what I could see (you can't, of course, see what actually supports the bell up top) I personally couldn't see anything unusual. My ignorance, of course - which could've been sorted out by FFC making information available. Marion


                      >
                      > John V
                      > Sent from my iPhone
                    • Chris Stafford
                      I thought it was a water wheel at the W end of the church, so much woodwork ;-) Most interesting, also enjoyed Dorney, some great pictures, thank you Marion.
                      Message 10 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                        I thought it was a water wheel at the W end of the church, so much woodwork ;-) Most interesting, also enjoyed Dorney, some great pictures, thank you Marion.


                        From: marion <marion.e.hall44@...>
                        To: Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, 3 May 2013, 14:06
                        Subject: Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks

                         

                        On 3 May 2013, at 13:16, John Vigar wrote:

                        > It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished!

                        I know, and its inaccessibility during the period it was being made safe made it a tantalising target church.

                        > The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their portfolio with significant support from EH. The timber work of the belfry is extremely important.

                        Unfortunately, there is absolutely nothing in the building by way of information - nothing to indicate why it's been saved.
                        Even the charity in which it's vested gets no mention at all - no plaque, no paper, nothing. Zilch. Having walked quite a distance to get the key - something which again raises expectations, esp. when the lock keeper asked for twenty quid ! (I thought he was joking) or my car keys (he got those), by way of security for the church keys' return, I thought this place really has to be something. But it's just ordinary. If the belfry is unusual, and, as you say it is John, of course, it must be, then some information about what makes it special is really absolutely necessary. I like wooden bell frames and know two in Bucks I particularly appreciate : Hoggeston in particular. But, though I examined what I could see (you can't, of course, see what actually supports the bell up top) I personally couldn't see anything unusual. My ignorance, of course - which could've been sorted out by FFC making information available. Marion

                        >
                        > John V
                        > Sent from my iPhone



                      • John Vigar
                        I do agree, Marion. We are steadily working our way through signboards and have just published our first guide ( Urishay, Herefordshire). But we don t have
                        Message 11 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                          I do agree, Marion. We are steadily working our way through signboards and have just published our first guide ( Urishay, Herefordshire). But we don't have enough money to do all the repairs needed, let alone print guides so it is always a problem. With 50 odd churches and only one full time employee we do sometimes have to put off the inessentials. However, if you buy our book Saving Churches there is a history of each of our churches and the work we have done to them. It's a cracker.

                          John V

                          Sent from my iPad
                        • Chris Stafford
                          I find it amazing that the FoFC and CCT cannot put a series of downloadable PDF s on their website, anyone planning a trip can then have a printable copy, or
                          Message 12 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                            I find it amazing that the FoFC and CCT cannot put a series of downloadable PDF's on their website, anyone planning a trip can then have a printable copy, or have a copy on their smartphone or tablet if they have one. This would improve the visitor experience no end and hopefully increase any contribution they make. The cost to these organisations is minimal as the information already exists, in the saving churches book for the FoFC and in the existing guides with the CCT. Lots of CCT churches I have visited have run out of their original guides, sometimes there are photocopies that locals have prepared, but quite often there is nothing. Chris


                            From: John Vigar <john@...>
                            To: "Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com" <Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Friday, 3 May 2013, 17:45
                            Subject: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks

                             
                            I do agree, Marion. We are steadily working our way through signboards and have just published our first guide ( Urishay, Herefordshire). But we don't have enough money to do all the repairs needed, let alone print guides so it is always a problem. With 50 odd churches and only one full time employee we do sometimes have to put off the inessentials. However, if you buy our book Saving Churches there is a history of each of our churches and the work we have done to them. It's a cracker.

                            John V

                            Sent from my iPad


                          • Andy Foster
                            Marion thanks for the pictures. Boveney looks anything but ordinary: apart from that timber structure at the west end, there are an old roof, old benches,
                            Message 13 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                              Marion thanks for the pictures. Boveney looks anything but ordinary: apart from that timber structure at the west end, there are an old roof, old benches, panelling, and something I can't understand but like with a fleur-de-lys on top. It's all very simple but that's part of its charm.
                               
                              AF
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: marion
                              Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 2:06 PM
                              Subject: Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks

                               


                              On 3 May 2013, at 13:16, John Vigar wrote:

                              > It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished!

                              I know, and its inaccessibility during the period it was being made safe made it a tantalising target church.

                              > The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their portfolio with significant support from EH. The timber work of the belfry is extremely important.

                              Unfortunately, there is absolutely nothing in the building by way of information - nothing to indicate why it's been saved.
                              Even the charity in which it's vested gets no mention at all - no plaque, no paper, nothing. Zilch. Having walked quite a distance to get the key - something which again raises expectations, esp. when the lock keeper asked for twenty quid ! (I thought he was joking) or my car keys (he got those), by way of security for the church keys' return, I thought this place really has to be something. But it's just ordinary. If the belfry is unusual, and, as you say it is John, of course, it must be, then some information about what makes it special is really absolutely necessary. I like wooden bell frames and know two in Bucks I particularly appreciate : Hoggeston in particular. But, though I examined what I could see (you can't, of course, see what actually supports the bell up top) I personally couldn't see anything unusual. My ignorance, of course - which could've been sorted out by FFC making information available. Marion

                              >
                              > John V
                              > Sent from my iPhone

                            • marion
                              This is the page from the FFC website http://www.friendsoffriendlesschurches.org.uk/CMSMS/index.php?page=boveny-st-mary-magdalene it refers to, and I quote:
                              Message 14 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                                This is the page from the FFC website
                                http://www.friendsoffriendlesschurches.org.uk/CMSMS/index.php?page=boveny-st-mary-magdalene

                                it refers to, and I quote: "What tips it into that highest of all listing categories is the remarkable vernacular interior with 18th and 19th Century fittings, its romantic location adjacent to the Thames and its very early origins in the 12th Century". Remarkable?

                                Bucks updated BoE is much more down to earth listing its building material :chalk rubble and flint. Nave and chancel in one. 'Nasty 19th and 20th century brick plinth all the way round (it is very evident) and 'slanting buttresses of 18th and early 19thc at the west end. Weatherboaded bell-turret.' Nothing more.

                                Who's right? I'd say BoE.

                                But it would be interesting to learn what the function of the 'screen' with its sawn off pieces of wood sticking up with, as you say, fleur de lys add-ons, is. I couldn't guess. The fleur de lyses looked as though they'd come from from another church. And I would've appreciated any information about the bell support structure - which does look wheel-like. It would also have been interesting to see what the roof was like, as it's now hidden by a ceiling - photos of work in progress during the restoration would've been good. Also photos of other things hidden, such as the bells.

                                Suggestions to make visiting Boveney a more satisfactory 'visitor experience' :

                                1. improve the notice board by adding an arrow pointing in the direction of the lock-keeper's place - not every visitor to churches knows about Christian orientation, so saying that the key can be obtained from a place 'to the east' isn't ideal and that's the current extent of directions at present. Also an indication of distance to the cottage would be good as you can't see it from the church and it's actually quite a walk.

                                2. a one sheet guide on any old bit of paper inside the building explaining what's what.

                                3. postcards or something attractive for sale (honesty box stuff). Plus jams, second hand books and other things which would make the place seem friendlier.

                                4. promotional material about FoFC.

                                5. photos taken during the restoration.

                                6. A nice bench to sit on outside, against a wall, overlooking the Thames.

                                If John V or any other person connected with FoFC would like to send me information to put on a single sheet, I undertake to type such info out, print it, and take 100 or more copies to the church myself [I've created a short history of my quaker meeting house which goes into Amersham Museum and is put out on Heritage Open Days, so this would be easy-peasy]. Further, I'll check with the lock keeper to find out how many visitors call (and have their car keys held hostage) so that I can work out how often such leaflets would need to be topped up. I'll even provide photo souvenirs - though not postcards as I can't print onto card, my printer is too ancient. I don't make jam, preferring to eat Ken's; I recommend his strawberry in particular. But I do have loads of books which I could donate - of all sorts. A bench would be a bit costly, as I've already given the quakers two. But I could provide a small, black, wooden folding picnic table and two chairs (which might walk, but that wouldn't matter.)
                                Marion

                                On 3 May 2013, at 19:26, Andy Foster wrote:

                                >
                                >
                                > Marion thanks for the pictures. Boveney looks anything but ordinary: apart from that timber structure at the west end, there are an old roof, old benches, panelling, and something I can't understand but like with a fleur-de-lys on top. It's all very simple but that's part of its charm.
                                >
                                > AF
                                >
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: marion
                                > To: Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com
                                > Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 2:06 PM
                                > Subject: Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks
                                >
                                >
                                > On 3 May 2013, at 13:16, John Vigar wrote:
                                >
                                > > It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished!
                                >
                                > I know, and its inaccessibility during the period it was being made safe made it a tantalising target church.
                                >
                                > > The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their portfolio with significant support from EH. The timber work of the belfry is extremely important.
                                >
                                > Unfortunately, there is absolutely nothing in the building by way of information - nothing to indicate why it's been saved.
                                > Even the charity in which it's vested gets no mention at all - no plaque, no paper, nothing. Zilch. Having walked quite a distance to get the key - something which again raises expectations, esp. when the lock keeper asked for twenty quid ! (I thought he was joking) or my car keys (he got those), by way of security for the church keys' return, I thought this place really has to be something. But it's just ordinary. If the belfry is unusual, and, as you say it is John, of course, it must be, then some information about what makes it special is really absolutely necessary. I like wooden bell frames and know two in Bucks I particularly appreciate : Hoggeston in particular. But, though I examined what I could see (you can't, of course, see what actually supports the bell up top) I personally couldn't see anything unusual. My ignorance, of course - which could've been sorted out by FFC making information available. Marion
                                >
                                > >
                                > > John V
                                > > Sent from my iPhone
                              • Andy Foster
                                Marion, your own pictures, especially of the interior, show that the BoE account is seriously flawed. Bucks is an early update. Those fittings are lovely. I
                                Message 15 of 19 , May 3, 2013
                                  Marion, your own pictures, especially of the interior, show that the BoE account is seriously flawed. Bucks is an early update. Those fittings are lovely. I find it odd that with their simplicity they do not appeal to your Quaker consciousness. I strongly suspect that Elizabeth Williamson and/or Geoff Brandwood did not get in, in the days when it was very closed. What has made you so sour? The rude comment about the ceiling, a feature once universal but lost from nearly all our churches, I don't understand at all.
                                   
                                  FoFC is run together with the Ancient Monuments Society by one person, Matthew Saunders, with one assistant. With that person-power they are the official redundancy body in Wales as well as having twenty or so churches in England. They've carried out substantial repair programmes at nearly all of them. There is no money to employ more staff. It runs on a shoestring (a most elegant shoestring since Matthew always wears immaculate brogues). He is something of a hero to me and others for what he has done. In Lleyn, where I've been going since childhood for holidays, FoFC have three of the tiny unrestored churches in that remote country: Ynyscynhaearn, Penllech, Penmorfa, and nearby Llanfaglan and Llanfrothen. Without FoFC they might have gone for domestic conversion. And heaven preserve us from visitor experiences. I hope it looks like a church.
                                   
                                  Why don't you join? You get the most wonderful magazine three times a year with more information about happenings in the world of conservation and historic architecture than anything else I know.
                                   
                                  Andy F
                                   
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: marion
                                  Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 9:17 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks

                                   

                                  This is the page from the FFC website
                                  http://www.friendsoffriendlesschurches.org.uk/CMSMS/index.php?page=boveny-st-mary-magdalene

                                  it refers to, and I quote: "What tips it into that highest of all listing categories is the remarkable vernacular interior with 18th and 19th Century fittings, its romantic location adjacent to the Thames and its very early origins in the 12th Century". Remarkable?

                                  Bucks updated BoE is much more down to earth listing its building material :chalk rubble and flint. Nave and chancel in one. 'Nasty 19th and 20th century brick plinth all the way round (it is very evident) and 'slanting buttresses of 18th and early 19thc at the west end. Weatherboaded bell-turret.' Nothing more.

                                  Who's right? I'd say BoE.

                                  But it would be interesting to learn what the function of the 'screen' with its sawn off pieces of wood sticking up with, as you say, fleur de lys add-ons, is. I couldn't guess. The fleur de lyses looked as though they'd come from from another church. And I would've appreciated any information about the bell support structure - which does look wheel-like. It would also have been interesting to see what the roof was like, as it's now hidden by a ceiling - photos of work in progress during the restoration would've been good. Also photos of other things hidden, such as the bells.

                                  Suggestions to make visiting Boveney a more satisfactory 'visitor experience' :

                                  1. improve the notice board by adding an arrow pointing in the direction of the lock-keeper's place - not every visitor to churches knows about Christian orientation, so saying that the key can be obtained from a place 'to the east' isn't ideal and that's the current extent of directions at present. Also an indication of distance to the cottage would be good as you can't see it from the church and it's actually quite a walk.

                                  2. a one sheet guide on any old bit of paper inside the building explaining what's what.

                                  3. postcards or something attractive for sale (honesty box stuff). Plus jams, second hand books and other things which would make the place seem friendlier.

                                  4. promotional material about FoFC.

                                  5. photos taken during the restoration.

                                  6. A nice bench to sit on outside, against a wall, overlooking the Thames.

                                  If John V or any other person connected with FoFC would like to send me information to put on a single sheet, I undertake to type such info out, print it, and take 100 or more copies to the church myself [I've created a short history of my quaker meeting house which goes into Amersham Museum and is put out on Heritage Open Days, so this would be easy-peasy]. Further, I'll check with the lock keeper to find out how many visitors call (and have their car keys held hostage) so that I can work out how often such leaflets would need to be topped up. I'll even provide photo souvenirs - though not postcards as I can't print onto card, my printer is too ancient. I don't make jam, preferring to eat Ken's; I recommend his strawberry in particular. But I do have loads of books which I could donate - of all sorts. A bench would be a bit costly, as I've already given the quakers two. But I could provide a small, black, wooden folding picnic table and two chairs (which might walk, but that wouldn't matter.)
                                  Marion

                                  On 3 May 2013, at 19:26, Andy Foster wrote:

                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Marion thanks for the pictures. Boveney looks anything but ordinary: apart from that timber structure at the west end, there are an old roof, old benches, panelling, and something I can't understand but like with a fleur-de-lys on top. It's all very simple but that's part of its charm.
                                  >
                                  > AF
                                  >
                                  > ----- Original Message -----
                                  > From: marion
                                  > To: Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 2:06 PM
                                  > Subject: Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > On 3 May 2013, at 13:16, John Vigar wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished!
                                  >
                                  > I know, and its inaccessibility during the period it was being made safe made it a tantalising target church.
                                  >
                                  > > The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their portfolio with significant support from EH. The timber work of the belfry is extremely important.
                                  >
                                  > Unfortunately, there is absolutely nothing in the building by way of information - nothing to indicate why it's been saved.
                                  > Even the charity in which it's vested gets no mention at all - no plaque, no paper, nothing. Zilch. Having walked quite a distance to get the key - something which again raises expectations, esp. when the lock keeper asked for twenty quid ! (I thought he was joking) or my car keys (he got those), by way of security for the church keys' return, I thought this place really has to be something. But it's just ordinary. If the belfry is unusual, and, as you say it is John, of course, it must be, then some information about what makes it special is really absolutely necessary. I like wooden bell frames and know two in Bucks I particularly appreciate : Hoggeston in particular. But, though I examined what I could see (you can't, of course, see what actually supports the bell up top) I personally couldn't see anything unusual. My ignorance, of course - which could've been sorted out by FFC making information available. Marion
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  > > John V
                                  > > Sent from my iPhone

                                • marion
                                  I don t know why you re being so aggressive. My interest in what lies above the ceiling is genuine and I thought if photos of stage restoration work were taken
                                  Message 16 of 19 , May 4, 2013
                                    I don't know why you're being so aggressive. My interest in what lies above the ceiling is genuine and I thought if photos of stage restoration work were taken they would be of interest to all visitors if put on display. My offer to take information leaflets to the building was also genuine, it might help fofc charity. Will I join? no. I prefer to make donations on a church-by-church basis when I visit. As for my aesthetic sense, you don't know me at all. As it happens, I don't know any quaker buildings which I particularly like, though some I find historically interesting : Jordans used to be an exception but accidental fire damage, the replacement of the old warden's quarters with a badly thought-out 'conference centre', but, more importantly, loss of external space due to the sale of the 'Mayflower Barn' and adjoining property - the latter to a millionaire sports car collector who immediately put up a barbed wire fence across land where everyone could once walk in peace in an area of unspoiled Chiltern landscape has meant even this place is no longer somewhere I want to visit. Chesham QMH is the most depressing building I've ever had to sit in silence for a whole hour. Amersham - yes, you're right, BoE updates are sometimes wrong; this update is wrong about this building (which is also very dull) as it's older than the eighteenth century facade suggests. As far as I'm concerned, this matter is now closed and I'll be taking a break in order to pursue other interests. Marion

                                    On 3 May 2013, at 23:45, Andy Foster wrote:

                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Marion, your own pictures, especially of the interior, show that the BoE account is seriously flawed. Bucks is an early update. Those fittings are lovely. I find it odd that with their simplicity they do not appeal to your Quaker consciousness. I strongly suspect that Elizabeth Williamson and/or Geoff Brandwood did not get in, in the days when it was very closed. What has made you so sour? The rude comment about the ceiling, a feature once universal but lost from nearly all our churches, I don't understand at all.
                                    >
                                    > FoFC is run together with the Ancient Monuments Society by one person, Matthew Saunders, with one assistant. With that person-power they are the official redundancy body in Wales as well as having twenty or so churches in England. They've carried out substantial repair programmes at nearly all of them. There is no money to employ more staff. It runs on a shoestring (a most elegant shoestring since Matthew always wears immaculate brogues). He is something of a hero to me and others for what he has done. In Lleyn, where I've been going since childhood for holidays, FoFC have three of the tiny unrestored churches in that remote country: Ynyscynhaearn, Penllech, Penmorfa, and nearby Llanfaglan and Llanfrothen. Without FoFC they might have gone for domestic conversion. And heaven preserve us from visitor experiences. I hope it looks like a church.
                                    >
                                    > Why don't you join? You get the most wonderful magazine three times a year with more information about happenings in the world of conservation and historic architecture than anything else I know.
                                    >
                                    > Andy F
                                  • ChurchCrawler
                                    Marion I hope the FoFC get to see this generous offer of time and commitment. I can see how the church at Boveney could be viewed as both dull and
                                    Message 17 of 19 , May 4, 2013
                                      Marion
                                       
                                      I hope the FoFC get to see this generous offer of time and commitment.
                                      I can see how the church at Boveney could be viewed as both dull and uninteresting, as well as peaceful and of antiquarian importance (the woodwork at the west end).
                                      After going for the key, itself seemingly a bit of a trek as well as rather negative in the welcoming department (and a walk which of course has to be done twice assuming you want your car keys back), if the result is the former then the visitor is left questioning why they bothered.
                                      An information sheet, or at least one of those information boards, should be the easiest thing to place in the church to augment the experience. A photomontage of the work done, or before / after shots, would also be a great benefit. And your offer to take on this responsibility is wonderful.
                                      John is currently in Innsbruck, but I am sure he will reply on his return.
                                       
                                       
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: marion
                                      Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 9:17 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks

                                       

                                      This is the page from the FFC website
                                      http://www.friendsoffriendlesschurches.org.uk/CMSMS/index.php?page=boveny-st-mary-magdalene

                                      it refers to, and I quote: "What tips it into that highest of all listing categories is the remarkable vernacular interior with 18th and 19th Century fittings, its romantic location adjacent to the Thames and its very early origins in the 12th Century". Remarkable?

                                      Bucks updated BoE is much more down to earth listing its building material :chalk rubble and flint. Nave and chancel in one. 'Nasty 19th and 20th century brick plinth all the way round (it is very evident) and 'slanting buttresses of 18th and early 19thc at the west end. Weatherboaded bell-turret.' Nothing more.

                                      Who's right? I'd say BoE.

                                      But it would be interesting to learn what the function of the 'screen' with its sawn off pieces of wood sticking up with, as you say, fleur de lys add-ons, is. I couldn't guess. The fleur de lyses looked as though they'd come from from another church. And I would've appreciated any information about the bell support structure - which does look wheel-like. It would also have been interesting to see what the roof was like, as it's now hidden by a ceiling - photos of work in progress during the restoration would've been good. Also photos of other things hidden, such as the bells.

                                      Suggestions to make visiting Boveney a more satisfactory 'visitor experience' :

                                      1. improve the notice board by adding an arrow pointing in the direction of the lock-keeper's place - not every visitor to churches knows about Christian orientation, so saying that the key can be obtained from a place 'to the east' isn't ideal and that's the current extent of directions at present. Also an indication of distance to the cottage would be good as you can't see it from the church and it's actually quite a walk.

                                      2. a one sheet guide on any old bit of paper inside the building explaining what's what.

                                      3. postcards or something attractive for sale (honesty box stuff). Plus jams, second hand books and other things which would make the place seem friendlier.

                                      4. promotional material about FoFC.

                                      5. photos taken during the restoration.

                                      6. A nice bench to sit on outside, against a wall, overlooking the Thames.

                                      If John V or any other person connected with FoFC would like to send me information to put on a single sheet, I undertake to type such info out, print it, and take 100 or more copies to the church myself [I've created a short history of my quaker meeting house which goes into Amersham Museum and is put out on Heritage Open Days, so this would be easy-peasy]. Further, I'll check with the lock keeper to find out how many visitors call (and have their car keys held hostage) so that I can work out how often such leaflets would need to be topped up. I'll even provide photo souvenirs - though not postcards as I can't print onto card, my printer is too ancient. I don't make jam, preferring to eat Ken's; I recommend his strawberry in particular. But I do have loads of books which I could donate - of all sorts. A bench would be a bit costly, as I've already given the quakers two. But I could provide a small, black, wooden folding picnic table and two chairs (which might walk, but that wouldn't matter.)
                                      Marion

                                      On 3 May 2013, at 19:26, Andy Foster wrote:

                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Marion thanks for the pictures. Boveney looks anything but ordinary: apart from that timber structure at the west end, there are an old roof, old benches, panelling, and something I can't understand but like with a fleur-de-lys on top. It's all very simple but that's part of its charm.
                                      >
                                      > AF
                                      >
                                      > ----- Original Message -----
                                      > From: marion
                                      > To: Churchcrawling@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 2:06 PM
                                      > Subject: Re: [Churchcrawling] Re: Boveney, Bucks
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > On 3 May 2013, at 13:16, John Vigar wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > It was befriended as it was in serious danger of being demolished!
                                      >
                                      > I know, and its inaccessibility during the period it was being made safe made it a tantalising target church.
                                      >
                                      > > The Friends of Friendless Churches has spent more on this church than any other in their portfolio with significant support from EH. The timber work of the belfry is extremely important.
                                      >
                                      > Unfortunately, there is absolutely nothing in the building by way of information - nothing to indicate why it's been saved.
                                      > Even the charity in which it's vested gets no mention at all - no plaque, no paper, nothing. Zilch. Having walked quite a distance to get the key - something which again raises expectations, esp. when the lock keeper asked for twenty quid ! (I thought he was joking) or my car keys (he got those), by way of security for the church keys' return, I thought this place really has to be something. But it's just ordinary. If the belfry is unusual, and, as you say it is John, of course, it must be, then some information about what makes it special is really absolutely necessary. I like wooden bell frames and know two in Bucks I particularly appreciate : Hoggeston in particular. But, though I examined what I could see (you can't, of course, see what actually supports the bell up top) I personally couldn't see anything unusual. My ignorance, of course - which could've been sorted out by FFC making information available. Marion
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      > > John V
                                      > > Sent from my iPhone

                                    • johnevigar
                                      Dear Marion Thanks for your kind offer to help. We hope to get a Friends group up and running which will help a great deal, as we only have the lock-keeper. We
                                      Message 18 of 19 , May 5, 2013
                                        Dear Marion

                                        Thanks for your kind offer to help. We hope to get a Friends group up and running which will help a great deal, as we only have the lock-keeper. We rely on volunteers and, as Andy says, we only have 1.5 staff none of whom is computer literate. So I am afraid we don't run to jam. In your neck of the woods our Baptist chapel at Waddesdon has the keyholder in Aylesbury, so in comparison Boveney is lucky. I do take on board many of your suggestions and will pass them on.


                                        Chris, the recent CCT guides are all downloadable from the website but they are rather difficult to find. You may need to email the office to get the link.

                                        Marion, the photos are lovely.

                                        John V.
                                      • marion
                                        If I can help your Friends group, please let them have my email address and I will do my best. I visited the delightful little Baptist chapel near Waddesdon
                                        Message 19 of 19 , May 5, 2013
                                        If I can help your Friends group, please let them have my email address and I will do my best.

                                        I visited the delightful little Baptist chapel near Waddesdon you refer to on a Bucks Archaeological Society crawl about three/four years ago; we were lucky in having a knowledgable member to explain it and in being able to talk it over amongst ourselves too which made the visit very enjoyable, but I think we were wrong, judging by the website information, in speculating that part of it had been used as a school room. Marion
                                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.