Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Beyond Power

Expand Messages
  • Michael
    Beyond Power - Chapter 3, The Thunder of Silence, by Joel S. Goldsmith _As long as man has someone or something to which he can cling, he will not find God.
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Beyond Power - Chapter 3, The Thunder of Silence, by Joel S. Goldsmith

      _As long as man has someone or something to which he can cling, he
      will not find God. Whatever man knows or is able to know with his
      human mentality—whether a thing or a thought—is not God. No one is
      going to find God while he has anything on which to stand, anything to
      which he can hold, or anything about which he can think. Startling and
      unbelievable as this may seem to be, nevertheless it is true.
      Most of us have known a fair share of the good things of life and a
      few of the bad ones; and while we may not have been happy with the bad
      things, we undoubtedly would also admit that we did not find any
      permanent happiness in the good ones. Many of us must have suspected
      that there is something beyond all this, but what? What is that
      something? Is it God, and if so, what is it that men call God? Is God
      just a vague hope, a senseless dream, or is God really attainable? Is
      it possible to know God?
      The search for God is not easy for anyone, and when the revelation of
      God does come, it is something so entirely different from what was
      expected that if a person is honest he will have to confess that it is
      beyond his understanding. Only after finding corroboration for what he
      himself has discovered as it is presented in a thousand different ways
      through the spoken and written word and then living with it for years
      and years, does it ultimately register.
      Religions have evolved because somewhere far back in the past men were
      constantly encountering troubles of one sort or another in their human
      experience. If they were fishermen, they found that the fish were not
      running well in some sea¬sons; if they were hunters, there were
      periods when the game was scarce; and for those engaged in farming,
      some years there was too much rain and some years not enough.
      Occasionally, there were enemies from across the border molesting
      them, and at such times the strong nearly always overcame the weak,
      plundering their less powerful neighbors and often reducing them to
      the status of slaves. Even if they did not hold their captives in
      complete physical slavery, they held them in mental slavery, keeping
      them in as much darkness as possible that they might exploit them the
      more easily; but then, if and when the weak became strong, the picture
      was often reversed.
      The record of history indicates that the mighty have always taken from
      the weak. Bullets overpowered those who had bows and arrows; cannon
      triumphed over bullets; and finally bombs overcame cannon. One power
      has always been used to overcome another power, and as a last resort,
      men have turned to God hoping that He would be more powerful than the
      weapons they possessed.
      The Old Testament is filled with accounts of people and nations who
      called upon God to destroy their enemies. That these enemies were more
      wicked than they and, therefore, deserved to be destroyed is usually
      not recounted—only that they needed the land of their enemies or their
      enemies' slaves, or that they needed some other thing which their
      enemies possessed. Their whole object in praying to God was that He
      would wipe out the enemy and deliver to them their property!
      That is what God means to most people today—something to use. Only
      now, instead of being concerned merely with their human enemies,
      people have assigned to God the additional responsibility of removing
      their diseases and sins. Always man seeks a greater power with which
      to overcome those powers that disturb or annoy him.
      Today, the world has witnessed the discovery of tremen¬dous powers
      which are greater than any ever expected of, or attributed to, God
      because material powers have been discovered which can almost
      instantaneously wipe out the enemy if only the aggressor can get there
      first. The world has even discovered mental powers, but no one has yet
      discovered, either in the physical realm, the mental or the spiritual,
      a power that can destroy or overcome the sins, diseases, and poverty
      of the world.
      This modern mechanistic world is still seeking exactly what it sought
      before the days of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; it is still praying to
      God for the same things for which our pagan ancestors prayed. Man has
      not yet learned the great lesson that the overcoming of any and every
      difficulty is not through using any kind of power; and if in all the
      thousands of years the world has not learned the folly of seeking
      powers with which to overcome error, it may be wise to let it pursue
      its vacillating course while we walk the high way, the infinite way,
      demonstrating that there are no powers to be overcome because life is
      to be lived "not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit."
      When the great wizard of General Electric, Charles P. Steinmetz, said
      forty years ago that the next great discovery in the world would be
      spiritual power, he was prophetic. It must be understood, however,
      that this spiritual power to which he referred is not power in the
      commonly accepted meaning of the term: Spiritual power is the lack of
      power; it is no power in the sense that it is nothing that the world
      can conceive of as power because it is neither physical nor
      mental. It is not a power that can be manipulated by man, and that is
      why a term such as using Truth is archaic. Truth cannot be used. God
      cannot be used. Imagine man's using God! The very thought is shocking.
      When spiritual power is finally understood, it will be revealed to be
      no-power. And what is the meaning of such a statement? No-power means
      a state of consciousness in which there are not two forces combating
      one another, there are not two powers, one to be used to destroy the
      other. In other words, there is not a spiritual power that can be used
      by anyone to destroy his enemies; there is no spiritual power that can
      be used in place of the nuclear power upon which the world is now relying.
      Some of us may think that inasmuch as the power we are seeking and
      hoping to use is spiritual, that makes its use legitimate. But what we
      really are doing is expecting spiritual power to do exactly what we
      have relied upon bombs to do. Let us not be deluded into believing
      that it is possible to find some undiscovered power to do what the
      already discovered powers are failing to do. We are not going to find
      a spiritual power to destroy or overcome anything: Instead, we are
      going to overcome the belief that there is good or evil in any effect
      or in any form.
      When I was led to meditate on this idea of power, I saw that the cause
      of all the turmoil and conflict in life lies in the deep-seated belief
      in two powers which has resulted in such attitudes as that of the
      survival of the fittest, self-preservation as the first law of nature,
      and the use of force in war and in almost every other activity of
      human existence. Always throughout the ages one power has been used to
      overcome, destroy, or replace another power, and yet despite all this
      use of power, the same evils that were on earth at the beginning of
      time are still plaguing the world. The passing of years has not in any
      sense eliminated or destroyed the power of evil.
      It was in meditation, while pondering this, that the question came to
      my mind, "Does this mean that what man is searching for is a greater
      power to do something to these other powers? Is it possible that there
      is a spiritual force which will destroy material power and supplant
      it? And, in the event that such a spiritual force might be discovered,
      is there a possibility that some evils may develop in its use so that
      ultimately the world will have to find still another power with which
      to overcome the spiritual power? What is the limit? Where does it all
      stop?"
      I knew that wherever power of any kind has been used there have always
      been the possibility and the potentiality of its being used either for
      good or for evil. "How can this be?" was the question I asked in my
      meditation. "In a God-ordained world, is it possible that God-power
      can be used for both good and evil?"
      Quick as a flash the question answered itself: "No, if you ever
      discover what God-power is, you will learn that it has no opposite and
      no opposition; it cannot be used for good and it cannot be used for
      evil: It can only remain the cre¬ative, maintaining, and sustaining
      power of good, a power which cannot be used. God-power cannot be used:
      It can use us, but it cannot be used by us." That is the power the
      world awaits, a power which will prove to be no power, a power that no
      one can use, but that only God Itself can express, activate, and motivate.
      It became very clear to me that as long as there is a belief in two
      powers, there will be some people who will use power for good and
      other people who will use it for evil; but inas¬much as inertia
      prevents most members of the human family from taking a positive stand
      for good, the evil will usually predominate.
      When power rested primarily on material force, there were both good
      and bad material forces operating. Then came the era when mental power
      was in the preponderance, and for a short while it was a good era,
      during which time mental power was used for healing and regeneration,
      but it was not long before it was discovered that mental power could
      be used for evil purposes as well as for good. Today the world as
      always is a world of both material and mental forces. The challenge is
      to go beyond the use of any force or power to a state of no power.
      For every bit of good power in the physical or mental realm that can
      be brought to bear in any situation, somebody in this world is going
      to discover how to use a corresponding amount of evil power. The
      ultimate solution to this battle of opposing forces is the ability to
      rise to God-power, which is not good power but a creative,
      maintaining, and sustaining power; to rise to a dimension of life in
      which there is no power, that is, no power that can be used.
      In a God-created universe, the secret of life is no power. When we
      come to the place of no power, no power can operate against us, in us,
      or through us. That puts us in a very humble position where much as we
      may dislike doing it, we have to acknowledge as Jesus did, "I can of
      mine own self do nothing."
      That is the goal of this message—to come to a place where we do not
      pay lip service to the statement, "I can of mine own self do nothing,"
      but where we demonstrate that it is actually true and let whatever it
      is that is the power of God, the no-power, assert Itself and do the work.
      There is a second part of this principle which is of equal importance
      and a natural corollary of the first part. I have stated that men have
      always sought for a power to overcome other powers, but they have also
      sought for something more than that. They have sought for a God who
      would give them things—food, clothing, housing.
      Because the Master knew that, he cautioned his follow¬ers, "Take no
      thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor
      yet for your body, what ye shall put on." He knew that long before his
      day men had been seek-ing a God to give them food, clothing, housing,
      companionship, supply, good crops, good hunting, and good fishing; and
      even though his command was that they stop seeking after things, two
      thousand years later the world still goes to church to pray for the
      very things that the New Testament admonishes it not to pray for. Men
      are still seeking a God to give them things—and failing, just as they
      failed to find a God who would be an insuperable power to destroy
      their enemies.
      When we give up seeking the power of God, we shall find the no-power
      which brings harmony into our lives. When we give up seeking things of
      God, we shall receive the greatest gift—God Itself. We shall receive
      God in consciousness, in our inner sanctuary or temple, in that secret
      place of the most High, which is found in no other place than within
      ourselves. The great lesson to be learned is that the goal is
      God-realization, and that not for any purpose.
      To those who are thinking, "Should I not have health?" or, "Should I
      not have abundant supply?" my answer is, "I suppose so—I suppose so
      because the grace of God supplies us abundantly with everything of
      which we have need, even in what appears to be this human scene, but
      we do not have any power to get these things from God. When we have
      the actual conscious realization of God, pain, lack, and limitation
      fade away."
      Unfortunately, there will still be people who are sick or poor. The
      poor are always with us—the poor in health, the poor in purse, and the
      poor in morals. With these, we share out of our abundance to the best
      of our ability. More than that we cannot do. We can never give them
      all they need or want. That is an impossibility because there is no
      end to what "man, whose breath is in his nostrils" needs or wants; but
      until a person realizes the futility of seeking things, he will not be
      fulfilled.
      Why do we not stop searching for the power of God, stop looking for
      some thought or some truth that we think will make us well or
      prosperous, and acknowledge that of our own selves we can do nothing,
      and that nobody ever has discovered a power that destroys his enemies?
      Let us rest in the realiza¬tion that all the evil of this world
      constitutes but the "arm of flesh" and let it pass from our
      experience—let it pass—not by pushing or forcing it out, but by
      letting it pass. Nothing is accomplished by struggling physically or
      mentally, because struggling only increases what seems to be an evil
      power in our experience. It is you and I who falsely entertain a sense
      of the power of sin, false appetite, disease, lack, or limitation, a
      sense of power which the thing itself, whatever it is, does not have;
      and that is why no power discovered in the physical, mental, or
      spiritual realm has ever been sufficient to remove any unwanted condition.
      Every time that the thought comes to us, "I need this"; "I need that";
      "I would like this"; "I would like that"; "I should have this"; "I
      should have that"; our answer must be, " 'Man shall not live by bread
      alone'—by effect, by creation— but by Spirit, the Creator." That must
      be a continuous realization until we have overcome our desire for
      anybody or anything that is in the external realm. We have to lose all
      desire for the visible in the realization that we live not by that
      which is visible but by that which is invisible, and then we shall
      find that the Infinite Invisible will produce in our experience the
      persons, things, circumstances, and conditions necessary to our daily
      life.
      In the same way, every time we are tempted to think of some power—some
      negative, evil, erroneous power that apparently is dominating our
      life, rendering it futile and fruitless and which we want
      destroyed—let us smile at it as we realize, "No, I have no need of any
      power with which to overcome this discord. There is a God, even though
      I do not know what God is. I cannot know what God is because It is
      beyond the utmost comprehension of the human mind. If I could think
      something that I believed to be God, or Truth, I would ultimately find
      that that is not It." And so it would go on unto eternity until we
      come to the realization that if we can think It, It is not That.
      How could anyone possibly believe that a thought of God in his mind
      could be God? That would surely be localizing and finitizing Him. The
      great Solomon realized fully that even the magnificent Temple he had
      built could not house God. Nothing is great enough to house God. Not
      all the world can house Him, and yet we build a little doghouse in our
      minds, or a pigeon coop, and think that God is there sim¬ply because
      we have changed His name to Mind, Life, or Love, trying to anchor Him
      in thought where we think we can hold onto Him. How foolish that is!
      How impossible it is to build a mentality big enough for that! Why,
      this whole universe of men is not big enough to embrace God!
      Let us be satisfied to know that God is, and that there is evidence of
      that in the life all around us—in the law of like begetting like, in
      the abundance of love that there is in a world as loveless as this
      world sometimes seems to be, in the immeasurable beauty of a world
      where so much beauty is being destroyed continuously.
      What God is, we do not know, but there are many, many ways in which to
      observe and witness the is-ness of God-not by knowing God, but by
      seeing the effects of God. We do not know how God functions, but in
      The Infinite Way we have discovered that God operates in Silence when
      thought is stilled and when the human sense of self is so humble that
      it really and truly believes that "I can of mine own self do nothing,"
      and then has the patience to wait for God's glory to be revealed.
      It is only those who are ready to give up all their concepts of God,
      to stop dreaming, thinking, and outlining, who in that complete
      surrender can let God reveal Itself:
      God, I know not what You are, or even how to pray to You. I know not
      how to go in or how to come out; I know not what to pray for.
      I cannot believe in the God that the world has accepted for I have
      seen the fruitlessness and frustration which follow such blind faith.
      I must find the God whom no man knoweth, the God that is, the one true
      God that created this universe in His own image and likeness—perfect,
      harmonious, and whole—and who maintains and sustains it in its
      infinite and eternal perfection. In such a God I can believe.
      Reveal Yourself, Father; show me Your will. Never again will I
      dishonor You by trying to tell You what I need and then attempt to
      coerce You into delivering it. Never will I expect You to do my will
      or my bidding—to be my messenger boy.
      I place my life, my hand, my being, and my body in Your keeping. Do
      with them what You will, Father. Take my sins, my fears, and my
      diseases; take my health, and my wealth; take it all. I ask only one
      gift—the gift of You, Yourself.
      We can come to this state of receptivity and respond to it only at the
      point of our readiness, and our readiness comes only when we have
      experimented with all the different forms of God that the world
      presents to us—the God of the reli¬gious world, the metaphysical God,
      the God we think we can use, the God that demonstrates things. Every
      kind of God we try, and only when we come to the end of trying are we
      ready for this surrender, ready to give up seeking a great power to
      destroy our enemies or to shower us with gifts. We give up the desire
      for that kind of a God, and we rest in this word, "God is. Thy grace
      is my sufficiency—not power, not might. Man shall not live by outer
      powers or outer things, but by the Word."
      Long ago those of us who have delved into metaphysics lost our faith
      in material power and material means. Now when we take the next step
      of giving up our faith in mental means—mental powers and remedies—we
      come to the real God who can be experienced, but who can never be
      known with the mind and who cannot be used.
    • mnc6
      Michael These are wonderful posts....do you transcribe them from the tapes? For if you do I hope you know shorthand! Marc ... Goldsmith ... to ... and ... bad
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Michael

        These are wonderful posts....do you transcribe them from the tapes?
        For if you do I hope you know shorthand!

        Marc



        --- In ChristianScienceIssues2@yahoogroups.com, "Michael"
        <mikedanneary@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Beyond Power - Chapter 3, The Thunder of Silence, by Joel S.
        Goldsmith
        >
        > _As long as man has someone or something to which he can cling, he
        > will not find God. Whatever man knows or is able to know with his
        > human mentality—whether a thing or a thought—is not God. No one is
        > going to find God while he has anything on which to stand, anything
        to
        > which he can hold, or anything about which he can think. Startling
        and
        > unbelievable as this may seem to be, nevertheless it is true.
        > Most of us have known a fair share of the good things of life and a
        > few of the bad ones; and while we may not have been happy with the
        bad
        > things, we undoubtedly would also admit that we did not find any
        > permanent happiness in the good ones. Many of us must have suspected
        > that there is something beyond all this, but what? What is that
        > something? Is it God, and if so, what is it that men call God? Is
        God
        > just a vague hope, a senseless dream, or is God really attainable?
        Is
        > it possible to know God?
        > The search for God is not easy for anyone, and when the revelation
        of
        > God does come, it is something so entirely different from what was
        > expected that if a person is honest he will have to confess that it
        is
        > beyond his understanding. Only after finding corroboration for what
        he
        > himself has discovered as it is presented in a thousand different
        ways
        > through the spoken and written word and then living with it for
        years
        > and years, does it ultimately register.
        > Religions have evolved because somewhere far back in the past men
        were
        > constantly encountering troubles of one sort or another in their
        human
        > experience. If they were fishermen, they found that the fish were
        not
        > running well in some sea¬sons; if they were hunters, there were
        > periods when the game was scarce; and for those engaged in farming,
        > some years there was too much rain and some years not enough.
        > Occasionally, there were enemies from across the border molesting
        > them, and at such times the strong nearly always overcame the weak,
        > plundering their less powerful neighbors and often reducing them to
        > the status of slaves. Even if they did not hold their captives in
        > complete physical slavery, they held them in mental slavery, keeping
        > them in as much darkness as possible that they might exploit them
        the
        > more easily; but then, if and when the weak became strong, the
        picture
        > was often reversed.
        > The record of history indicates that the mighty have always taken
        from
        > the weak. Bullets overpowered those who had bows and arrows; cannon
        > triumphed over bullets; and finally bombs overcame cannon. One power
        > has always been used to overcome another power, and as a last
        resort,
        > men have turned to God hoping that He would be more powerful than
        the
        > weapons they possessed.
        > The Old Testament is filled with accounts of people and nations who
        > called upon God to destroy their enemies. That these enemies were
        more
        > wicked than they and, therefore, deserved to be destroyed is usually
        > not recounted—only that they needed the land of their enemies or
        their
        > enemies' slaves, or that they needed some other thing which their
        > enemies possessed. Their whole object in praying to God was that He
        > would wipe out the enemy and deliver to them their property!
        > That is what God means to most people today—something to use. Only
        > now, instead of being concerned merely with their human enemies,
        > people have assigned to God the additional responsibility of
        removing
        > their diseases and sins. Always man seeks a greater power with which
        > to overcome those powers that disturb or annoy him.
        > Today, the world has witnessed the discovery of tremen¬dous powers
        > which are greater than any ever expected of, or attributed to, God
        > because material powers have been discovered which can almost
        > instantaneously wipe out the enemy if only the aggressor can get
        there
        > first. The world has even discovered mental powers, but no one has
        yet
        > discovered, either in the physical realm, the mental or the
        spiritual,
        > a power that can destroy or overcome the sins, diseases, and poverty
        > of the world.
        > This modern mechanistic world is still seeking exactly what it
        sought
        > before the days of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; it is still praying to
        > God for the same things for which our pagan ancestors prayed. Man
        has
        > not yet learned the great lesson that the overcoming of any and
        every
        > difficulty is not through using any kind of power; and if in all the
        > thousands of years the world has not learned the folly of seeking
        > powers with which to overcome error, it may be wise to let it pursue
        > its vacillating course while we walk the high way, the infinite way,
        > demonstrating that there are no powers to be overcome because life
        is
        > to be lived "not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit."
        > When the great wizard of General Electric, Charles P. Steinmetz,
        said
        > forty years ago that the next great discovery in the world would be
        > spiritual power, he was prophetic. It must be understood, however,
        > that this spiritual power to which he referred is not power in the
        > commonly accepted meaning of the term: Spiritual power is the lack
        of
        > power; it is no power in the sense that it is nothing that the world
        > can conceive of as power because it is neither physical nor
        > mental. It is not a power that can be manipulated by man, and that
        is
        > why a term such as using Truth is archaic. Truth cannot be used. God
        > cannot be used. Imagine man's using God! The very thought is
        shocking.
        > When spiritual power is finally understood, it will be revealed to
        be
        > no-power. And what is the meaning of such a statement? No-power
        means
        > a state of consciousness in which there are not two forces combating
        > one another, there are not two powers, one to be used to destroy the
        > other. In other words, there is not a spiritual power that can be
        used
        > by anyone to destroy his enemies; there is no spiritual power that
        can
        > be used in place of the nuclear power upon which the world is now
        relying.
        > Some of us may think that inasmuch as the power we are seeking and
        > hoping to use is spiritual, that makes its use legitimate. But what
        we
        > really are doing is expecting spiritual power to do exactly what we
        > have relied upon bombs to do. Let us not be deluded into believing
        > that it is possible to find some undiscovered power to do what the
        > already discovered powers are failing to do. We are not going to
        find
        > a spiritual power to destroy or overcome anything: Instead, we are
        > going to overcome the belief that there is good or evil in any
        effect
        > or in any form.
        > When I was led to meditate on this idea of power, I saw that the
        cause
        > of all the turmoil and conflict in life lies in the deep-seated
        belief
        > in two powers which has resulted in such attitudes as that of the
        > survival of the fittest, self-preservation as the first law of
        nature,
        > and the use of force in war and in almost every other activity of
        > human existence. Always throughout the ages one power has been used
        to
        > overcome, destroy, or replace another power, and yet despite all
        this
        > use of power, the same evils that were on earth at the beginning of
        > time are still plaguing the world. The passing of years has not in
        any
        > sense eliminated or destroyed the power of evil.
        > It was in meditation, while pondering this, that the question came
        to
        > my mind, "Does this mean that what man is searching for is a greater
        > power to do something to these other powers? Is it possible that
        there
        > is a spiritual force which will destroy material power and supplant
        > it? And, in the event that such a spiritual force might be
        discovered,
        > is there a possibility that some evils may develop in its use so
        that
        > ultimately the world will have to find still another power with
        which
        > to overcome the spiritual power? What is the limit? Where does it
        all
        > stop?"
        > I knew that wherever power of any kind has been used there have
        always
        > been the possibility and the potentiality of its being used either
        for
        > good or for evil. "How can this be?" was the question I asked in my
        > meditation. "In a God-ordained world, is it possible that God-power
        > can be used for both good and evil?"
        > Quick as a flash the question answered itself: "No, if you ever
        > discover what God-power is, you will learn that it has no opposite
        and
        > no opposition; it cannot be used for good and it cannot be used for
        > evil: It can only remain the cre¬ative, maintaining, and sustaining
        > power of good, a power which cannot be used. God-power cannot be
        used:
        > It can use us, but it cannot be used by us." That is the power the
        > world awaits, a power which will prove to be no power, a power that
        no
        > one can use, but that only God Itself can express, activate, and
        motivate.
        > It became very clear to me that as long as there is a belief in two
        > powers, there will be some people who will use power for good and
        > other people who will use it for evil; but inas¬much as inertia
        > prevents most members of the human family from taking a positive
        stand
        > for good, the evil will usually predominate.
        > When power rested primarily on material force, there were both good
        > and bad material forces operating. Then came the era when mental
        power
        > was in the preponderance, and for a short while it was a good era,
        > during which time mental power was used for healing and
        regeneration,
        > but it was not long before it was discovered that mental power could
        > be used for evil purposes as well as for good. Today the world as
        > always is a world of both material and mental forces. The challenge
        is
        > to go beyond the use of any force or power to a state of no power.
        > For every bit of good power in the physical or mental realm that can
        > be brought to bear in any situation, somebody in this world is going
        > to discover how to use a corresponding amount of evil power. The
        > ultimate solution to this battle of opposing forces is the ability
        to
        > rise to God-power, which is not good power but a creative,
        > maintaining, and sustaining power; to rise to a dimension of life in
        > which there is no power, that is, no power that can be used.
        > In a God-created universe, the secret of life is no power. When we
        > come to the place of no power, no power can operate against us, in
        us,
        > or through us. That puts us in a very humble position where much as
        we
        > may dislike doing it, we have to acknowledge as Jesus did, "I can of
        > mine own self do nothing."
        > That is the goal of this message—to come to a place where we do not
        > pay lip service to the statement, "I can of mine own self do
        nothing,"
        > but where we demonstrate that it is actually true and let whatever
        it
        > is that is the power of God, the no-power, assert Itself and do the
        work.
        > There is a second part of this principle which is of equal
        importance
        > and a natural corollary of the first part. I have stated that men
        have
        > always sought for a power to overcome other powers, but they have
        also
        > sought for something more than that. They have sought for a God who
        > would give them things—food, clothing, housing.
        > Because the Master knew that, he cautioned his follow¬ers, "Take no
        > thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink;
        nor
        > yet for your body, what ye shall put on." He knew that long before
        his
        > day men had been seek-ing a God to give them food, clothing,
        housing,
        > companionship, supply, good crops, good hunting, and good fishing;
        and
        > even though his command was that they stop seeking after things, two
        > thousand years later the world still goes to church to pray for the
        > very things that the New Testament admonishes it not to pray for.
        Men
        > are still seeking a God to give them things—and failing, just as
        they
        > failed to find a God who would be an insuperable power to destroy
        > their enemies.
        > When we give up seeking the power of God, we shall find the no-power
        > which brings harmony into our lives. When we give up seeking things
        of
        > God, we shall receive the greatest gift—God Itself. We shall receive
        > God in consciousness, in our inner sanctuary or temple, in that
        secret
        > place of the most High, which is found in no other place than within
        > ourselves. The great lesson to be learned is that the goal is
        > God-realization, and that not for any purpose.
        > To those who are thinking, "Should I not have health?" or, "Should I
        > not have abundant supply?" my answer is, "I suppose so—I suppose so
        > because the grace of God supplies us abundantly with everything of
        > which we have need, even in what appears to be this human scene, but
        > we do not have any power to get these things from God. When we have
        > the actual conscious realization of God, pain, lack, and limitation
        > fade away."
        > Unfortunately, there will still be people who are sick or poor. The
        > poor are always with us—the poor in health, the poor in purse, and
        the
        > poor in morals. With these, we share out of our abundance to the
        best
        > of our ability. More than that we cannot do. We can never give them
        > all they need or want. That is an impossibility because there is no
        > end to what "man, whose breath is in his nostrils" needs or wants;
        but
        > until a person realizes the futility of seeking things, he will not
        be
        > fulfilled.
        > Why do we not stop searching for the power of God, stop looking for
        > some thought or some truth that we think will make us well or
        > prosperous, and acknowledge that of our own selves we can do
        nothing,
        > and that nobody ever has discovered a power that destroys his
        enemies?
        > Let us rest in the realiza¬tion that all the evil of this world
        > constitutes but the "arm of flesh" and let it pass from our
        > experience—let it pass—not by pushing or forcing it out, but by
        > letting it pass. Nothing is accomplished by struggling physically or
        > mentally, because struggling only increases what seems to be an evil
        > power in our experience. It is you and I who falsely entertain a
        sense
        > of the power of sin, false appetite, disease, lack, or limitation, a
        > sense of power which the thing itself, whatever it is, does not
        have;
        > and that is why no power discovered in the physical, mental, or
        > spiritual realm has ever been sufficient to remove any unwanted
        condition.
        > Every time that the thought comes to us, "I need this"; "I need
        that";
        > "I would like this"; "I would like that"; "I should have this"; "I
        > should have that"; our answer must be, " 'Man shall not live by
        bread
        > alone'—by effect, by creation— but by Spirit, the Creator." That
        must
        > be a continuous realization until we have overcome our desire for
        > anybody or anything that is in the external realm. We have to lose
        all
        > desire for the visible in the realization that we live not by that
        > which is visible but by that which is invisible, and then we shall
        > find that the Infinite Invisible will produce in our experience the
        > persons, things, circumstances, and conditions necessary to our
        daily
        > life.
        > In the same way, every time we are tempted to think of some power—
        some
        > negative, evil, erroneous power that apparently is dominating our
        > life, rendering it futile and fruitless and which we want
        > destroyed—let us smile at it as we realize, "No, I have no need of
        any
        > power with which to overcome this discord. There is a God, even
        though
        > I do not know what God is. I cannot know what God is because It is
        > beyond the utmost comprehension of the human mind. If I could think
        > something that I believed to be God, or Truth, I would ultimately
        find
        > that that is not It." And so it would go on unto eternity until we
        > come to the realization that if we can think It, It is not That.
        > How could anyone possibly believe that a thought of God in his mind
        > could be God? That would surely be localizing and finitizing Him.
        The
        > great Solomon realized fully that even the magnificent Temple he had
        > built could not house God. Nothing is great enough to house God. Not
        > all the world can house Him, and yet we build a little doghouse in
        our
        > minds, or a pigeon coop, and think that God is there sim¬ply because
        > we have changed His name to Mind, Life, or Love, trying to anchor
        Him
        > in thought where we think we can hold onto Him. How foolish that is!
        > How impossible it is to build a mentality big enough for that! Why,
        > this whole universe of men is not big enough to embrace God!
        > Let us be satisfied to know that God is, and that there is evidence
        of
        > that in the life all around us—in the law of like begetting like, in
        > the abundance of love that there is in a world as loveless as this
        > world sometimes seems to be, in the immeasurable beauty of a world
        > where so much beauty is being destroyed continuously.
        > What God is, we do not know, but there are many, many ways in which
        to
        > observe and witness the is-ness of God-not by knowing God, but by
        > seeing the effects of God. We do not know how God functions, but in
        > The Infinite Way we have discovered that God operates in Silence
        when
        > thought is stilled and when the human sense of self is so humble
        that
        > it really and truly believes that "I can of mine own self do
        nothing,"
        > and then has the patience to wait for God's glory to be revealed.
        > It is only those who are ready to give up all their concepts of God,
        > to stop dreaming, thinking, and outlining, who in that complete
        > surrender can let God reveal Itself:
        > God, I know not what You are, or even how to pray to You. I know not
        > how to go in or how to come out; I know not what to pray for.
        > I cannot believe in the God that the world has accepted for I have
        > seen the fruitlessness and frustration which follow such blind
        faith.
        > I must find the God whom no man knoweth, the God that is, the one
        true
        > God that created this universe in His own image and likeness—
        perfect,
        > harmonious, and whole—and who maintains and sustains it in its
        > infinite and eternal perfection. In such a God I can believe.
        > Reveal Yourself, Father; show me Your will. Never again will I
        > dishonor You by trying to tell You what I need and then attempt to
        > coerce You into delivering it. Never will I expect You to do my will
        > or my bidding—to be my messenger boy.
        > I place my life, my hand, my being, and my body in Your keeping. Do
        > with them what You will, Father. Take my sins, my fears, and my
        > diseases; take my health, and my wealth; take it all. I ask only one
        > gift—the gift of You, Yourself.
        > We can come to this state of receptivity and respond to it only at
        the
        > point of our readiness, and our readiness comes only when we have
        > experimented with all the different forms of God that the world
        > presents to us—the God of the reli¬gious world, the metaphysical
        God,
        > the God we think we can use, the God that demonstrates things. Every
        > kind of God we try, and only when we come to the end of trying are
        we
        > ready for this surrender, ready to give up seeking a great power to
        > destroy our enemies or to shower us with gifts. We give up the
        desire
        > for that kind of a God, and we rest in this word, "God is. Thy grace
        > is my sufficiency—not power, not might. Man shall not live by outer
        > powers or outer things, but by the Word."
        > Long ago those of us who have delved into metaphysics lost our faith
        > in material power and material means. Now when we take the next step
        > of giving up our faith in mental means—mental powers and remedies—we
        > come to the real God who can be experienced, but who can never be
        > known with the mind and who cannot be used.
        >
      • Nancy Dargle
        I like very much the way John Doorly equates seeking with the Word, and finding with the Christ, demonstrating with Christianity, and being with
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          I like very much the way John Doorly equates "seeking" with the Word, and "finding" with the Christ, "demonstrating" with Christianity, and "being" with Science.

          Joel's talking about seeking very much talks to that point that we have not yet put on the Christ power as long as we continue to seek. However, finding is the natural result of seeking and that is the Christ Truth speaking to us and becoming us as we put on the Christ mind.

          Nancy



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael
          Dear Marc, Most of the tape transcripts I already have, thank God. When I post from a book, until today, I ve typed in the whole chapter Myself, which
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 1, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Marc,
            Most of the tape transcripts I already have, thank God. When I
            post from a book, until today, I've typed in the whole chapter Myself,
            which although lengthy, helps Me learn it well. Beyond Power I did
            today with my scanner, which was almost more of a pain than typing it
            would have been. I scanned in one more chapter too which I thought
            was appropriate, called Who Told You?, which is all about the Tree of
            the Knowledge of Good and Evil. I think I'll wait on that one,
            though. I feel that it's time for Me to back off a bit and see what
            unfolds; it may be that I'm starting to judge some in this group by
            appearances....Joel will reappear though, but maybe I should let him
            let Me know when!

            Love,
            Michael




            --- In ChristianScienceIssues2@yahoogroups.com, mnc6 <no_reply@y...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Michael
            >
            > These are wonderful posts....do you transcribe them from the tapes?
            > For if you do I hope you know shorthand!
            >
            > Marc
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.