Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A Note on the Study of Greek

Expand Messages
  • Edward Moore
    Greetings All: There has been much hair-splitting, as of late, concerning the proper rendering of certain Greek passages of Scripture, both in the New
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings All:

      There has been much hair-splitting, as of late, concerning the proper
      rendering of certain Greek passages of Scripture, both in the New
      Testament and in the Septuagint. While this is certainly a welcome
      development here, I feel it is necessary to inject some sobriety into
      this intra-linguistic festival.

      Now, it is obvious to me that the individuals who are so vigorously
      analyzing the Greek texts have only a rudimentary knowledge of the
      language; a knowledge restricted to the New Testament, or Koine, form,
      that was current from about the time of Cicero until Plotinus (roughly).
      Without a knowledge, also, of Classical Attic and the Dorian dialect, as
      well as later so-called Patristic Greek, one is woefully ill-equipped to
      deal with the interpretative complexities attendant upon any passage of
      the New Testament -- and definitely the LXX, which is highly problematic
      in its intentionality.

      Further, while Thayer's lexicon is certainly informative, it is by no
      stretch of the imagination to be referred to as an authority in any
      interpretative matter -- even a strictly New Testament concern. Thayer
      must -- I repeat MUST -- be utilized alongside the more comprehensive
      tome of Liddell-Scott, not to mention a willingness to search out the
      more obscure occurrences of certain words and phrases in the tragedians
      and the Stoic philosophers, above all.

      Finally, a careful study of the Gnostic writings are really indispensable
      for a full understanding of the complex issues surrounding certain NT
      passages, issues arising at a very early date in the history of NT
      exegesis.

      I really wish I had the time available to engage in the present Hellenic
      festival of words. In the meantime, please do me a favor and take the
      time to actually LEARN the Greek language before you attempt to brand
      anyone else a fool for not knowing it adequately. I am speaking
      generally, not singling anyone out. But the perpetrators of inauthentic
      analysis, I am sure, know who they are.

      Eirene,

      Edwardus Diadochus





      Edward Moore
      St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology
      Home: http://www.saaot.edu
      Septuagint Translation Project: http://www.lxx.org
      Email. proteus28@... Fax. 1 810 454 1893
      ________________________________________________________________
      GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
      Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
      Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
      http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.
    • Bill Ross
      Edward, do you feel qualifed to give an opinion on Glen s is to forever from forever? Thanks, Bill Ross
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        <Bill>
        Edward, do you feel qualifed to give an opinion on Glen's "is to forever
        from forever?"

        Thanks,

        Bill Ross
      • Zippinspire@aol.com
        In a message dated 11/1/01 3:08:21 AM Eastern Standard Time, proteus28@juno.com writes:
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 1, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 11/1/01 3:08:21 AM Eastern Standard Time,
          proteus28@... writes:

          << Eirene,

          Edwardus Diadochus
          >>


          Edward? After consulting with Mr Webster, I still do not know what "Eirene"
          means, will you 'help me out' here? Thanks.

          Kath :)
        • Bill Ross
          ...After consulting with Mr Webster, I still do not know what Eirene means, will you help me out here? Peace. This is where the girl s name
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 1, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            <Kath>
            ...After consulting with Mr Webster, I still do not know what "Eirene"
            means, will you 'help me out' here?

            <Bill>
            "Peace." This is where the girl's name "Irene" comes from.

            Bill Ross
          • Zippinspire@aol.com
            In a message dated 11/1/01 10:26:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, wross@farmerstel.com writes: ...After consulting with Mr Webster, I still do not know
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 1, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              In a message dated 11/1/01 10:26:46 AM Eastern Standard Time,
              wross@... writes:

              << <Kath>
              ...After consulting with Mr Webster, I still do not know what "Eirene"
              means, will you 'help me out' here?

              <Bill>
              "Peace." This is where the girl's name "Irene" comes from.

              Bill Ross >>


              Hey, thanks Bill :) I thought you had 'left'.
              Kath means Pure One (or so I have been told:)
            • Edward Moore
              Greetings Everyone, Wow! There is so much really interesting stuff going on here now, to all of which I plan to reply. Let me start here first: ... It is the
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 1, 2001
              • 0 Attachment
                Greetings Everyone,

                Wow! There is so much really interesting stuff going on here now, to all
                of which I plan to reply. Let me start here first:

                On Thu, 1 Nov 2001 09:10:51 EST Zippinspire@... writes:

                > Edward? After consulting with Mr Webster, I still do not know what
                > "Eirene"
                > means, will you 'help me out' here? Thanks

                It is the Greek word for "peace." Actually, it is eire^ne^, pronounced
                'I-ray-nay'. It is part of Paul's favorite greeting -- Charis umin kai
                eire^ne^ apo Theou Patros e^mo^n kai Kurion Ie^sou Christou (Cor. 1:2) --
                "Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ."

                That is an excellent greeting, nay, a perfect, in my opinion.

                More later, on other matters ...

                "Peace,"

                Edward


                >
                > Kath :)
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > christian-philosophy-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >


                Edward Moore
                St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology
                Home: http://www.saaot.edu
                Septuagint Translation Project: http://www.lxx.org
                Email. proteus28@... Fax. 1 810 454 1893

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Zippinspire@aol.com
                In a message dated 11/1/01 3:43:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, proteus28@juno.com writes:
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 1, 2001
                • 0 Attachment
                  In a message dated 11/1/01 3:43:55 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                  proteus28@... writes:

                  << It is the Greek word for "peace." Actually, it is eire^ne^, pronounced
                  'I-ray-nay'. It is part of Paul's favorite greeting -- Charis umin kai
                  eire^ne^ apo Theou Patros e^mo^n kai Kurion Ie^sou Christou (Cor. 1:2) --
                  "Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ."

                  That is an excellent greeting, nay, a perfect, in my opinion.

                  More later, on other matters ...

                  "Peace,"

                  Edward >>

                  Aww Thanks Edward :) I bet the Greek sounds beautiful also, Yes you are
                  right, it IS a perfect greeting :)

                  "Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.",

                  Kath :)

                  It also makes a nice 'departing' thought, yes?
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.