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Moral Imperative

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  • Sbkidde@aol.com
    Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church. sbk Faith leaders - tackling climate change is a moral imperative Posted On : October 30,
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009
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      Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church.
       
      sbk
       
      Faith leaders - tackling climate change is a "moral imperative"

      Posted On : October 30, 2009 3:25 PM | Posted By : Admin ACO
      Related Categories: Lambeth

      ACNS: http://aco.org/acns/news.cfm/2009/10/30/ACNS4664

      The Archbishop of Canterbury hosted a meeting of faith leaders and
      faith-based and community organisations at Lambeth Palace to discuss the
      response of faith communities to the environmental crisis. With 40 days
      to go before the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit the participants have
      pledged to work together to raise awareness about the effects of
      'catastrophic climate change' on the world's poor and to take whatever
      action they can to "to reduce carbon emissions and promote sustainable
      practice." At the meeting a number of presentations highlighted the kind
      of action faith communities and faith-based organisations were already
      taking in the UK and with partners overseas.

      In the first statement of its kind, signed by leaders from every faith
      community (including Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist,
      Baha'i, Jain and Zoastrian) the signatories recognise "unequivocally
      that there is a moral imperative to tackle the causes of global warming"
      and that "Faith communities have a crucial role to play in pressing for
      changes in behaviour at every level of society and in every economic
      sector. We all have a responsibility to learn how to live and develop
      sustainably in a world of finite resources".

      They call for the UK government and G20 governments in particular to
      fight for an ambitious deal which offers hope of rises in global
      temperature being kept within two degrees centigrade.

      The statement has been welcomed by the Department for Energy and Climate
      Change (DECC). The Secretary of State Ed Miliband said: "Tackling
      climate change is a cause that unites people of all faiths. Each
      generation holds the planet in trust for the next and to fulfil our
      obligations to these future generations, we must succeed in getting a
      fair and ambitious agreement. We need the voice of all the world's
      religions in the coming weeks as we approach the Copenhagen summit."

      Dr Williams said: "This is an important meeting - the first of its kind
      in the UK. We all have to do more to face the challenges of climate
      change. Faith communities have a crucial role to play. That was
      highlighted today as were some of the things already being done. We must
      do our bit and encourage others to do theirs. Together we can and we
      will make a difference".

      The full text of the statement is below:

      Statement by Faith Leaders and participants in the Faith and Climate
      Change Seminar hosted by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace,
      29 October 2009

      As leaders and representatives of faith communities and faith-based
      organisations in the UK we wish to highlight the very real threat to the
      world's poor, and to our fragile creation, from the threat of
      catastrophic climate change. The developed world is primarily
      responsible for the already visible effects of global heating. Justice
      requires that we now take responsibility for slowing the rise in global
      temperature. We call upon UK negotiators at Copenhagen, and the other
      nations of the G20 in particular, to fight for a deal which speedily
      ends unsustainable reliance on fossil fuels and puts in place urgent
      measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so that global temperature
      rise may be kept within two degrees centigrade.

      We recognise unequivocally that there is a moral imperative to tackle
      the causes of global warming. This is reinforced by the reality that it
      is the poor and vulnerable who are most profoundly affected by the
      environmental impact of climate change - especially drought, floods,
      water shortages and rise in sea levels. Faith communities have a crucial
      role to play in pressing for changes in behaviour at every level of
      society and in every economic sector. We all have a responsibility to
      learn how to live and develop sustainably in a world of finite
      resources.

      This responsibility comes into sharp focus today with less than 40 days
      before representatives of governments from across the world meet to
      agree a deal on climate change.

      Building on the examples of local and international action to live and
      to work together sustainably which have been highlighted in our meeting
      today we pledge to:

      *Reach out to our communities, both in the UK and internationally, in
      the coming weeks to raise awareness of the real potential for
      catastrophic climate change and to increase public support for an
      ambitious, fair and effective deal at Copenhagen;
      *Continue to share best practice and redouble our efforts to reduce
      emissions that result from our institutional and individual activities;
      *Work with our partners, our sister churches and communities
      internationally to mitigate the effects of climate change on the poorest
      and most vulnerable communities in the developing world; and to press
      governments to support that effort.

      To help to achieve these ends we agree to use today's meeting as the
      first step in an ongoing process of collaboration. We believe our
      communities can be key agents of change and urge the Government wherever
      possible to support our efforts to build capacity and commitment to
      reduce carbon emissions, raise awareness and promote sustainable
      practice.

      Ends

      Notes to editors:

      Podcasts from the event are available here:
      www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/2583

      ___________________________________________________________________
      ACNSlist, published by Anglican Communion News Service, London, is
      distributed to more than 8,000 journalists and other readers around
      the world.

      For subscription INFORMATION please go to:
      http://www.anglicancommunion.org/acns/help/acnslist.cfm
    • TGGeko
      Everyone knows that humans are causing global warming, so I say get rid of them. All of them. But seriously, this isn t a problem that I worry about. I do,
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009
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        Everyone knows that humans are causing global warming, so I say get rid of them. All of them.

        But seriously, this isn't a problem that I worry about. I do, however recognize the need for cleaner energy. It's just good engineering to have efficient sources of power. Even if humans are causing it, the "green movement" will be good in that it will encourage such leaps in engineering and technology.

        --- In Christian-Philosophy@yahoogroups.com, Sbkidde@... wrote:
        >
        > Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church.
        >
        > sbk
        >
        > Faith leaders - tackling climate change is a "moral imperative"
        >
        > Posted On : October 30, 2009 3:25 PM | Posted By : Admin ACO
        > Related Categories: Lambeth
        >
        > ACNS: http://aco.org/acns/news.cfm/2009/10/30/ACNS4664
        >
        > The Archbishop of Canterbury hosted a meeting of faith leaders and
        > faith-based and community organisations at Lambeth Palace to discuss the
        > response of faith communities to the environmental crisis. With 40 days
        > to go before the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit the participants have
        > pledged to work together to raise awareness about the effects of
        > 'catastrophic climate change' on the world's poor and to take whatever
        > action they can to "to reduce carbon emissions and promote sustainable
        > practice." At the meeting a number of presentations highlighted the kind
        > of action faith communities and faith-based organisations were already
        > taking in the UK and with partners overseas.
        >
        > In the first statement of its kind, signed by leaders from every faith
        > community (including Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist,
        > Baha'i, Jain and Zoastrian) the signatories recognise "unequivocally
        > that there is a moral imperative to tackle the causes of global warming"
        > and that "Faith communities have a crucial role to play in pressing for
        > changes in behaviour at every level of society and in every economic
        > sector. We all have a responsibility to learn how to live and develop
        > sustainably in a world of finite resources".
        >
        > They call for the UK government and G20 governments in particular to
        > fight for an ambitious deal which offers hope of rises in global
        > temperature being kept within two degrees centigrade.
        >
        > The statement has been welcomed by the Department for Energy and Climate
        > Change (DECC). The Secretary of State Ed Miliband said: "Tackling
        > climate change is a cause that unites people of all faiths. Each
        > generation holds the planet in trust for the next and to fulfil our
        > obligations to these future generations, we must succeed in getting a
        > fair and ambitious agreement. We need the voice of all the world's
        > religions in the coming weeks as we approach the Copenhagen summit."
        >
        > Dr Williams said: "This is an important meeting - the first of its kind
        > in the UK. We all have to do more to face the challenges of climate
        > change. Faith communities have a crucial role to play. That was
        > highlighted today as were some of the things already being done. We must
        > do our bit and encourage others to do theirs. Together we can and we
        > will make a difference".
        >
        > The full text of the statement is below:
        >
        > Statement by Faith Leaders and participants in the Faith and Climate
        > Change Seminar hosted by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace,
        > 29 October 2009
        >
        > As leaders and representatives of faith communities and faith-based
        > organisations in the UK we wish to highlight the very real threat to the
        > world's poor, and to our fragile creation, from the threat of
        > catastrophic climate change. The developed world is primarily
        > responsible for the already visible effects of global heating. Justice
        > requires that we now take responsibility for slowing the rise in global
        > temperature. We call upon UK negotiators at Copenhagen, and the other
        > nations of the G20 in particular, to fight for a deal which speedily
        > ends unsustainable reliance on fossil fuels and puts in place urgent
        > measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so that global temperature
        > rise may be kept within two degrees centigrade.
        >
        > We recognise unequivocally that there is a moral imperative to tackle
        > the causes of global warming. This is reinforced by the reality that it
        > is the poor and vulnerable who are most profoundly affected by the
        > environmental impact of climate change - especially drought, floods,
        > water shortages and rise in sea levels. Faith communities have a crucial
        > role to play in pressing for changes in behaviour at every level of
        > society and in every economic sector. We all have a responsibility to
        > learn how to live and develop sustainably in a world of finite
        > resources.
        >
        > This responsibility comes into sharp focus today with less than 40 days
        > before representatives of governments from across the world meet to
        > agree a deal on climate change.
        >
        > Building on the examples of local and international action to live and
        > to work together sustainably which have been highlighted in our meeting
        > today we pledge to:
        >
        > *Reach out to our communities, both in the UK and internationally, in
        > the coming weeks to raise awareness of the real potential for
        > catastrophic climate change and to increase public support for an
        > ambitious, fair and effective deal at Copenhagen;
        > *Continue to share best practice and redouble our efforts to reduce
        > emissions that result from our institutional and individual activities;
        > *Work with our partners, our sister churches and communities
        > internationally to mitigate the effects of climate change on the poorest
        > and most vulnerable communities in the developing world; and to press
        > governments to support that effort.
        >
        > To help to achieve these ends we agree to use today's meeting as the
        > first step in an ongoing process of collaboration. We believe our
        > communities can be key agents of change and urge the Government wherever
        > possible to support our efforts to build capacity and commitment to
        > reduce carbon emissions, raise awareness and promote sustainable
        > practice.
        >
        > Ends
        >
        > Notes to editors:
        >
        > Podcasts from the event are available here:
        > www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/2583
        >
        > ___________________________________________________________________
        > ACNSlist, published by Anglican Communion News Service, London, is
        > distributed to more than 8,000 journalists and other readers around
        > the world.
        >
        > For subscription INFORMATION please go to:
        > http://www.anglicancommunion.org/acns/help/acnslist.cfm
        >
      • Sbkidde@aol.com
        In a message dated 11/2/2009 1:51:17 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, Sbkidde writes: Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church. sbk Faith
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009
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          In a message dated 11/2/2009 1:51:17 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, Sbkidde writes:
          Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church.
           
          sbk
           
          Faith leaders - tackling climate change is a "moral imperative"

          Posted On : October 30, 2009 3:25 PM | Posted By : Admin ACO
          Related Categories: Lambeth

          ACNS: http://aco.org/acns/news.cfm/2009/10/30/ACNS4664

          The Archbishop of Canterbury hosted a meeting of faith leaders and
          faith-based and community organisations at Lambeth Palace to discuss the
          response of faith communities to the environmental crisis. With 40 days
          to go before the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit the participants have
          pledged to work together to raise awareness about the effects of
          'catastrophic climate change' on the world's poor and to take whatever
          action they can to "to reduce carbon emissions and promote sustainable
          practice." At the meeting a number of presentations highlighted the kind
          of action faith communities and faith-based organisations were already
          taking in the UK and with partners overseas.

          In the first statement of its kind, signed by leaders from every faith
          community (including Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist,
          Baha'i, Jain and Zoastrian) the signatories recognise "unequivocally
          that there is a moral imperative to tackle the causes of global warming"
          and that "Faith communities have a crucial role to play in pressing for
          changes in behaviour at every level of society and in every economic
          sector. We all have a responsibility to learn how to live and develop
          sustainably in a world of finite resources".

          They call for the UK government and G20 governments in particular to
          fight for an ambitious deal which offers hope of rises in global
          temperature being kept within two degrees centigrade.

          The statement has been welcomed by the Department for Energy and Climate
          Change (DECC). The Secretary of State Ed Miliband said: "Tackling
          climate change is a cause that unites people of all faiths. Each
          generation holds the planet in trust for the next and to fulfil our
          obligations to these future generations, we must succeed in getting a
          fair and ambitious agreement. We need the voice of all the world's
          religions in the coming weeks as we approach the Copenhagen summit."

          Dr Williams said: "This is an important meeting - the first of its kind
          in the UK. We all have to do more to face the challenges of climate
          change. Faith communities have a crucial role to play. That was
          highlighted today as were some of the things already being done. We must
          do our bit and encourage others to do theirs. Together we can and we
          will make a difference".

          The full text of the statement is below:

          Statement by Faith Leaders and participants in the Faith and Climate
          Change Seminar hosted by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace,
          29 October 2009

          As leaders and representatives of faith communities and faith-based
          organisations in the UK we wish to highlight the very real threat to the
          world's poor, and to our fragile creation, from the threat of
          catastrophic climate change. The developed world is primarily
          responsible for the already visible effects of global heating. Justice
          requires that we now take responsibility for slowing the rise in global
          temperature. We call upon UK negotiators at Copenhagen, and the other
          nations of the G20 in particular, to fight for a deal which speedily
          ends unsustainable reliance on fossil fuels and puts in place urgent
          measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so that global temperature
          rise may be kept within two degrees centigrade.

          We recognise unequivocally that there is a moral imperative to tackle
          the causes of global warming. This is reinforced by the reality that it
          is the poor and vulnerable who are most profoundly affected by the
          environmental impact of climate change - especially drought, floods,
          water shortages and rise in sea levels. Faith communities have a crucial
          role to play in pressing for changes in behaviour at every level of
          society and in every economic sector. We all have a responsibility to
          learn how to live and develop sustainably in a world of finite
          resources.

          This responsibility comes into sharp focus today with less than 40 days
          before representatives of governments from across the world meet to
          agree a deal on climate change.

          Building on the examples of local and international action to live and
          to work together sustainably which have been highlighted in our meeting
          today we pledge to:

          *Reach out to our communities, both in the UK and internationally, in
          the coming weeks to raise awareness of the real potential for
          catastrophic climate change and to increase public support for an
          ambitious, fair and effective deal at Copenhagen;
          *Continue to share best practice and redouble our efforts to reduce
          emissions that result from our institutional and individual activities;
          *Work with our partners, our sister churches and communities
          internationally to mitigate the effects of climate change on the poorest
          and most vulnerable communities in the developing world; and to press
          governments to support that effort.

          To help to achieve these ends we agree to use today's meeting as the
          first step in an ongoing process of collaboration. We believe our
          communities can be key agents of change and urge the Government wherever
          possible to support our efforts to build capacity and commitment to
          reduce carbon emissions, raise awareness and promote sustainable
          practice.

          Ends

          Notes to editors:

          Podcasts from the event are available here:
          www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/2583

          ___________________________________________________________________
          ACNSlist, published by Anglican Communion News Service, London, is
          distributed to more than 8,000 journalists and other readers around
          the world.
           
        • Brother Dave
          Thanks Steve for bringing this up.   Some liberal churches are getting seriously sidetracked from their duty to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus - our sonship
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009
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            Thanks Steve for bringing this up.
             
            Some liberal churches are getting seriously sidetracked from their duty to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus - our sonship with God - to a much lesser and frivolous "environmental gospel" or "green gospel". "Climate change is a part of this foolishness.
             
            The hard scientific fact is that our planet earth has been in a normal, cyclical period of global cooling for about 12 years to date. Our sun has normal, cyclic variations of energy output, which slightly increase average temperatures of all of the planets in our solar system. If humans here were responsible for "global warming" or "global cooling", only the earth would have these small temperature variations, and NOT all of our planets in our solar system !  Since all planets heat or cool together, the obvious cause is the variations of solar energy.
             
            One good trend is that these liberal, leftist, political, environmental churches are losing members.  Most conservative churches ridicule the diversion from Gospel teaching to this new "environmental gospel'. 
             
            The only scientific and logic solution to the serious shortage of energy worldwide is to have huge programs of R & D to produce more advanced nuclear fission and nuclear fusion electrical generating power plants.  Solar panels, windmills and ethanol fuel are not efficient. Our country does have an advanced nuclear fusion and laser program; but few have heard about it, and the media does not cover it much; even though there is this website on the USA National Ignition Facility  https://lasers.llnl.gov/   Check it out.
             
            Peace and progress in Spirit and in Truth,
             
            Brother Dave
             
            http://www.LedByJesus.org/   our newest Christian website
             
            http://www.PureChristians.org/ Gospel enlarging website,
            proclaiming worldwide the True Religion
            OF JESUS and ABOUT JESUS and IN JESUS
             
            Come learn and share !



            From: "Sbkidde@..." <Sbkidde@...>
            To: Christian-Philosophy@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, November 2, 2009 12:51:17 PM
            Subject: [Christian-Philosophy] Moral Imperative

             

            Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church.
             
            sbk
             
            Faith leaders - tackling climate change is a "moral imperative"

            Posted On : October 30, 2009 3:25 PM | Posted By : Admin ACO
            Related Categories: Lambeth

            ACNS: http://aco.org/ acns/news. cfm/2009/ 10/30/ACNS4664

            The Archbishop of Canterbury hosted a meeting of faith leaders and
            faith-based and community organisations at Lambeth Palace to discuss the
            response of faith communities to the environmental crisis. With 40 days
            to go before the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit the participants have
            pledged to work together to raise awareness about the effects of
            'catastrophic climate change' on the world's poor and to take whatever
            action they can to "to reduce carbon emissions and promote sustainable
            practice." At the meeting a number of presentations highlighted the kind
            of action faith communities and faith-based organisations were already
            taking in the UK and with partners overseas.

            In the first statement of its kind, signed by leaders from every faith
            community (including Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist,
            Baha'i, Jain and Zoastrian) the signatories recognise "unequivocally
            that there is a moral imperative to tackle the causes of global warming"
            and that "Faith communities have a crucial role to play in pressing for
            changes in behaviour at every level of society and in every economic
            sector. We all have a responsibility to learn how to live and develop
            sustainably in a world of finite resources".

            They call for the UK government and G20 governments in particular to
            fight for an ambitious deal which offers hope of rises in global
            temperature being kept within two degrees centigrade.

            The statement has been welcomed by the Department for Energy and Climate
            Change (DECC). The Secretary of State Ed Miliband said: "Tackling
            climate change is a cause that unites people of all faiths. Each
            generation holds the planet in trust for the next and to fulfil our
            obligations to these future generations, we must succeed in getting a
            fair and ambitious agreement. We need the voice of all the world's
            religions in the coming weeks as we approach the Copenhagen summit."

            Dr Williams said: "This is an important meeting - the first of its kind
            in the UK. We all have to do more to face the challenges of climate
            change. Faith communities have a crucial role to play. That was
            highlighted today as were some of the things already being done. We must
            do our bit and encourage others to do theirs. Together we can and we
            will make a difference".

            The full text of the statement is below:

            Statement by Faith Leaders and participants in the Faith and Climate
            Change Seminar hosted by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace,
            29 October 2009

            As leaders and representatives of faith communities and faith-based
            organisations in the UK we wish to highlight the very real threat to the
            world's poor, and to our fragile creation, from the threat of
            catastrophic climate change. The developed world is primarily
            responsible for the already visible effects of global heating. Justice
            requires that we now take responsibility for slowing the rise in global
            temperature. We call upon UK negotiators at Copenhagen, and the other
            nations of the G20 in particular, to fight for a deal which speedily
            ends unsustainable reliance on fossil fuels and puts in place urgent
            measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so that global temperature
            rise may be kept within two degrees centigrade.

            We recognise unequivocally that there is a moral imperative to tackle
            the causes of global warming. This is reinforced by the reality that it
            is the poor and vulnerable who are most profoundly affected by the
            environmental impact of climate change - especially drought, floods,
            water shortages and rise in sea levels. Faith communities have a crucial
            role to play in pressing for changes in behaviour at every level of
            society and in every economic sector. We all have a responsibility to
            learn how to live and develop sustainably in a world of finite
            resources.

            This responsibility comes into sharp focus today with less than 40 days
            before representatives of governments from across the world meet to
            agree a deal on climate change.

            Building on the examples of local and international action to live and
            to work together sustainably which have been highlighted in our meeting
            today we pledge to:

            *Reach out to our communities, both in the UK and internationally, in
            the coming weeks to raise awareness of the real potential for
            catastrophic climate change and to increase public support for an
            ambitious, fair and effective deal at Copenhagen;
            *Continue to share best practice and redouble our efforts to reduce
            emissions that result from our institutional and individual activities;
            *Work with our partners, our sister churches and communities
            internationally to mitigate the effects of climate change on the poorest
            and most vulnerable communities in the developing world; and to press
            governments to support that effort.

            To help to achieve these ends we agree to use today's meeting as the
            first step in an ongoing process of collaboration. We believe our
            communities can be key agents of change and urge the Government wherever
            possible to support our efforts to build capacity and commitment to
            reduce carbon emissions, raise awareness and promote sustainable
            practice.

            Ends

            Notes to editors:

            Podcasts from the event are available here:
            www.archbishopofcan terbury.org/ 2583

            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
            ACNSlist, published by Anglican Communion News Service, London, is
            distributed to more than 8,000 journalists and other readers around
            the world.

            For subscription INFORMATION please go to:
            http://www.anglican communion. org/acns/ help/acnslist. cfm
          • TGGeko
            ... Is it not our duty to take care of the Earth? If the churches teach this too, how is it bad? ... I don t think you understand what people are doing. They
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009
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              > Some liberal churches are getting seriously sidetracked from their duty to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus

              Is it not our duty to take care of the Earth? If the churches teach this too, how is it bad?

              > Most conservative churches ridicule the diversion from Gospel teaching to this new "environmental gospel'.

              I don't think you understand what people are doing. They aren't just throwing out the bible and preaching "An Inconvenient Truth" to people. They are supplementing the bible with a more environmentally conscious attitude. It's a change in attitude, not teachings.

              >The hard scientific fact is that our planet earth has been in a normal, cyclical period of global cooling for about 12 years to date.

              All facts can and must be substantiated. Show us a study supporting what you say.

              >since all planets heat or cool together, the obvious cause is the variations of solar energy.

              If you could demonstrate this, it would be very very helpful in your argument.

              >Solar panels, windmills and ethanol fuel are not efficient.

              Yet. There has been a steady increase in the efficiency of solar panels. Furthermore, many scientists speculate that a "breakthrough" is nearing.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photovoltaic_power_cell#Third_generation

              Watch out for those substantiations, those have been known to enlighten.

              >The only scientific and logic solution to the serious shortage of energy worldwide is to have huge programs of R & D to produce more advanced nuclear fission and nuclear fusion electrical generating power plants.

              While I do feel that efforts should be channeled into these avenues, Solar, Wind, Geothermal, Tidal, and Biofuel are already available to us. Perhaps we should also

              --- In Christian-Philosophy@yahoogroups.com, Brother Dave <truthist@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks Steve for bringing this up.
              >  
              > Some liberal churches are getting seriously sidetracked from their duty to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus - our sonship with God - to a much lesser and frivolous "environmental gospel" or "green gospel". "Climate change is a part of this foolishness.
              >  
              > The hard scientific fact is that our planet earth has been in a normal, cyclical period of global cooling for about 12 years to date. Our sun has normal, cyclic variations of energy output, which slightly increase average temperatures of all of the planets in our solar system. If humans here were responsible for "global warming" or "global cooling", only the earth would have these small temperature variations, and NOT all of our planets in our solar system !  Since all planets heat or cool together, the obvious cause is the variations of solar energy.
              >  
              > One good trend is that these liberal, leftist, political, environmental churches are losing members.  Most conservative churches ridicule the diversion from Gospel teaching to this new "environmental gospel'. 
              >  
              > The only scientific and logic solution to the serious shortage of energy worldwide is to have huge programs of R & D to produce more advanced nuclear fission and nuclear fusion electrical generating power plants.  Solar panels, windmills and ethanol fuel are not efficient. Our country does have an advanced nuclear fusion and laser program; but few have heard about it, and the media does not cover it much; even though there is this website on the USA National Ignition Facility  https://lasers.llnl.gov/%c2%a0%c2%a0 Check it out.
              >
              > Peace and progress in Spirit and in Truth,
              >
              > Brother Dave
              >
              > http://www.LedByJesus.org/%c2%a0%c2%a0%c2%a0our newest Christian website
              >
              > http://www.PureChristians.org/%c2%a0Gospel enlarging website,
              > proclaiming worldwide the True Religion
              > OF JESUS and ABOUT JESUS and IN JESUS
              >
              > Come learn and share !
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: "Sbkidde@..." <Sbkidde@...>
              > To: Christian-Philosophy@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Mon, November 2, 2009 12:51:17 PM
              > Subject: [Christian-Philosophy] Moral Imperative
              >
              >  
              > Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church.
              >  
              > sbk
              >
              > Faith leaders - tackling climate change is a "moral imperative"
              >
              > Posted On : October 30, 2009 3:25 PM | Posted By : Admin ACO
              > Related Categories: Lambeth
              >
              > ACNS: http://aco.org/ acns/news. cfm/2009/ 10/30/ACNS4664
              >
              > The Archbishop of Canterbury hosted a meeting of faith leaders and
              > faith-based and community organisations at Lambeth Palace to discuss the
              > response of faith communities to the environmental crisis. With 40 days
              > to go before the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit the participants have
              > pledged to work together to raise awareness about the effects of
              > 'catastrophic climate change' on the world's poor and to take whatever
              > action they can to "to reduce carbon emissions and promote sustainable
              > practice." At the meeting a number of presentations highlighted the kind
              > of action faith communities and faith-based organisations were already
              > taking in the UK and with partners overseas.
              >
              > In the first statement of its kind, signed by leaders from every faith
              > community (including Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist,
              > Baha'i, Jain and Zoastrian) the signatories recognise "unequivocally
              > that there is a moral imperative to tackle the causes of global warming"
              > and that "Faith communities have a crucial role to play in pressing for
              > changes in behaviour at every level of society and in every economic
              > sector. We all have a responsibility to learn how to live and develop
              > sustainably in a world of finite resources".
              >
              > They call for the UK government and G20 governments in particular to
              > fight for an ambitious deal which offers hope of rises in global
              > temperature being kept within two degrees centigrade.
              >
              > The statement has been welcomed by the Department for Energy and Climate
              > Change (DECC). The Secretary of State Ed Miliband said: "Tackling
              > climate change is a cause that unites people of all faiths. Each
              > generation holds the planet in trust for the next and to fulfil our
              > obligations to these future generations, we must succeed in getting a
              > fair and ambitious agreement. We need the voice of all the world's
              > religions in the coming weeks as we approach the Copenhagen summit."
              >
              > Dr Williams said: "This is an important meeting - the first of its kind
              > in the UK. We all have to do more to face the challenges of climate
              > change. Faith communities have a crucial role to play. That was
              > highlighted today as were some of the things already being done. We must
              > do our bit and encourage others to do theirs. Together we can and we
              > will make a difference".
              >
              > The full text of the statement is below:
              >
              > Statement by Faith Leaders and participants in the Faith and Climate
              > Change Seminar hosted by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace,
              > 29 October 2009
              >
              > As leaders and representatives of faith communities and faith-based
              > organisations in the UK we wish to highlight the very real threat to the
              > world's poor, and to our fragile creation, from the threat of
              > catastrophic climate change. The developed world is primarily
              > responsible for the already visible effects of global heating. Justice
              > requires that we now take responsibility for slowing the rise in global
              > temperature. We call upon UK negotiators at Copenhagen, and the other
              > nations of the G20 in particular, to fight for a deal which speedily
              > ends unsustainable reliance on fossil fuels and puts in place urgent
              > measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so that global temperature
              > rise may be kept within two degrees centigrade.
              >
              > We recognise unequivocally that there is a moral imperative to tackle
              > the causes of global warming. This is reinforced by the reality that it
              > is the poor and vulnerable who are most profoundly affected by the
              > environmental impact of climate change - especially drought, floods,
              > water shortages and rise in sea levels. Faith communities have a crucial
              > role to play in pressing for changes in behaviour at every level of
              > society and in every economic sector. We all have a responsibility to
              > learn how to live and develop sustainably in a world of finite
              > resources.
              >
              > This responsibility comes into sharp focus today with less than 40 days
              > before representatives of governments from across the world meet to
              > agree a deal on climate change.
              >
              > Building on the examples of local and international action to live and
              > to work together sustainably which have been highlighted in our meeting
              > today we pledge to:
              >
              > *Reach out to our communities, both in the UK and internationally, in
              > the coming weeks to raise awareness of the real potential for
              > catastrophic climate change and to increase public support for an
              > ambitious, fair and effective deal at Copenhagen;
              > *Continue to share best practice and redouble our efforts to reduce
              > emissions that result from our institutional and individual activities;
              > *Work with our partners, our sister churches and communities
              > internationally to mitigate the effects of climate change on the poorest
              > and most vulnerable communities in the developing world; and to press
              > governments to support that effort.
              >
              > To help to achieve these ends we agree to use today's meeting as the
              > first step in an ongoing process of collaboration. We believe our
              > communities can be key agents of change and urge the Government wherever
              > possible to support our efforts to build capacity and commitment to
              > reduce carbon emissions, raise awareness and promote sustainable
              > practice.
              >
              > Ends
              >
              > Notes to editors:
              >
              > Podcasts from the event are available here:
              > www.archbishopofcan terbury.org/ 2583
              >
              > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
              > ACNSlist, published by Anglican Communion News Service, London, is
              > distributed to more than 8,000 journalists and other readers around
              > the world.
              >
              > For subscription INFORMATION please go to:
              > http://www.anglican communion. org/acns/ help/acnslist. cfm
              >
            • Sbkidde@aol.com
              Don t mention it, Big D., I anticipated your response. It made me feel so....scientific. Ho! ho! ho! It can be observed that the gospel of Jesus cares about
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009
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                Don't mention it, Big D.,
                 
                I anticipated your response. It made me feel so....scientific. Ho! ho! ho!
                 
                It can be observed that the gospel of Jesus cares about the condition of the earth. It is God's creation and we are charged with the responsibility of acting as its stewards.
                 
                Steve K.
                 
                In a message dated 11/2/2009 7:42:59 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, truthist@... writes:
                Thanks Steve for bringing this up.
                 
                Some liberal churches are getting seriously sidetracked from their duty to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus - our sonship with God - to a much lesser and frivolous "environmental gospel" or "green gospel". "Climate change is a part of this foolishness.
                 
                The hard scientific fact is that our planet earth has been in a normal, cyclical period of global cooling for about 12 years to date. Our sun has normal, cyclic variations of energy output, which slightly increase average temperatures of all of the planets in our solar system. If humans here were responsible for "global warming" or "global cooling", only the earth would have these small temperature variations, and NOT all of our planets in our solar system !  Since all planets heat or cool together, the obvious cause is the variations of solar energy.
                 
                One good trend is that these liberal, leftist, political, environmental churches are losing members.  Most conservative churches ridicule the diversion from Gospel teaching to this new "environmental gospel'. 
                 
                The only scientific and logic solution to the serious shortage of energy worldwide is to have huge programs of R & D to produce more advanced nuclear fission and nuclear fusion electrical generating power plants.  Solar panels, windmills and ethanol fuel are not efficient. Our country does have an advanced nuclear fusion and laser program; but few have heard about it, and the media does not cover it much; even though there is this website on the USA National Ignition Facility  https://lasers. llnl.gov/   Check it out.
                 
                Peace and progress in Spirit and in Truth,
                 
                Brother Dave
                 
              • Sbkidde@aol.com
                I didn t suppose that anyone would rejoice in the fact that a number of Faith leaders agreed that tackling climate change is a moral imperative. It is a
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009
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                  I didn't suppose that anyone would rejoice in the fact that a number of Faith leaders agreed that tackling climate change is a moral imperative. It is a miracle in its own right!
                   
                  Still all Big D. and Little G can do is blahsez blahsez about it. Sheesh! This is earth shaking news! Feel the world move beneath your feet people! Come on!
                   
                  Steve K.
                   
                  In a message dated 11/2/2009 7:11:30 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, thegreengeko@... writes:
                  Everyone knows that humans are causing global warming, so I say get rid of them. All of them.

                  But seriously, this isn't a problem that I worry about. I do, however recognize the need for cleaner energy. It's just good engineering to have efficient sources of power. Even if humans are causing it, the "green movement" will be good in that it will encourage such leaps in engineering and technology.

                  --- In Christian-Philosoph y@yahoogroups. com, Sbkidde@... wrote:
                  >
                  > Please read the following press release from the Anglican Church.
                  >
                  > sbk
                  >
                  > Faith leaders - tackling climate change is a "moral imperative"
                  >
                  > Posted On : October 30, 2009 3:25 PM | Posted By : Admin ACO
                  > Related Categories: Lambeth
                   
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