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Re: Chinese Values

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  • juanjuan
    ... lol. Jieming, what does that suppose to mean? :-) (see i got one too. :) ) ... Chinese ... Korean ... attract ... dramas. ... Chinese ... has ...
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2005
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      --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "liang_jieming"
      <kitmengleong@y...> wrote:
      >
      > :-)



      lol. Jieming, what does that suppose to mean? :-) (see i got one
      too. :) )





      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "juanjuan"
      > <yijane01@m...> wrote:
      > >
      > > What Does 'Hallyu' Mean for China?
      > >
      > >
      > > By Cai Peng-Hong
      > >
      > > It was quite a surprise to me when I heard that my mother, a
      Chinese
      > > woman in her eighties, had been deeply impressed by the South
      Korean
      > > television drama ``Jewel in the Palace (Taejanggum).¡¯¡¯
      > >
      > > After watching the drama, she said: ``Nothing else on TV will
      attract
      > > me any more.¡¯¡¯
      > >
      > > Until then, my mother had been a fan of traditional Chinese
      dramas.
      > > But she had certainly never claimed herself to be among the
      Chinese
      > > fans surfing the ``Korean Wave,¡¯¡¯ the cultural phenomenon that
      has
      > > been growing strongly here since the year 2000, kindled
      particularly
      > > by ``Winter Sonata¡¯¡¯ broadcast by Chinese public television in
      > > early 2003.
      > >
      > > It seems that my mum has leaped onto the Korean Wave too.
      > >
      > > The Korean Wave has been viewed by television stations in China
      as a
      > > business, an opportunity to derive financial advantage. However,
      its
      > > social, spiritual and cultural influence on Chinese society is
      unique
      > > and also deserves attention. Chinese television viewers¡¯
      reaction to
      > > Korean cultural exports has exposed unexpected emotions, a
      complex
      > > sign indicating Chinese perceptions toward their own cultural
      roots
      > > and that of their neighboring country after its economic
      emergence as
      > > one of the Asian dragons.
      > >
      > > ``Jewel in the Palace¡¯¡¯ tells the story of Janggum, who
      struggles
      > > in her life to develop from a child fugitive to a court lady and
      > > finally the first female royal physician. This story seems to
      have
      > > touched the hearts of millions and millions of Chinese people who
      > > waited untill the middle of the night to watch the show, despite
      > > having to get up early the next morning for work.
      > >
      > > But this kind of story should not have been strange or surprising
      for
      > > Chinese people. Why is it that ``Jewel in the Palace,¡¯¡¯ as well
      as
      > > other South Korean TV dramas, are so popular in China? There were
      > > three other South Korea Korean dramas broadcast nationwide at
      almost
      > > the same time.
      > >
      > > According to my mother¡¯s account, South Korean dramas show the
      > > spirit of hard work, loyalty in love, strong family ties and a
      > > society filled with a deep respect for seniors and parents.
      > >
      > > Encouraged by my mum, I also took the time to watch the drama and
      > > found it to be a very precious experience. I held my breath and
      never
      > > stopped watching until the end.
      > >
      > > What Korean society still cherishes seems to me to be those
      essential
      > > values that we Chinese initiated and upheld throughout our long
      > > history. Those precious values have been regretfully forgotten or
      > > overlooked in modern China. But as soon as they were illustrated
      on
      > > the screen, we were touched because they remind us of something
      > > distant or long past, while still being familiar and very much
      needed.
      > >
      > > The significant effect that ``Jewel in the Palace¡¯¡¯ and other
      South
      > > Korean television dramas are having on Chinese society is closely
      > > related to their excellent production, with sensational plots,
      fine
      > > cinematography, and talented and beautiful actors and actress.
      Such
      > > conscientious production needs a hard-working and customer-driven
      > > attitude toward creating dramas.
      > >
      > > Probably due to the destruction of our own values, which some
      Chinese
      > > actors or actresses have no idea of, these local celebrities felt
      > > unhappy at Chinese audiences becoming fond of South Korean
      television
      > > dramas and even impolitely criticized ``Jewel in the Palace.¡¯¡¯
      This
      > > is very regrettable and shows their insecurity. We Chinese should
      > > remember South Korea is not only one of the Asian dragons, but
      also
      > > an emerging neighbor in culture.
      > >
      > > Cai Peng-Hong is a senior fellow and director of the APEC
      Research
      > > Center, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. Contact:
      > > paulcai@o... _ ED.
      > >
      >
    • liang_jieming
      Hi Jane, That s called a knowing smile. ;-) The article is what I ve been trying to say all this while about chinese cultural traditions and practices on the
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2005
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        Hi Jane,

        That's called a knowing smile. ;-) The article is what I've been
        trying to say all this while about chinese cultural traditions and
        practices on the mainland vs. in the overseas chinese.

        Jieming
        DragonSeedLegacy
        ChineseCultureOnline


        --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "juanjuan"
        <yijane01@m...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "liang_jieming"
        > <kitmengleong@y...> wrote:
        > >
        > > :-)
        >
        >
        >
        > lol. Jieming, what does that suppose to mean? :-) (see i got one
        > too. :) )
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "juanjuan"
        > > <yijane01@m...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > What Does 'Hallyu' Mean for China?
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > By Cai Peng-Hong
        > > >
        > > > It was quite a surprise to me when I heard that my mother, a
        > Chinese
        > > > woman in her eighties, had been deeply impressed by the South
        > Korean
        > > > television drama ``Jewel in the Palace (Taejanggum).¡¯¡¯
        > > >
        > > > After watching the drama, she said: ``Nothing else on TV will
        > attract
        > > > me any more.¡¯¡¯
        > > >
        > > > Until then, my mother had been a fan of traditional Chinese
        > dramas.
        > > > But she had certainly never claimed herself to be among the
        > Chinese
        > > > fans surfing the ``Korean Wave,¡¯¡¯ the cultural phenomenon that
        > has
        > > > been growing strongly here since the year 2000, kindled
        > particularly
        > > > by ``Winter Sonata¡¯¡¯ broadcast by Chinese public television in
        > > > early 2003.
        > > >
        > > > It seems that my mum has leaped onto the Korean Wave too.
        > > >
        > > > The Korean Wave has been viewed by television stations in China
        > as a
        > > > business, an opportunity to derive financial advantage. However,
        > its
        > > > social, spiritual and cultural influence on Chinese society is
        > unique
        > > > and also deserves attention. Chinese television viewers¡¯
        > reaction to
        > > > Korean cultural exports has exposed unexpected emotions, a
        > complex
        > > > sign indicating Chinese perceptions toward their own cultural
        > roots
        > > > and that of their neighboring country after its economic
        > emergence as
        > > > one of the Asian dragons.
        > > >
        > > > ``Jewel in the Palace¡¯¡¯ tells the story of Janggum, who
        > struggles
        > > > in her life to develop from a child fugitive to a court lady and
        > > > finally the first female royal physician. This story seems to
        > have
        > > > touched the hearts of millions and millions of Chinese people who
        > > > waited untill the middle of the night to watch the show, despite
        > > > having to get up early the next morning for work.
        > > >
        > > > But this kind of story should not have been strange or surprising
        > for
        > > > Chinese people. Why is it that ``Jewel in the Palace,¡¯¡¯ as well
        > as
        > > > other South Korean TV dramas, are so popular in China? There were
        > > > three other South Korea Korean dramas broadcast nationwide at
        > almost
        > > > the same time.
        > > >
        > > > According to my mother¡¯s account, South Korean dramas show the
        > > > spirit of hard work, loyalty in love, strong family ties and a
        > > > society filled with a deep respect for seniors and parents.
        > > >
        > > > Encouraged by my mum, I also took the time to watch the drama and
        > > > found it to be a very precious experience. I held my breath and
        > never
        > > > stopped watching until the end.
        > > >
        > > > What Korean society still cherishes seems to me to be those
        > essential
        > > > values that we Chinese initiated and upheld throughout our long
        > > > history. Those precious values have been regretfully forgotten or
        > > > overlooked in modern China. But as soon as they were illustrated
        > on
        > > > the screen, we were touched because they remind us of something
        > > > distant or long past, while still being familiar and very much
        > needed.
        > > >
        > > > The significant effect that ``Jewel in the Palace¡¯¡¯ and other
        > South
        > > > Korean television dramas are having on Chinese society is closely
        > > > related to their excellent production, with sensational plots,
        > fine
        > > > cinematography, and talented and beautiful actors and actress.
        > Such
        > > > conscientious production needs a hard-working and customer-driven
        > > > attitude toward creating dramas.
        > > >
        > > > Probably due to the destruction of our own values, which some
        > Chinese
        > > > actors or actresses have no idea of, these local celebrities felt
        > > > unhappy at Chinese audiences becoming fond of South Korean
        > television
        > > > dramas and even impolitely criticized ``Jewel in the Palace.¡¯¡¯
        > This
        > > > is very regrettable and shows their insecurity. We Chinese should
        > > > remember South Korea is not only one of the Asian dragons, but
        > also
        > > > an emerging neighbor in culture.
        > > >
        > > > Cai Peng-Hong is a senior fellow and director of the APEC
        > Research
        > > > Center, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. Contact:
        > > > paulcai@o... _ ED.
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • juanjuan
        yes, yes, i also heard even in Malaysia the Chinese there seems to have more traditional Confucian values and the people are so seen polite. we the youngsters
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2005
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          yes, yes, i also heard even in Malaysia the Chinese there seems to
          have more traditional Confucian values and the people are so seen
          polite. we the youngsters have abandoned much of those confucian
          manners and China doesnot like China but some South East Asian
          countries more like China. lol. shhhh....some of us are like "wild
          rats". heheh... got to improve. :)

          Jane

          --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "liang_jieming"
          <kitmengleong@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jane,
          >
          > That's called a knowing smile. ;-) The article is what I've been
          > trying to say all this while about chinese cultural traditions and
          > practices on the mainland vs. in the overseas chinese.
          >
          > Jieming
          > DragonSeedLegacy
          > ChineseCultureOnline
          >
          >
          > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "juanjuan"
          > <yijane01@m...> wrote:
          > >
          > > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "liang_jieming"
          > > <kitmengleong@y...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > :-)
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > lol. Jieming, what does that suppose to mean? :-) (see i got one
          > > too. :) )
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "juanjuan"
          > > > <yijane01@m...> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > What Does 'Hallyu' Mean for China?
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > By Cai Peng-Hong
          > > > >
          > > > > It was quite a surprise to me when I heard that my mother, a
          > > Chinese
          > > > > woman in her eighties, had been deeply impressed by the South
          > > Korean
          > > > > television drama ``Jewel in the Palace (Taejanggum).¡¯¡¯
          > > > >
          > > > > After watching the drama, she said: ``Nothing else on TV will
          > > attract
          > > > > me any more.¡¯¡¯
          > > > >
          > > > > Until then, my mother had been a fan of traditional Chinese
          > > dramas.
          > > > > But she had certainly never claimed herself to be among the
          > > Chinese
          > > > > fans surfing the ``Korean Wave,¡¯¡¯ the cultural phenomenon
          that
          > > has
          > > > > been growing strongly here since the year 2000, kindled
          > > particularly
          > > > > by ``Winter Sonata¡¯¡¯ broadcast by Chinese public television
          in
          > > > > early 2003.
          > > > >
          > > > > It seems that my mum has leaped onto the Korean Wave too.
          > > > >
          > > > > The Korean Wave has been viewed by television stations in
          China
          > > as a
          > > > > business, an opportunity to derive financial advantage.
          However,
          > > its
          > > > > social, spiritual and cultural influence on Chinese society
          is
          > > unique
          > > > > and also deserves attention. Chinese television viewers¡¯
          > > reaction to
          > > > > Korean cultural exports has exposed unexpected emotions, a
          > > complex
          > > > > sign indicating Chinese perceptions toward their own cultural
          > > roots
          > > > > and that of their neighboring country after its economic
          > > emergence as
          > > > > one of the Asian dragons.
          > > > >
          > > > > ``Jewel in the Palace¡¯¡¯ tells the story of Janggum, who
          > > struggles
          > > > > in her life to develop from a child fugitive to a court lady
          and
          > > > > finally the first female royal physician. This story seems to
          > > have
          > > > > touched the hearts of millions and millions of Chinese people
          who
          > > > > waited untill the middle of the night to watch the show,
          despite
          > > > > having to get up early the next morning for work.
          > > > >
          > > > > But this kind of story should not have been strange or
          surprising
          > > for
          > > > > Chinese people. Why is it that ``Jewel in the Palace,¡¯¡¯ as
          well
          > > as
          > > > > other South Korean TV dramas, are so popular in China? There
          were
          > > > > three other South Korea Korean dramas broadcast nationwide at
          > > almost
          > > > > the same time.
          > > > >
          > > > > According to my mother¡¯s account, South Korean dramas show
          the
          > > > > spirit of hard work, loyalty in love, strong family ties and
          a
          > > > > society filled with a deep respect for seniors and parents.
          > > > >
          > > > > Encouraged by my mum, I also took the time to watch the drama
          and
          > > > > found it to be a very precious experience. I held my breath
          and
          > > never
          > > > > stopped watching until the end.
          > > > >
          > > > > What Korean society still cherishes seems to me to be those
          > > essential
          > > > > values that we Chinese initiated and upheld throughout our
          long
          > > > > history. Those precious values have been regretfully
          forgotten or
          > > > > overlooked in modern China. But as soon as they were
          illustrated
          > > on
          > > > > the screen, we were touched because they remind us of
          something
          > > > > distant or long past, while still being familiar and very
          much
          > > needed.
          > > > >
          > > > > The significant effect that ``Jewel in the Palace¡¯¡¯ and
          other
          > > South
          > > > > Korean television dramas are having on Chinese society is
          closely
          > > > > related to their excellent production, with sensational
          plots,
          > > fine
          > > > > cinematography, and talented and beautiful actors and
          actress.
          > > Such
          > > > > conscientious production needs a hard-working and customer-
          driven
          > > > > attitude toward creating dramas.
          > > > >
          > > > > Probably due to the destruction of our own values, which some
          > > Chinese
          > > > > actors or actresses have no idea of, these local celebrities
          felt
          > > > > unhappy at Chinese audiences becoming fond of South Korean
          > > television
          > > > > dramas and even impolitely criticized ``Jewel in the
          Palace.¡¯¡¯
          > > This
          > > > > is very regrettable and shows their insecurity. We Chinese
          should
          > > > > remember South Korea is not only one of the Asian dragons,
          but
          > > also
          > > > > an emerging neighbor in culture.
          > > > >
          > > > > Cai Peng-Hong is a senior fellow and director of the APEC
          > > Research
          > > > > Center, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. Contact:
          > > > > paulcai@o... _ ED.
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
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