Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

re: Happy New Year!

Expand Messages
  • Hyde Park
    Yes, Happy New Year to everyone. Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty years ago, New Year s Eve and New Year s Day wasn t a big deal in Hong
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Yes, Happy New Year to everyone.

      Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty
      years ago, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day wasn't a
      big deal in Hong Kong. It was still a holiday, but the
      difference is that not many people gathered at public
      places to do the countdown. The major event then was
      the firing of a cannon along Hong Kong's waterfront,
      which was done by someone rich or famous. It is still
      done every year at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31, but
      it is not the only place to usher in the new year. I
      would say it is probably the 5th or 6th popular now.
      The main places where Hong Kong people like to ring in
      the new year are Lan Kwai Fong, an entertainment and
      dining area which is popular with expats; Times
      Square, a major shopping mall; and Tsimshatsui, along
      the waterfront.

      But I don't agree that New Year's has become more
      important than Chinese New Year. People do the
      countdown because it is a number and they know the
      next number will be "1." In short, it is fun. Most
      Chinese who follow the Chinese calendar treat Jan. 1
      as the 21st day of the eleventh month, meaning the
      next Chinee New Year will begin on Feb. 9. I'm not
      sure what determines when the new Chinese New Year
      begins. Perhaps Jane can shed some light on that.
      Also, what animal is next Chinese New Year?

      Hyde.

      Alexcranieri wrote:

      Ah, just receive email from friend in Australia. It is
      New Year now.

      I have question. My Hong Kong friend told me that 20
      years ago, the Hong Kong people did not take New Year
      very seriously. Few Chinese participate in countdown.
      He said Chinese New Year was big thing and New Year
      was just another day. Only Westerners would celebrate
      New Year in big way.

      But my friend said all this has changed. Maybe because
      of influence from Western culture. Now many Chinese
      celebrate and count down to New Year. It becoming even
      more important than Chinese New Year.

      Alex.
    • John Gerlach
      Ha - even a poor Gwai Loh knows that Chinese New Year is also called the Lunar New Year (Lunar is an adjective from the Latin word for moon) because it is
      Message 2 of 29 , Jan 2, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Ha - even a poor Gwai Loh knows that Chinese New Year is also called the Lunar New Year (Lunar is an adjective from the Latin word for moon) because it is determined by the cycles of the moon which differ from year to year on the Solar Calendar (Solar is the adjective from the Latin word for Sun).
         
        In early times it was easier to calculate time periods by the moon because its four distinct phases were clearly visible - depending on cloud cover :), so the Lunar Calendar was first developed. Only later in history did civilisations develop the Solar Calendar because Astronomers were able to fix the time it took for the Earth to complete each cycle around the Sun, so that the four Solar seasons of Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter could each be allocated three calendar months of the Year.
         
        That is why we also have a Leap Year in the Solar Calendar because it was discovered that the early calculation of 364 days was not quite accurate - more closely 364.25, so they added a day to February every four years to bring the Solar Calendar back into line.
         
        The Western celebration of Easter was also dependent on the Lunar Calendar originally. Even after the Christian Religion took it over as a celebration of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, they retained its Lunar characteristic so that Easter is still celebrated on a different day each year in the Solar Calendar. The Christians call Easter a 'Moveable Feast' as opposed to a Fixed Feast such as Christmas (the supposed birthday of Christ) which is celebrated each year on the 25th of December.
         
        The Chinese (in common with other Lunar Year cultures) have accommodated themselves to the Solar Calendar because of its dominance in business, trade and global communications, but the Lunar New Year easily remains the most important event of their year wherever they happen to be in the World. This is true in Hong Kong, Beijing, Sydney or even New York.
         
        Well, at least we have two opportunities to wish everyone 'San Nin Fai Lok' or Happy New Year!
         
        John
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Hyde Park
        Sent: Sunday, 2 January 2005 1:52 AM
        Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] re: Happy New Year!

        Yes, Happy New Year to everyone.

        Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty
        years ago, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day wasn't a
        big deal in Hong Kong. It was still a holiday, but the
        difference is that not many people gathered at public
        places to do the countdown. The major event then was
        the firing of a cannon along Hong Kong's waterfront,
        which was done by someone rich or famous. It is still
        done every year at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31, but
        it is not the only place to usher in the new year. I
        would say it is probably the 5th or 6th popular now.
        The main places where Hong Kong people like to ring in
        the new year are Lan Kwai Fong, an entertainment and
        dining area which is popular with expats; Times
        Square, a major shopping mall; and Tsimshatsui, along
        the waterfront.

        But I don't agree that New Year's has become more
        important than Chinese New Year. People do the
        countdown because it is a number and they know the
        next number will be "1." In short, it is fun. Most
        Chinese who follow the Chinese calendar treat Jan. 1
        as the 21st day of the eleventh month, meaning the
        next Chinee New Year will begin on Feb. 9. I'm not
        sure what determines when the new Chinese New Year
        begins. Perhaps Jane can shed some light on that.
        Also, what animal is next Chinese New Year?

        Hyde.

        Alexcranieri wrote:

        Ah, just receive email from friend in Australia. It is
        New Year now.

        I have question. My Hong Kong friend told me that 20
        years ago, the Hong Kong people did not take New Year
        very seriously. Few Chinese participate in countdown.
        He said Chinese New Year was big thing and New Year
        was just another day. Only Westerners would celebrate
        New Year in big way.

        But my friend said all this has changed. Maybe because
        of influence from Western culture. Now many Chinese
        celebrate and count down to New Year. It becoming even
        more important than Chinese New Year.

        Alex.

      • liang_jieming
        Thanks for the explanation of the basis for the lunar based date for the Chinese New Year John. Just to add to this and answer the question raised, next year
        Message 3 of 29 , Jan 2, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for the explanation of the basis for the lunar based date for
          the Chinese New Year John.

          Just to add to this and answer the question raised, next year is the
          year of the Rooster.

          Jieming
          DragonSeedLegacy
          ChineseCultureOnline

          --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "John Gerlach"
          <firedog_hk@h...> wrote:
          > Ha - even a poor Gwai Loh knows that Chinese New Year is also called
          the Lunar New Year (Lunar is an adjective from the Latin word for
          moon) because it is determined by the cycles of the moon which differ
          from year to year on the Solar Calendar (Solar is the adjective from
          the Latin word for Sun).
          >
          > In early times it was easier to calculate time periods by the moon
          because its four distinct phases were clearly visible - depending on
          cloud cover :), so the Lunar Calendar was first developed. Only later
          in history did civilisations develop the Solar Calendar because
          Astronomers were able to fix the time it took for the Earth to
          complete each cycle around the Sun, so that the four Solar seasons of
          Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter could each be allocated three
          calendar months of the Year.
          >
          > That is why we also have a Leap Year in the Solar Calendar because
          it was discovered that the early calculation of 364 days was not quite
          accurate - more closely 364.25, so they added a day to February every
          four years to bring the Solar Calendar back into line.
          >
          > The Western celebration of Easter was also dependent on the Lunar
          Calendar originally. Even after the Christian Religion took it over as
          a celebration of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, they
          retained its Lunar characteristic so that Easter is still celebrated
          on a different day each year in the Solar Calendar. The Christians
          call Easter a 'Moveable Feast' as opposed to a Fixed Feast such as
          Christmas (the supposed birthday of Christ) which is celebrated each
          year on the 25th of December.
          >
          > The Chinese (in common with other Lunar Year cultures) have
          accommodated themselves to the Solar Calendar because of its dominance
          in business, trade and global communications, but the Lunar New Year
          easily remains the most important event of their year wherever they
          happen to be in the World. This is true in Hong Kong, Beijing, Sydney
          or even New York.
          >
          > Well, at least we have two opportunities to wish everyone 'San Nin
          Fai Lok' or Happy New Year!
          >
          > John
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Hyde Park
          > To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sunday, 2 January 2005 1:52 AM
          > Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] re: Happy New Year!
          >
          >
          > Yes, Happy New Year to everyone.
          >
          > Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty
          > years ago, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day wasn't a
          > big deal in Hong Kong. It was still a holiday, but the
          > difference is that not many people gathered at public
          > places to do the countdown. The major event then was
          > the firing of a cannon along Hong Kong's waterfront,
          > which was done by someone rich or famous. It is still
          > done every year at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31, but
          > it is not the only place to usher in the new year. I
          > would say it is probably the 5th or 6th popular now.
          > The main places where Hong Kong people like to ring in
          > the new year are Lan Kwai Fong, an entertainment and
          > dining area which is popular with expats; Times
          > Square, a major shopping mall; and Tsimshatsui, along
          > the waterfront.
          >
          > But I don't agree that New Year's has become more
          > important than Chinese New Year. People do the
          > countdown because it is a number and they know the
          > next number will be "1." In short, it is fun. Most
          > Chinese who follow the Chinese calendar treat Jan. 1
          > as the 21st day of the eleventh month, meaning the
          > next Chinee New Year will begin on Feb. 9. I'm not
          > sure what determines when the new Chinese New Year
          > begins. Perhaps Jane can shed some light on that.
          > Also, what animal is next Chinese New Year?
          >
          > Hyde.
          >
          > Alexcranieri wrote:
          >
          > Ah, just receive email from friend in Australia. It is
          > New Year now.
          >
          > I have question. My Hong Kong friend told me that 20
          > years ago, the Hong Kong people did not take New Year
          > very seriously. Few Chinese participate in countdown.
          > He said Chinese New Year was big thing and New Year
          > was just another day. Only Westerners would celebrate
          > New Year in big way.
          >
          > But my friend said all this has changed. Maybe because
          > of influence from Western culture. Now many Chinese
          > celebrate and count down to New Year. It becoming even
          > more important than Chinese New Year.
          >
          > Alex.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChineseCultureOnline/
          >
          > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > ChineseCultureOnline-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.
        • ming18ming2003
          hi John! A lot of times I am amazed at how much the gwailos know about the Chinese things. Now don t be surprised that you indeed know so much about China. :)
          Message 4 of 29 , Jan 5, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            hi John!

            A lot of times I am amazed at how much the gwailos know about the
            Chinese things. Now don't be surprised that you indeed know so much
            about China. :)

            Thanks for sharing!

            Happy New Year to you and all!

            Jane :)



            --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "John Gerlach"
            <firedog_hk@h...> wrote:
            > Ha - even a poor Gwai Loh knows that Chinese New Year is also
            called the Lunar New Year (Lunar is an adjective from the Latin word
            for moon) because it is determined by the cycles of the moon which
            differ from year to year on the Solar Calendar (Solar is the
            adjective from the Latin word for Sun).
            >
            > In early times it was easier to calculate time periods by the moon
            because its four distinct phases were clearly visible - depending on
            cloud cover :), so the Lunar Calendar was first developed. Only later
            in history did civilisations develop the Solar Calendar because
            Astronomers were able to fix the time it took for the Earth to
            complete each cycle around the Sun, so that the four Solar seasons of
            Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter could each be allocated three
            calendar months of the Year.
            >
            > That is why we also have a Leap Year in the Solar Calendar because
            it was discovered that the early calculation of 364 days was not
            quite accurate - more closely 364.25, so they added a day to February
            every four years to bring the Solar Calendar back into line.
            >
            > The Western celebration of Easter was also dependent on the Lunar
            Calendar originally. Even after the Christian Religion took it over
            as a celebration of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, they
            retained its Lunar characteristic so that Easter is still celebrated
            on a different day each year in the Solar Calendar. The Christians
            call Easter a 'Moveable Feast' as opposed to a Fixed Feast such as
            Christmas (the supposed birthday of Christ) which is celebrated each
            year on the 25th of December.
            >
            > The Chinese (in common with other Lunar Year cultures) have
            accommodated themselves to the Solar Calendar because of its
            dominance in business, trade and global communications, but the Lunar
            New Year easily remains the most important event of their year
            wherever they happen to be in the World. This is true in Hong Kong,
            Beijing, Sydney or even New York.
            >
            > Well, at least we have two opportunities to wish everyone 'San Nin
            Fai Lok' or Happy New Year!
            >
            > John
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Hyde Park
            > To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Sunday, 2 January 2005 1:52 AM
            > Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] re: Happy New Year!
            >
            >
            > Yes, Happy New Year to everyone.
            >
            > Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty
            > years ago, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day wasn't a
            > big deal in Hong Kong. It was still a holiday, but the
            > difference is that not many people gathered at public
            > places to do the countdown. The major event then was
            > the firing of a cannon along Hong Kong's waterfront,
            > which was done by someone rich or famous. It is still
            > done every year at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31, but
            > it is not the only place to usher in the new year. I
            > would say it is probably the 5th or 6th popular now.
            > The main places where Hong Kong people like to ring in
            > the new year are Lan Kwai Fong, an entertainment and
            > dining area which is popular with expats; Times
            > Square, a major shopping mall; and Tsimshatsui, along
            > the waterfront.
            >
            > But I don't agree that New Year's has become more
            > important than Chinese New Year. People do the
            > countdown because it is a number and they know the
            > next number will be "1." In short, it is fun. Most
            > Chinese who follow the Chinese calendar treat Jan. 1
            > as the 21st day of the eleventh month, meaning the
            > next Chinee New Year will begin on Feb. 9. I'm not
            > sure what determines when the new Chinese New Year
            > begins. Perhaps Jane can shed some light on that.
            > Also, what animal is next Chinese New Year?
            >
            > Hyde.
            >
            > Alexcranieri wrote:
            >
            > Ah, just receive email from friend in Australia. It is
            > New Year now.
            >
            > I have question. My Hong Kong friend told me that 20
            > years ago, the Hong Kong people did not take New Year
            > very seriously. Few Chinese participate in countdown.
            > He said Chinese New Year was big thing and New Year
            > was just another day. Only Westerners would celebrate
            > New Year in big way.
            >
            > But my friend said all this has changed. Maybe because
            > of influence from Western culture. Now many Chinese
            > celebrate and count down to New Year. It becoming even
            > more important than Chinese New Year.
            >
            > Alex.
            >
            >
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------
            ----------
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChineseCultureOnline/
            >
            > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > ChineseCultureOnline-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            Service.
          • mikegimbel
            Hi everyone. Just a silly question from a guy that knows to little of China and its culture. I sw the word gwailos in your note, Jane. I am wondering if it
            Message 5 of 29 , Jan 5, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi everyone.

              Just a silly question from a guy that knows to little of China and
              its culture. I sw the word "gwailos" in your note, Jane.

              I am wondering if it means foreigners.

              When I was in Fuzhou I was sometimes called Laowai. Is this a
              similar word?



              --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "ming18ming2003"
              <ming18ming2003@y...> wrote:
              >
              > hi John!
              >
              > A lot of times I am amazed at how much the gwailos know about the
              > Chinese things. Now don't be surprised that you indeed know so
              much
              > about China. :)
              >
              > Thanks for sharing!
              >
              > Happy New Year to you and all!
              >
              > Jane :)
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "John Gerlach"
              > <firedog_hk@h...> wrote:
              > > Ha - even a poor Gwai Loh knows that Chinese New Year is also
              > called the Lunar New Year (Lunar is an adjective from the Latin
              word
              > for moon) because it is determined by the cycles of the moon which
              > differ from year to year on the Solar Calendar (Solar is the
              > adjective from the Latin word for Sun).
              > >
              > > In early times it was easier to calculate time periods by the
              moon
              > because its four distinct phases were clearly visible - depending
              on
              > cloud cover :), so the Lunar Calendar was first developed. Only
              later
              > in history did civilisations develop the Solar Calendar because
              > Astronomers were able to fix the time it took for the Earth to
              > complete each cycle around the Sun, so that the four Solar seasons
              of
              > Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter could each be allocated three
              > calendar months of the Year.
              > >
              > > That is why we also have a Leap Year in the Solar Calendar
              because
              > it was discovered that the early calculation of 364 days was not
              > quite accurate - more closely 364.25, so they added a day to
              February
              > every four years to bring the Solar Calendar back into line.
              > >
              > > The Western celebration of Easter was also dependent on the
              Lunar
              > Calendar originally. Even after the Christian Religion took it
              over
              > as a celebration of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, they
              > retained its Lunar characteristic so that Easter is still
              celebrated
              > on a different day each year in the Solar Calendar. The Christians
              > call Easter a 'Moveable Feast' as opposed to a Fixed Feast such as
              > Christmas (the supposed birthday of Christ) which is celebrated
              each
              > year on the 25th of December.
              > >
              > > The Chinese (in common with other Lunar Year cultures) have
              > accommodated themselves to the Solar Calendar because of its
              > dominance in business, trade and global communications, but the
              Lunar
              > New Year easily remains the most important event of their year
              > wherever they happen to be in the World. This is true in Hong
              Kong,
              > Beijing, Sydney or even New York.
              > >
              > > Well, at least we have two opportunities to wish everyone 'San
              Nin
              > Fai Lok' or Happy New Year!
              > >
              > > John
              > >
              > >
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: Hyde Park
              > > To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Sunday, 2 January 2005 1:52 AM
              > > Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] re: Happy New Year!
              > >
              > >
              > > Yes, Happy New Year to everyone.
              > >
              > > Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty
              > > years ago, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day wasn't a
              > > big deal in Hong Kong. It was still a holiday, but the
              > > difference is that not many people gathered at public
              > > places to do the countdown. The major event then was
              > > the firing of a cannon along Hong Kong's waterfront,
              > > which was done by someone rich or famous. It is still
              > > done every year at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31, but
              > > it is not the only place to usher in the new year. I
              > > would say it is probably the 5th or 6th popular now.
              > > The main places where Hong Kong people like to ring in
              > > the new year are Lan Kwai Fong, an entertainment and
              > > dining area which is popular with expats; Times
              > > Square, a major shopping mall; and Tsimshatsui, along
              > > the waterfront.
              > >
              > > But I don't agree that New Year's has become more
              > > important than Chinese New Year. People do the
              > > countdown because it is a number and they know the
              > > next number will be "1." In short, it is fun. Most
              > > Chinese who follow the Chinese calendar treat Jan. 1
              > > as the 21st day of the eleventh month, meaning the
              > > next Chinee New Year will begin on Feb. 9. I'm not
              > > sure what determines when the new Chinese New Year
              > > begins. Perhaps Jane can shed some light on that.
              > > Also, what animal is next Chinese New Year?
              > >
              > > Hyde.
              > >
              > > Alexcranieri wrote:
              > >
              > > Ah, just receive email from friend in Australia. It is
              > > New Year now.
              > >
              > > I have question. My Hong Kong friend told me that 20
              > > years ago, the Hong Kong people did not take New Year
              > > very seriously. Few Chinese participate in countdown.
              > > He said Chinese New Year was big thing and New Year
              > > was just another day. Only Westerners would celebrate
              > > New Year in big way.
              > >
              > > But my friend said all this has changed. Maybe because
              > > of influence from Western culture. Now many Chinese
              > > celebrate and count down to New Year. It becoming even
              > > more important than Chinese New Year.
              > >
              > > Alex.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > -----------------------------------------------------------------
              ---
              > ----------
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChineseCultureOnline/
              > >
              > > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > > ChineseCultureOnline-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
              of
              > Service.
            • Ty
              Ah, Fuzhou has become a mostly Mandarin-speaking city in the last decade. Its local dialect has become more and more obscure.
              Message 6 of 29 , Jan 5, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Ah, Fuzhou has become a mostly Mandarin-speaking city in the last decade.
                Its local dialect has become more and more obscure.


                --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "mikegimbel"
                <mikegimbel@h...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi everyone.
                >
                > Just a silly question from a guy that knows to little of China and
                > its culture. I sw the word "gwailos" in your note, Jane.
                >
                > I am wondering if it means foreigners.
                >
                > When I was in Fuzhou I was sometimes called Laowai. Is this a
                > similar word?
              • John Gerlach
                Yes - and the year after that is my year - the Year of the Dog! ... From: liang_jieming Reply-To:
                Message 7 of 29 , Jan 6, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yes - and the year after that is my year - the Year of the Dog!

                  ----Original Message Follows----
                  From: "liang_jieming" <kitmengleong@...>
                  Reply-To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
                  To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] Re: Happy New Year!
                  Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2005 02:35:49 -0000


                  Thanks for the explanation of the basis for the lunar based date for
                  the Chinese New Year John.

                  Just to add to this and answer the question raised, next year is the
                  year of the Rooster.

                  Jieming
                  DragonSeedLegacy
                  ChineseCultureOnline

                  --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "John Gerlach"
                  <firedog_hk@h...> wrote:
                  > Ha - even a poor Gwai Loh knows that Chinese New Year is also called
                  the Lunar New Year (Lunar is an adjective from the Latin word for
                  moon) because it is determined by the cycles of the moon which differ
                  from year to year on the Solar Calendar (Solar is the adjective from
                  the Latin word for Sun).
                  >
                  > In early times it was easier to calculate time periods by the moon
                  because its four distinct phases were clearly visible - depending on
                  cloud cover :), so the Lunar Calendar was first developed. Only later
                  in history did civilisations develop the Solar Calendar because
                  Astronomers were able to fix the time it took for the Earth to
                  complete each cycle around the Sun, so that the four Solar seasons of
                  Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter could each be allocated three
                  calendar months of the Year.
                  >
                  > That is why we also have a Leap Year in the Solar Calendar because
                  it was discovered that the early calculation of 364 days was not quite
                  accurate - more closely 364.25, so they added a day to February every
                  four years to bring the Solar Calendar back into line.
                  >
                  > The Western celebration of Easter was also dependent on the Lunar
                  Calendar originally. Even after the Christian Religion took it over as
                  a celebration of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, they
                  retained its Lunar characteristic so that Easter is still celebrated
                  on a different day each year in the Solar Calendar. The Christians
                  call Easter a 'Moveable Feast' as opposed to a Fixed Feast such as
                  Christmas (the supposed birthday of Christ) which is celebrated each
                  year on the 25th of December.
                  >
                  > The Chinese (in common with other Lunar Year cultures) have
                  accommodated themselves to the Solar Calendar because of its dominance
                  in business, trade and global communications, but the Lunar New Year
                  easily remains the most important event of their year wherever they
                  happen to be in the World. This is true in Hong Kong, Beijing, Sydney
                  or even New York.
                  >
                  > Well, at least we have two opportunities to wish everyone 'San Nin
                  Fai Lok' or Happy New Year!
                  >
                  > John
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Hyde Park
                  > To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Sunday, 2 January 2005 1:52 AM
                  > Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] re: Happy New Year!
                  >
                  >
                  > Yes, Happy New Year to everyone.
                  >
                  > Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty
                  > years ago, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day wasn't a
                  > big deal in Hong Kong. It was still a holiday, but the
                  > difference is that not many people gathered at public
                  > places to do the countdown. The major event then was
                  > the firing of a cannon along Hong Kong's waterfront,
                  > which was done by someone rich or famous. It is still
                  > done every year at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31, but
                  > it is not the only place to usher in the new year. I
                  > would say it is probably the 5th or 6th popular now.
                  > The main places where Hong Kong people like to ring in
                  > the new year are Lan Kwai Fong, an entertainment and
                  > dining area which is popular with expats; Times
                  > Square, a major shopping mall; and Tsimshatsui, along
                  > the waterfront.
                  >
                  > But I don't agree that New Year's has become more
                  > important than Chinese New Year. People do the
                  > countdown because it is a number and they know the
                  > next number will be "1." In short, it is fun. Most
                  > Chinese who follow the Chinese calendar treat Jan. 1
                  > as the 21st day of the eleventh month, meaning the
                  > next Chinee New Year will begin on Feb. 9. I'm not
                  > sure what determines when the new Chinese New Year
                  > begins. Perhaps Jane can shed some light on that.
                  > Also, what animal is next Chinese New Year?
                  >
                  > Hyde.
                  >
                  > Alexcranieri wrote:
                  >
                  > Ah, just receive email from friend in Australia. It is
                  > New Year now.
                  >
                  > I have question. My Hong Kong friend told me that 20
                  > years ago, the Hong Kong people did not take New Year
                  > very seriously. Few Chinese participate in countdown.
                  > He said Chinese New Year was big thing and New Year
                  > was just another day. Only Westerners would celebrate
                  > New Year in big way.
                  >
                  > But my friend said all this has changed. Maybe because
                  > of influence from Western culture. Now many Chinese
                  > celebrate and count down to New Year. It becoming even
                  > more important than Chinese New Year.
                  >
                  > Alex.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChineseCultureOnline/
                  >
                  > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > ChineseCultureOnline-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  Service.
                • liang_jieming
                  Hehehehe, that means this year you are either 11 years old, 23 years old, 35 years old, 47 years old, 59 years old, 71 years old, 83 years old, 95 years old or
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jan 6, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hehehehe, that means this year you are either 11 years old, 23 years
                    old, 35 years old, 47 years old, 59 years old, 71 years old, 83 years
                    old, 95 years old or almost impossibly 107 years old!

                    Jieming
                    DragonSeedLegacy
                    ChineseCultureOnline

                    --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "John Gerlach"
                    <firedog_hk@h...> wrote:
                    > Yes - and the year after that is my year - the Year of the Dog!
                    >
                    > ----Original Message Follows----
                    > From: "liang_jieming" <kitmengleong@y...>
                    > Reply-To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
                    > To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] Re: Happy New Year!
                    > Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2005 02:35:49 -0000
                    >
                    >
                    > Thanks for the explanation of the basis for the lunar based date for
                    > the Chinese New Year John.
                    >
                    > Just to add to this and answer the question raised, next year is the
                    > year of the Rooster.
                    >
                    > Jieming
                    > DragonSeedLegacy
                    > ChineseCultureOnline
                    >
                    > --- In ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com, "John Gerlach"
                    > <firedog_hk@h...> wrote:
                    > > Ha - even a poor Gwai Loh knows that Chinese New Year is also called
                    > the Lunar New Year (Lunar is an adjective from the Latin word for
                    > moon) because it is determined by the cycles of the moon which differ
                    > from year to year on the Solar Calendar (Solar is the adjective from
                    > the Latin word for Sun).
                    > >
                    > > In early times it was easier to calculate time periods by the moon
                    > because its four distinct phases were clearly visible - depending on
                    > cloud cover :), so the Lunar Calendar was first developed. Only later
                    > in history did civilisations develop the Solar Calendar because
                    > Astronomers were able to fix the time it took for the Earth to
                    > complete each cycle around the Sun, so that the four Solar seasons of
                    > Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter could each be allocated three
                    > calendar months of the Year.
                    > >
                    > > That is why we also have a Leap Year in the Solar Calendar because
                    > it was discovered that the early calculation of 364 days was not quite
                    > accurate - more closely 364.25, so they added a day to February every
                    > four years to bring the Solar Calendar back into line.
                    > >
                    > > The Western celebration of Easter was also dependent on the Lunar
                    > Calendar originally. Even after the Christian Religion took it over as
                    > a celebration of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, they
                    > retained its Lunar characteristic so that Easter is still celebrated
                    > on a different day each year in the Solar Calendar. The Christians
                    > call Easter a 'Moveable Feast' as opposed to a Fixed Feast such as
                    > Christmas (the supposed birthday of Christ) which is celebrated each
                    > year on the 25th of December.
                    > >
                    > > The Chinese (in common with other Lunar Year cultures) have
                    > accommodated themselves to the Solar Calendar because of its dominance
                    > in business, trade and global communications, but the Lunar New Year
                    > easily remains the most important event of their year wherever they
                    > happen to be in the World. This is true in Hong Kong, Beijing, Sydney
                    > or even New York.
                    > >
                    > > Well, at least we have two opportunities to wish everyone 'San Nin
                    > Fai Lok' or Happy New Year!
                    > >
                    > > John
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > From: Hyde Park
                    > > To: ChineseCultureOnline@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Sent: Sunday, 2 January 2005 1:52 AM
                    > > Subject: [ChineseCultureOnline] re: Happy New Year!
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Yes, Happy New Year to everyone.
                    > >
                    > > Alex, your Hong Kong friend is partly right. Thirty
                    > > years ago, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day wasn't a
                    > > big deal in Hong Kong. It was still a holiday, but the
                    > > difference is that not many people gathered at public
                    > > places to do the countdown. The major event then was
                    > > the firing of a cannon along Hong Kong's waterfront,
                    > > which was done by someone rich or famous. It is still
                    > > done every year at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31, but
                    > > it is not the only place to usher in the new year. I
                    > > would say it is probably the 5th or 6th popular now.
                    > > The main places where Hong Kong people like to ring in
                    > > the new year are Lan Kwai Fong, an entertainment and
                    > > dining area which is popular with expats; Times
                    > > Square, a major shopping mall; and Tsimshatsui, along
                    > > the waterfront.
                    > >
                    > > But I don't agree that New Year's has become more
                    > > important than Chinese New Year. People do the
                    > > countdown because it is a number and they know the
                    > > next number will be "1." In short, it is fun. Most
                    > > Chinese who follow the Chinese calendar treat Jan. 1
                    > > as the 21st day of the eleventh month, meaning the
                    > > next Chinee New Year will begin on Feb. 9. I'm not
                    > > sure what determines when the new Chinese New Year
                    > > begins. Perhaps Jane can shed some light on that.
                    > > Also, what animal is next Chinese New Year?
                    > >
                    > > Hyde.
                    > >
                    > > Alexcranieri wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Ah, just receive email from friend in Australia. It is
                    > > New Year now.
                    > >
                    > > I have question. My Hong Kong friend told me that 20
                    > > years ago, the Hong Kong people did not take New Year
                    > > very seriously. Few Chinese participate in countdown.
                    > > He said Chinese New Year was big thing and New Year
                    > > was just another day. Only Westerners would celebrate
                    > > New Year in big way.
                    > >
                    > > But my friend said all this has changed. Maybe because
                    > > of influence from Western culture. Now many Chinese
                    > > celebrate and count down to New Year. It becoming even
                    > > more important than Chinese New Year.
                    > >
                    > > Alex.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChineseCultureOnline/
                    > >
                    > > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > > ChineseCultureOnline-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > >
                    > > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                    > Service.
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.