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Possible replacement for film cans

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  • Dave Read
    I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 21, 2012

      I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers…they sound like a decent alternative.

       

      I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called “Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.” It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml…they’re all ¾” to 1” in diameter, and range in height from 1” to 3” or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

       

      I’m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

       

      Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It’s not “free” like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they’re readily available.

       

      D

       

    • gumbietygress@juno.com
      Dave,There is a product called gaff tape -- it s like duct tape, only cloth.It takes paint VERY well.True, this makes plastic adaptation a two step operation
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 21, 2012
        Dave,
        There is a product called 'gaff tape' -- it's like duct tape, only cloth.
        It takes paint VERY well.
        True, this makes plastic adaptation a two step operation (camo duct tape may be your best bet) -- but very few plastics take paint well, I've discovered. So, if you want to pick your colors, that might be an option.
         
        -BarbJ/painter/Tygress

        ---------- Original Message ----------
        From: "Dave Read" <dave@...>
        To: <CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Possible replacement for film cans
        Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 13:49:41 -0600

        I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers…they sound like a decent alternative.

         

        I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called “Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.” It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml…they’re all �” to 1” in diameter, and range in height from 1” to 3” or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

         

        I’m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

         

        Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It’s not “free” like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they’re readily available.

         

        D

         

         



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      • Bill Ellis
        I am currently beta testing a custom made container. It takes a little work to make them but the cost is nothing but some glue and maybe some paint. I can not
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 22, 2012
          I am currently beta testing a custom made container.  It takes a little work to make them but the cost is nothing but some glue and maybe some paint. 

          I can not claim credit for the idea because I have seen a few of these in the wild and depends on how well they are put together as to how water proof they may be, but they show promise.

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GTEu2qM8x4&feature=share  The Podcacher folks put this video together to show how to make your own.

          Since I drink quite a few bottles similar to the Gatorade ones shown I figured I would give this a shot other wise I would just throw them out to the recycle bin.

          On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Dave Read <dave@...> wrote:
           

          I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers…they sound like a decent alternative.

           

          I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called “Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.” It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml…they’re all ¾” to 1” in diameter, and range in height from 1” to 3” or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

           

          I’m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

           

          Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It’s not “free” like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they’re readily available.

           

          D

           




          --
          ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
          Bill
          a.k.a ZionZR2
          512-789-1469
          <>< <>< <>< <>< <><
        • Dave Read
          I deployed one of the Nalgene containers today. They have held their paint extremely well so far in my limited testing, so I decided to give it a shot. When
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 22, 2012
            I deployed one of the Nalgene containers today.  They have held their paint extremely well so far in my limited testing, so I decided to give it a shot. 

            When you get to Highway 71 #17, let me know what you think.

            D

            On Feb 22, 2012, at 5:36 PM, Bill Ellis <zionzr2@...> wrote:

             

            I am currently beta testing a custom made container.  It takes a little work to make them but the cost is nothing but some glue and maybe some paint. 

            I can not claim credit for the idea because I have seen a few of these in the wild and depends on how well they are put together as to how water proof they may be, but they show promise.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GTEu2qM8x4&feature=share  The Podcacher folks put this video together to show how to make your own.

            Since I drink quite a few bottles similar to the Gatorade ones shown I figured I would give this a shot other wise I would just throw them out to the recycle bin.

            On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Dave Read <dave@...> wrote:
             

            I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers…they sound like a decent alternative.

             

            I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called “Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.” It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml…they’re all ¾” to 1” in diameter, and range in height from 1” to 3” or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

             

            I’m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

             

            Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It’s not “free” like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they’re readily available.

             

            D

             




            --
            ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
            Bill
            a.k.a ZionZR2
            512-789-1469
            <>< <>< <>< <>< <><

          • gumbietygress@juno.com
            Bartman and Bigguy in Tx do those.... only their seem to be popping bits into each other, not just gluing the edges as in the video.Might be a little more
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 22, 2012
              Bartman and Bigguy in Tx do those.... only their seem to be popping bits into each other, not just gluing the edges as in the video.
              Might be a little more robust their way????
               
              BarbJ - making caches out of miscellanea is GOOD - Tygress

              ---------- Original Message ----------
              From: Bill Ellis <zionzr2@...>
              To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Possible replacement for film cans
              Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2012 17:36:36 -0600

              I am currently beta testing a custom made container.� It takes a little work to make them but the cost is nothing but some glue and maybe some paint.�

              I can not claim credit for the idea because I have seen a few of these in the wild and depends on how well they are put together as to how water proof they may be, but they show promise.

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GTEu2qM8x4&feature=share� The Podcacher folks put this video together to show how to make your own.

              Since I drink quite a few bottles similar to the Gatorade ones shown I figured I would give this a shot other wise I would just throw them out to the recycle bin.

              On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Dave Read <dave@...> wrote:

               

              I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don�t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers�they sound like a decent alternative.

              I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called �Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.� It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml�they�re all �� to 1� in diameter, and range in height from 1� to 3� or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

              I�m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

              Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It�s not �free� like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they�re readily available.

              D

               

               




              --
              ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
              Bill
              a.k.a ZionZR2
              512-789-1469
              <>< <>< <>< <>< <><

               



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            • Dave Read
              Bill-- I finally had some time to watch the video. Very cool. I would probably use E6000 craft glue, which dries sort of rubbery and strong. I love that stuff.
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 23, 2012
                Bill--

                I finally had some time to watch the video. Very cool. I would probably use E6000 craft glue, which dries sort of rubbery and strong. I love that stuff. 

                I have only seen one cache even similar to this in the wild. It was by Reagan airport in DC, and the guy had used the top ~2 inches of the bottle plus some sort of plastic sheet across the bottom.  He glued a bunch of small pebbles and street trash to it, and left the thing near the curb on a less busy street. Urban geotrash, I suppose. The weird part is that it had been there or to years when I found it. I guess they don't run street sweepers through there very often. ;)

                Thanks for the link!

                D

                On Feb 22, 2012, at 5:36 PM, Bill Ellis <zionzr2@...> wrote:

                 

                I am currently beta testing a custom made container.  It takes a little work to make them but the cost is nothing but some glue and maybe some paint. 

                I can not claim credit for the idea because I have seen a few of these in the wild and depends on how well they are put together as to how water proof they may be, but they show promise.

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GTEu2qM8x4&feature=share  The Podcacher folks put this video together to show how to make your own.

                Since I drink quite a few bottles similar to the Gatorade ones shown I figured I would give this a shot other wise I would just throw them out to the recycle bin.

                On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Dave Read <dave@...> wrote:
                 

                I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers…they sound like a decent alternative.

                 

                I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called “Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.” It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml…they’re all ¾” to 1” in diameter, and range in height from 1” to 3” or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

                 

                I’m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

                 

                Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It’s not “free” like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they’re readily available.

                 

                D

                 




                --
                ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                Bill
                a.k.a ZionZR2
                512-789-1469
                <>< <>< <>< <>< <><

              • Indigo Parrish
                ... I ve encountered many of those hidden by JMCz along the bike paths of San Antonio that run between the missions. They do seem to be durable and
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 24, 2012
                  --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, Dave Read <dave@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Bill--
                  >
                  > I finally had some time to watch the video. Very cool. I would probably use E6000 craft glue, which dries sort of rubbery and strong. I love that stuff.
                  >
                  > I have only seen one cache even similar to this in the wild. It was by Reagan airport in DC, and the guy had used the top ~2 inches of the bottle plus some sort of plastic sheet across the bottom. He glued a bunch of small pebbles and street trash to it, and left the thing near the curb on a less busy street. Urban geotrash, I suppose. The weird part is that it had been there or to years when I found it. I guess they don't run street sweepers through there very often. ;)

                  I've encountered many of those hidden by JMCz along the bike paths of San Antonio that run between the missions. They do seem to be durable and waterproof.

                  -Keith (Indigo Parrish)
                • Jay Bingham
                  I have used Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive effectively to glue plastic bottle tops to PVC pipe. I have not tried to glue two of them together with
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 24, 2012

                    I have used Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive effectively to glue plastic bottle tops to PVC pipe. I have not tried to glue two of them together with it yet, but I suspect it will work. It is available in a 1 fl. oz. tube and costs under $3 at the big box hardware stores. If you are doing a bunch of gluing a big tube of E6000 is good, my problem with a big tube is that it usually hardens beyond the ability to use it before I can use all of it up. I know there are people who swear by Gorilla glue but it did not work well when I first tried it many years ago to glue the rungs of chairs back in place. But that is probably more abuse that holding two bottle tops together would ever subject the glue to.

                     

                    --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                    |+| Georgetown , TX USA
                    |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                     


                    From: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com [mailto: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Dave Read
                    Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2012 6:34 AM
                    To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Possible replacement for film cans

                     

                     

                    Bill--

                     

                    I finally had some time to watch the video. Very cool. I would probably use E6000 craft glue, which dries sort of rubbery and strong. I love that stuff. 

                     

                    I have only seen one cache even similar to this in the wild. It was by Reagan airport in DC, and the guy had used the top ~2 inches of the bottle plus some sort of plastic sheet across the bottom.  He glued a bunch of small pebbles and street trash to it, and left the thing near the curb on a less busy street. Urban geotrash, I suppose. The weird part is that it had been there or to years when I found it. I guess they don't run street sweepers through there very often. ;)

                     

                    Thanks for the link!

                     

                    D

                    On Feb 22, 2012, at 5:36 PM, Bill Ellis <zionzr2@...> wrote:

                     

                    I am currently beta testing a custom made container.  It takes a little work to make them but the cost is nothing but some glue and maybe some paint. 

                    I can not claim credit for the idea because I have seen a few of these in the wild and depends on how well they are put together as to how water proof they may be, but they show promise.

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GTEu2qM8x4&feature=share  The Podcacher folks put this video together to show how to make your own.

                    Since I drink quite a few bottles similar to the Gatorade ones shown I figured I would give this a shot other wise I would just throw them out to the recycle bin.

                    On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Dave Read <dave@...> wrote:

                     

                    I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers…they sound like a decent alternative.

                     

                    I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called “Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.” It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml…they’re all ¾” to 1” in diameter, and range in height from 1” to 3” or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

                     

                    I’m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

                     

                    Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It’s not “free” like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they’re readily available.

                     

                    D

                     




                    --
                    ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                    Bill
                    a.k.a ZionZR2
                    512-789-1469
                    <>< <>< <>< <>< <><

                  • Bill Ellis
                    The glue I am currently working with is a product called Liquid Fusion Clear Urethane Glue. It is Non-foaming and waterproof it seems to be a bit flexible
                    Message 9 of 13 , Feb 24, 2012
                      The glue I am currently working with is a product called  Liquid Fusion Clear Urethane Glue.  It is Non-foaming and waterproof it seems to be a bit flexible which should be good. 

                      I used something similar to the Gorilla glue that foamed a bit and I did not like it. Plus the bottle dried up after one or two uses.
                       
                      Thanks for the suggestions for other adhesives. I guess only time and the elements will be the sure test of this container format.


                      On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 8:17 PM, Jay Bingham <binghamjc@...> wrote:
                       

                      I have used Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive effectively to glue plastic bottle tops to PVC pipe. I have not tried to glue two of them together with it yet, but I suspect it will work. It is available in a 1 fl. oz. tube and costs under $3 at the big box hardware stores. If you are doing a bunch of gluing a big tube of E6000 is good, my problem with a big tube is that it usually hardens beyond the ability to use it before I can use all of it up. I know there are people who swear by Gorilla glue but it did not work well when I first tried it many years ago to glue the rungs of chairs back in place. But that is probably more abuse that holding two bottle tops together would ever subject the glue to.

                       

                      --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                      |+| Georgetown, TX USA
                      |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”


                      ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                      Bill
                      a.k.a ZionZR2
                      512-789-1469
                      <>< <>< <>< <>< <><
                    • Dave Read
                      Gorilla Glue is good stuff, but my experiences are that it works best on porous materials, and it helps if you can clamp or screw the glue joint tight...as the
                      Message 10 of 13 , Feb 24, 2012
                        Gorilla Glue is good stuff, but my experiences are that it works best on porous materials, and it helps if you can clamp or screw the glue joint tight...as the glue foams & expands, it will force itself into the material. Thus, doesn't surprise me to me to hear you say it didn't work well on the bottle tops. 

                        I like Bill's suggestion of the urethane glue. I'll have to try that.

                        You can get smaller tubes of E-6000, and if you keep it capped between uses it has a decent shelf life. I was repairing a cache this week and dug out an open tube from ~18 months ago...it was still nice n' runny. 

                        I'm looking forward to trying some variations on the bottle cap idea. I have a few ideas...

                        D

                        On Feb 24, 2012, at 8:17 PM, Jay Bingham <binghamjc@...> wrote:

                         

                        I have used Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive effectively to glue plastic bottle tops to PVC pipe. I have not tried to glue two of them together with it yet, but I suspect it will work. It is available in a 1 fl. oz. tube and costs under $3 at the big box hardware stores. If you are doing a bunch of gluing a big tube of E6000 is good, my problem with a big tube is that it usually hardens beyond the ability to use it before I can use all of it up. I know there are people who swear by Gorilla glue but it did not work well when I first tried it many years ago to glue the rungs of chairs back in place. But that is probably more abuse that holding two bottle tops together would ever subject the glue to.

                         

                        --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                        |+| Georgetown , TX USA
                        |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                         


                        From: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Dave Read
                        Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2012 6:34 AM
                        To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Possible replacement for film cans

                         

                         

                        Bill--

                         

                        I finally had some time to watch the video. Very cool. I would probably use E6000 craft glue, which dries sort of rubbery and strong. I love that stuff. 

                         

                        I have only seen one cache even similar to this in the wild. It was by Reagan airport in DC, and the guy had used the top ~2 inches of the bottle plus some sort of plastic sheet across the bottom.  He glued a bunch of small pebbles and street trash to it, and left the thing near the curb on a less busy street. Urban geotrash, I suppose. The weird part is that it had been there or to years when I found it. I guess they don't run street sweepers through there very often. ;)

                         

                        Thanks for the link!

                         

                        D

                        On Feb 22, 2012, at 5:36 PM, Bill Ellis <zionzr2@...> wrote:

                         

                        I am currently beta testing a custom made container.  It takes a little work to make them but the cost is nothing but some glue and maybe some paint. 

                        I can not claim credit for the idea because I have seen a few of these in the wild and depends on how well they are put together as to how water proof they may be, but they show promise.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GTEu2qM8x4&feature=share  The Podcacher folks put this video together to show how to make your own.

                        Since I drink quite a few bottles similar to the Gatorade ones shown I figured I would give this a shot other wise I would just throw them out to the recycle bin.

                        On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Dave Read <dave@...> wrote:

                         

                        I read the previous thread on this topic with some interest, especially given the number of film cans I needed recently. Unfortunately for me I don’t know anyone with diabetes to supply the test strip containers…they sound like a decent alternative.

                         

                        I have another suggestion, though. I was at REI a few weeks ago, buying supplies for a campout my son was set to attend. They sold a product called “Nalgene Multi-Purpose Vial Kit.” It has 10 nalgene plastic vials of various sizes ranging from 30 ml to 120 ml…they’re all ¾” to 1” in diameter, and range in height from 1” to 3” or so. The lids snap on tight and seem waterproof; at least they seem better than film cans.

                         

                        I’m testing how well they take paint (film cans *suck* at this), and so far the results have been promising. I will report again after I try a few more paints from my closet.

                         

                        Anyway, REI sold the kit for $9, and Amazon has them for $7. It’s not “free” like film cans, but so far they seem superior to film cans and they’re readily available.

                         

                        D

                         




                        --
                        ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                        Bill
                        a.k.a ZionZR2
                        512-789-1469
                        <>< <>< <>< <>< <><

                      • Jay Bingham
                        I made some cache containers last night using the Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive. It works great, now to see how it holds up in the environment.
                        Message 11 of 13 , Feb 25, 2012

                          I made some cache containers last night using the Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive. It works great, now to see how it holds up in the environment.

                           

                          --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                          |+| Georgetown , TX USA
                          |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                           


                          From: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com [mailto: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Bill Ellis
                          Sent: Friday, February 24, 2012 8:30 PM
                          To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Possible replacement for film cans

                           

                           

                          The glue I am currently working with is a product called  Liquid Fusion Clear Urethane Glue.  It is Non-foaming and waterproof it seems to be a bit flexible which should be good. 

                          I used something similar to the Gorilla glue that foamed a bit and I did not like it. Plus the bottle dried up after one or two uses.
                           
                          Thanks for the suggestions for other adhesives. I guess only time and the elements will be the sure test of this container format.

                          On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 8:17 PM, Jay Bingham <binghamjc@...> wrote:

                           

                          I have used Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive effectively to glue plastic bottle tops to PVC pipe. I have not tried to glue two of them together with it yet, but I suspect it will work. It is available in a 1 fl. oz. tube and costs under $3 at the big box hardware stores. If you are doing a bunch of gluing a big tube of E6000 is good, my problem with a big tube is that it usually hardens beyond the ability to use it before I can use all of it up. I know there are people who swear by Gorilla glue but it did not work well when I first tried it many years ago to glue the rungs of chairs back in place. But that is probably more abuse that holding two bottle tops together would ever subject the glue to.

                           

                          --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                          |+| Georgetown , TX USA
                          |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                           

                          ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                          Bill
                          a.k.a ZionZR2
                          512-789-1469
                          <>< <>< <>< <>< <><

                        • Bill Ellis
                          I have made a handful of these containers and performed a couple of tests. Test one was somewhat accidental but still proved to be an effective test. I had a
                          Message 12 of 13 , Mar 2, 2012
                            I have made a handful of these containers and performed a couple of tests.

                            Test one was somewhat accidental but still proved to be an effective test.  I had a Drop test from over 15 feet with empty contents. The container hit a bed of smooth stones and stayed completely intact.

                            Test 2 was a water submerge test.  I placed a several coins wraped in toilet paper inside the cache then submerged half way under water and left for well over an hour possibly 2 hours.  The tissue inside remained completely dry. There was ZERO water penetration.

                            These tests proved to me they were ready for deployment for real world testing. One has already been deployed and awaiting publishing.

                            I hope you Enjoy as you see these appear out in the wild.

                            On Sat, Feb 25, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Jay Bingham <binghamjc@...> wrote:
                             

                            I made some cache containers last night using the Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive. It works great, now to see how it holds up in the environment.

                             

                            --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                            |+| Georgetown, TX USA
                            |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                             


                            From: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Ellis
                            Sent: Friday, February 24, 2012 8:30 PM


                            To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Possible replacement for film cans

                             

                             

                            The glue I am currently working with is a product called  Liquid Fusion Clear Urethane Glue.  It is Non-foaming and waterproof it seems to be a bit flexible which should be good. 


                            I used something similar to the Gorilla glue that foamed a bit and I did not like it. Plus the bottle dried up after one or two uses.
                             
                            Thanks for the suggestions for other adhesives. I guess only time and the elements will be the sure test of this container format.

                            On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 8:17 PM, Jay Bingham <binghamjc@...> wrote:

                             

                            I have used Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive effectively to glue plastic bottle tops to PVC pipe. I have not tried to glue two of them together with it yet, but I suspect it will work. It is available in a 1 fl. oz. tube and costs under $3 at the big box hardware stores. If you are doing a bunch of gluing a big tube of E6000 is good, my problem with a big tube is that it usually hardens beyond the ability to use it before I can use all of it up. I know there are people who swear by Gorilla glue but it did not work well when I first tried it many years ago to glue the rungs of chairs back in place. But that is probably more abuse that holding two bottle tops together would ever subject the glue to.

                             

                            --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                            |+| Georgetown, TX USA
                            |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                             

                            ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                            Bill
                            a.k.a ZionZR2
                            512-789-1469
                            <>< <>< <>< <>< <><




                            --
                            ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                            Bill
                            a.k.a ZionZR2
                            512-789-1469
                            <>< <>< <>< <>< <><
                          • Greg Jewett
                            I am going through a lot of back logged email. Does anyone want to help write an article, maybe even with pictures I will publish to the website. It would be
                            Message 13 of 13 , Sep 28, 2012
                              I am going through a lot of back logged email.

                              Does anyone want to help write an article, maybe even with pictures I will publish to the website.  It would be awesome! :)


                              Greg Jewett
                              Geocacher Handle:  GeoJewett
                              (512) 627-7290
                              geojewett (at) geocachingaustin.com
                              http://geocaching.ejewett.com/
                              Don't print this e-mail unless it's necessary. Save a tree





                              On Mar 2, 2012, at 06:39 , Bill Ellis wrote:

                               

                              I have made a handful of these containers and performed a couple of tests.

                              Test one was somewhat accidental but still proved to be an effective test.  I had a Drop test from over 15 feet with empty contents. The container hit a bed of smooth stones and stayed completely intact.

                              Test 2 was a water submerge test.  I placed a several coins wraped in toilet paper inside the cache then submerged half way under water and left for well over an hour possibly 2 hours.  The tissue inside remained completely dry. There was ZERO water penetration.

                              These tests proved to me they were ready for deployment for real world testing. One has already been deployed and awaiting publishing.

                              I hope you Enjoy as you see these appear out in the wild.

                              On Sat, Feb 25, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Jay Bingham <binghamjc@...> wrote:
                               

                              I made some cache containers last night using the Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive. It works great, now to see how it holds up in the environment.

                               

                              --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                              |+| Georgetown, TX USA
                              |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                               


                              From: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Ellis
                              Sent: Friday, February 24, 2012 8:30 PM


                              To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Possible replacement for film cans

                               

                               

                              The glue I am currently working with is a product called  Liquid Fusion Clear Urethane Glue.  It is Non-foaming and waterproof it seems to be a bit flexible which should be good. 


                              I used something similar to the Gorilla glue that foamed a bit and I did not like it. Plus the bottle dried up after one or two uses.
                               
                              Thanks for the suggestions for other adhesives. I guess only time and the elements will be the sure test of this container format.


                              On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 8:17 PM, Jay Bingham <binghamjc@...> wrote:

                               

                              I have used Loctite Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive effectively to glue plastic bottle tops to PVC pipe. I have not tried to glue two of them together with it yet, but I suspect it will work. It is available in a 1 fl. oz. tube and costs under $3 at the big box hardware stores. If you are doing a bunch of gluing a big tube of E6000 is good, my problem with a big tube is that it usually hardens beyond the ability to use it before I can use all of it up. I know there are people who swear by Gorilla glue but it did not work well when I first tried it many years ago to glue the rungs of chairs back in place. But that is probably more abuse that holding two bottle tops together would ever subject the glue to.

                               

                              --| Jay / Bing-GTX
                              |+| Georgetown, TX USA
                              |-- “What you see depends mainly on what you are looking for.”

                               

                              ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                              Bill
                              a.k.a ZionZR2
                              512-789-1469
                              <>< <>< <>< <>< <><





                              --
                              ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>
                              Bill
                              a.k.a ZionZR2
                              512-789-1469
                              <>< <>< <>< <>< <><


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