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Re: How accurate can you really get?

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  • djdirkdiggla
    As was said, the commercial ones are dead on, but they cost like $5k. And as you mentioned, if the person placing has an inaccurate device then it will be
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 30, 2010
      As was said, the commercial ones are dead on, but they cost like $5k. And as you mentioned, if the person placing has an inaccurate device then it will be inaccurate. My little Garmin is usually 7-10 feet accurate. Good enough for me since I bought it for $50 on craigslist.

      There is another format if location spotting... completely slipping my mind right now... but it's supposed to be far superior to GPS. But I guess it's kinda like Betamax vs VHS or Bluray vs HD... the inferior format has already won.

      --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, "electric_water_boy" <electric_water_boy@...> wrote:
      >
      > How accurate can you really get? When I hear people talk about how accurate their GPSr or cell phone is, I just think to myself "Here we go again." I believe some geocachers think they're going to get eventually get a device that will locate a position down to pin head. Can that happen? Does it matter?
      >
      > If you had the latest, greatest device, and let's say it could get you down to a pin head, it really wouldn't matter unless the person who hid the geocache used the same device and in the same conditions. If the cache was hidden in the early 2000's, accuracy at best was + or - 20 feet. Position of the satellites and weather effect where the GPSr computes its location.
      >
      > But what if you had the ideal situation? How close could you get? Can you get to a pin head? I used FizzyCalc to figure this out for myself. I started with N 29 25.000 W 098 30.000, a location in downtown San Antonio. I checked the distance from that point to N 29 25.001 W 098 30.000. Then I checked the distance from the original point to N 29 25.000 W 098 30.001. And finally I checked the distance from the original point to N 29 25.001 W 098 30.001. What I came up with was a rectangle that is just over 6 feet by 5 feet, and 8 feet from corner to corner. That's a pretty good sized search area.
      >
      > There are two things to conclude from this. First, in San Antonio, with accurate coordinates out to 3 decimal places as www.geocaching.com uses, you will have 30 square feet of area to search for a cache. Second, having accurate coordinates makes a big difference. Being off by 0.001 North or West may not cause too many headaches. But if you're off by 0.002 or 0.003 you could be off by 16 to 24 feet. That third decimal point makes a difference.
      >
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