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Re: ideas and tips for caching in the heat

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  • semperquestio
    OK. I m no doctor or anything, so all this is from my Marine Corps training and personal experiences. Some of this may be outdated thinking, but here goes
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 23, 2010
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      OK. I'm no doctor or anything, so all this is from my Marine Corps training and personal experiences. Some of this may be outdated thinking, but here goes anyway...

      Plenty of hydration well before going out in the heat is key. Just drinking water when you go out or while you are out is not enough. You must "pre-hydrate" as well, especially if you are not used to hot outdoor activity. Increase your overall water intake and decrease any caffeine or alcohol intake. Both caffeine and alcohol will dehydrate you quickly. Drinking a nice cold Coke during a hot day may feel refreshing at the time, but it can actually cause you serious harm through dehydration.

      Next rule...know your limits and don't push beyond them! Granted, the best way to get used to the heat is to go out in it, that does not mean go out there and hike 10 miles. Start slow and go easy. Gradually increase your activity levels as your body gets used to operating in hot and humid conditions.

      Next? Learn your body's language. Everyone reacts to heat and dehydration a little differently, but there are a few common warning signs. Go out and do some Googling (or hit WebMD) on heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Learn the symptoms and treatments BEFORE you go out there. Some BIG warnings that you need to stop immediately....
      - feeling light-headed
      - a sudden-onset general "tired" feeling
      - you stop sweating or you start sweating more than usual
      - your skin turns pale or gets very flush

      I am still pretty old-school about salt intake also. Learned this in the Corps and it's always worked, but you have to take your own health status into account. During the hot months, I generally add just a little (not much) salt into darn near everything I eat. Of course, if something is already salty or it would just taste bad, then I don't, but a little extra here and there to help the body's temperature regulating systems do their thing.

      Finally, if you have EVER had any kind of a heat-related health condition, you must be especially careful. Once you've been hit by a heat condition, you may be extra sensitive and susceptible to them later.

      And the single biggest tip of all.....

      When in doubt, sit it out.

      Good luck!



      --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Pratt" <kpflounder@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Wow - it's hot here in Houston! We haven't cached for a few weeks, due to
      > the heat! I have to use my phone to cache with, and the evening use of
      > phones and gps causes drastic satellite delay. So, I can only do am
      > caching.
      >
      > We carry water bottles AND a large thermos filled with cold water.
      >
      > Just wondering if the heat is harmful to devices?
      >
      > We also watch for snakes, who are out this time of year.
      >
      > Any other tips or reminders we all need to hear? Oh yes, sunscreen!!
      >
      >
      >
      > Kathy Pratt
      >
      > Christ follower, wife, mother, teacher
      >
      > Facebook/geocache/aim kpflounder
      >
    • Kathy Pratt
      Good tips - thanks! I always pre-apply sunscreen. For strenuous days, we sort of carbo load. Never thought to water load, too! Kathy Pratt Christ follower,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 24, 2010
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        Good tips – thanks!  I always pre-apply sunscreen.  For strenuous days, we sort of carbo load.  Never thought to water load, too!  

         

        Kathy Pratt

        Christ follower, wife, mother, teacher

        Facebook/geocache/aim  kpflounder

         

      • tha_snazzle@att.net
        As an assistant scoutmaster with the BSA, one thing I ve picked up to tell the scouts during summer camp (when the troop is outdoors in the heat for a week at
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 24, 2010
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          As an assistant scoutmaster with the BSA, one thing I've picked up to tell the scouts during summer camp (when the troop is outdoors in the heat for a week at a time and dehydration and heat exhaustion are always looming) is to monitor the color of their urine. Sounds weird, but it's a pretty good indicator of dehydration - you want it to be as close to clear as possible, which indicates that your fluid intake is at an acceptable level during the heat. Too much color in your urine indicates that you're losing more nutrients than fluid, which is bad for lots of reasons.

          Semperquestio is definitely right on about learning the symptoms for heat exhaustion/heat stroke/dehydration. Being on constant lookout for these symptoms is necessary if you're going to be out in the heat for an extended period of time, particularly with youth. Everyone reacts differently - for me, I know I'm in trouble when I stop sweating.

          Finally, know what to do when you see these symptoms. Sit out in the shade, cool down, and drink water, drink water, drink water. A cool cloth on the forehead can do wonders. If you like having a handheld fan on you during the hot months, I'd advise saving the batteries for these occasions.

          Oh, and, of course, one thing that I've noticed is that I've started to change the timing of my caching during the summer. Early in the morning and late in the afternoon, obviously, are best. Might be a good time to pick up night caches as well - if memory serves, there are a few in the Houston area.

          --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, "semperquestio" <sq@...> wrote:
          >
          > OK. I'm no doctor or anything, so all this is from my Marine Corps training and personal experiences. Some of this may be outdated thinking, but here goes anyway...
          >
          > Plenty of hydration well before going out in the heat is key. Just drinking water when you go out or while you are out is not enough. You must "pre-hydrate" as well, especially if you are not used to hot outdoor activity. Increase your overall water intake and decrease any caffeine or alcohol intake. Both caffeine and alcohol will dehydrate you quickly. Drinking a nice cold Coke during a hot day may feel refreshing at the time, but it can actually cause you serious harm through dehydration.
          >
          > Next rule...know your limits and don't push beyond them! Granted, the best way to get used to the heat is to go out in it, that does not mean go out there and hike 10 miles. Start slow and go easy. Gradually increase your activity levels as your body gets used to operating in hot and humid conditions.
          >
          > Next? Learn your body's language. Everyone reacts to heat and dehydration a little differently, but there are a few common warning signs. Go out and do some Googling (or hit WebMD) on heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Learn the symptoms and treatments BEFORE you go out there. Some BIG warnings that you need to stop immediately....
          > - feeling light-headed
          > - a sudden-onset general "tired" feeling
          > - you stop sweating or you start sweating more than usual
          > - your skin turns pale or gets very flush
          >
          > I am still pretty old-school about salt intake also. Learned this in the Corps and it's always worked, but you have to take your own health status into account. During the hot months, I generally add just a little (not much) salt into darn near everything I eat. Of course, if something is already salty or it would just taste bad, then I don't, but a little extra here and there to help the body's temperature regulating systems do their thing.
          >
          > Finally, if you have EVER had any kind of a heat-related health condition, you must be especially careful. Once you've been hit by a heat condition, you may be extra sensitive and susceptible to them later.
          >
          > And the single biggest tip of all.....
          >
          > When in doubt, sit it out.
          >
          > Good luck!
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Pratt" <kpflounder@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Wow - it's hot here in Houston! We haven't cached for a few weeks, due to
          > > the heat! I have to use my phone to cache with, and the evening use of
          > > phones and gps causes drastic satellite delay. So, I can only do am
          > > caching.
          > >
          > > We carry water bottles AND a large thermos filled with cold water.
          > >
          > > Just wondering if the heat is harmful to devices?
          > >
          > > We also watch for snakes, who are out this time of year.
          > >
          > > Any other tips or reminders we all need to hear? Oh yes, sunscreen!!
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Kathy Pratt
          > >
          > > Christ follower, wife, mother, teacher
          > >
          > > Facebook/geocache/aim kpflounder
          > >
          >
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