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Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes

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  • Barb Jernigan
    On Mon, 02 Mar 2009 12:03:05 -0000 mrs.browning ... Well, I did see a meter long garter snake up on Enchanted Rock, but they don t worry me. I ve also seen
    Message 1 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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      On Mon, 02 Mar 2009 12:03:05 -0000 "mrs.browning"
      <mrs.browning@...> writes:
      > Hello!
      > After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
      > yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
      > redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided
      > it
      > was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.
      >
      > Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share with
      > the newbie?
      >
      > Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking boots?
      > I
      > would like the ankle supports, if possible.
      >
      > Thanks!
      >

      Well, I did see a meter long garter snake up on Enchanted Rock, but they
      don't worry me.
      I've also seen Texas Ratsnakes, and there was the cutest little pencil
      sized gartersnake once who was trying to convince me he was a 6 foot
      rattler -- SO ferocious. Yeah.
      My closer calls have been with fireants and scorpions.

      That said, if you do not have a tool to poke under things with, there's
      usually a stick around ... don't just stick your hand in there.
      Walking staffs are good.
      You'll want to invest in a small multitool as well -- sometimes it
      requires pliers or other aid to extract a fat log from a little cache
      container. [We find the fingernail cleaner tool excellent for those
      tasks).

      Boots.
      Love my Merrels.
      Both Waterweasel and I wear the Merrell Moab Ventilators -- as
      comfortable as a boot can get in Texas Summers (breathable)
      I get the mid-high, because I need the ankle support -- I see them listed
      on line for $90, and the HushPuppie store in the Outlet Mall had them for
      $80 (but not my size -- 9). REI and Cabelas carry them.
      From the moment those suckers went on my feet, oh, 3 or 4 years ago, I've
      been sure-footed and no 'break-in' period. Love 'em. Enchanted Rock
      nearly finished them off (they've been dying for months), I need to track
      down a new pair. Russ (Waterweasel) wears his as nearly his sole pair of
      shoes -- he has plantar fascia and these are the cure.

      Invest in good socks, too.

      Even the competitive hikers will tell you: TAKE CARE OF YOUR FEET!

      That also said ... Mrs Captain Picard is out there in Teva sandals. I
      fear one exchange with grass burrs cured me of THAT.

      So that's the Tygress' favorite boots.

      But do have a care -- we share the outdoors with all kinds of critters.
      Most don't care to mess with us (only fire ants seem to want to go out of
      their way), but heads up is always good advise. [And poke before you
      look!]
      ____________________________________________________________
      Digital Photography - Click Now.
      http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/BLSrjpTDvmTGDhrcs7qVs52ojRsc9lpkem9Bp49DyNZ6znOoWPtPsLg2eZK/
    • Barb Jernigan
      What he said about boots... try a bunch on. But a good pair ... and good socks ... are worth it. When your feet go south, your whole experience goes south. On
      Message 2 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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        What he said about boots... try a bunch on.
        But a good pair ... and good socks ... are worth it.
        When your feet go south, your whole experience goes south.

        On Mon, 2 Mar 2009 07:40:39 -0600 "Kevin (KoosKoos)"
        <centexgeocaching@...> writes:
        > I've had a few encounters with snakes on the trail, but usually it
        > was
        > just the "hey, look, a snake" variety. They're really not out to
        > mess
        > with us unless we stumble across them.
        >
        > However, while that's the general result, I did find a very
        > aggressive
        > coral snake while searching in the Barton Creek greenbelt. It
        > didn't
        > take kindly to me stepping closer to take a picture and turned on
        > me.
        > It gave chase for 5 or 6 steps until it decided I'd gotten the
        > message. I gave it a much wider berth as I went around its pile of
        > sticks to go for the cache.
        >
        > As far as hiking boots, you need to find something that fits your
        > foot. If you're just going to be doing casual hiking, the
        > varieties
        > at Academy will probably fit your need. Just try on brands/styles
        > and
        > WALK around a bit to make sure you have something comfortable.
        >
        > If you want to get a more serious boot, your best bet is to go to
        > REI
        > or Cabela's and work with someone that can fit you properly. You'll
        > pay more, but you'll have a pair of boots that should last years
        > and
        > years. My son and I both bought some recently (preparing for our
        > Boy
        > Scout 10 days of backpacking this summer) and the ones that fit his
        > foot the best were almost painful on mine. The bottom line is a
        > brand
        > or model line that someone loves may not be the right one for you.
        >
        > Kevin
        > KoosKooos
        >
        > On Mon, Mar 2, 2009 at 6:03 AM, mrs.browning
        > <mrs.browning@...> wrote:
        > > Hello!
        > > After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
        > > yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
        > > redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided
        > it
        > > was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.
        > >
        > > Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share
        > with
        > > the newbie?
        > >
        > > Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking
        > boots? I
        > > would like the ankle supports, if possible.
        > >
        > > Thanks!
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        @,.-:*'``'*:-.,@,.-:*'``'*:-.,@
        We understand and believe vastly more than we know. --Blaise Pascal
        ____________________________________________________________
        Click here to save cash and find low rates on auto loans.
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      • Tiffany
        I have to agree with the others.  If your really going to invest in hiking boots...there isn t a brand that just fits everyone.  Take the time and spend the
        Message 3 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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          I have to agree with the others.  If your really going to invest in hiking boots...there isn't a brand that just fits everyone.  Take the time and spend the money.  When I was backpacking at first, (oh...I so need to do that again!!)  I had just a run of the mill pair..after one more extensive hiking weekend..I thought I needed to amputate my poor feet.  I immediately went to REI the next week fully prepared to spend whatever it took to make sure I had a pair of quality hiking boots.  Once I got those...they have never failed me!!

          Tiffany
          (just starting to geocache..been doing research and reading...finally scored the gps and now plotting where to start!!)

          --- On Mon, 3/2/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...> wrote:
          From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...>
          Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes
          To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 6:03 AM

          Hello!
          After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
          yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
          redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided it
          was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.

          Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share with
          the newbie?

          Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking boots? I
          would like the ankle supports, if possible.

          Thanks!

        • Doc
          The hiking boots won t help a lot in protecting you from snake bites.  For that you need something to protect your calves.  In Texas summer, that will get
          Message 4 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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            The hiking boots won't help a lot in protecting you from snake bites.  For that you need something to protect your calves.  In Texas summer, that will get uncomfortable!
            Here are some snake proofing items:
             
            Barry
             
            He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid him.
            He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach him.
            He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
            He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.


            --- On Mon, 3/2/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...> wrote:

            From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...>
            Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes
            To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 6:03 AM

            Hello!
            After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
            yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
            redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided it
            was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.

            Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share with
            the newbie?

            Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking boots? I
            would like the ankle supports, if possible.

            Thanks!


          • Doc
            Inspect all holes before sticking your hand in there! I found a telephone-pole-sized fence post at GZ once. It had a hole about 6 high by about 4 across
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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              Inspect all holes before sticking your hand in there!
              I found a telephone-pole-sized fence post at GZ once.
              It had a hole about 6" high by about 4" across about eye-level.
              I was about to reach in and then shone the flashlight into the hole.
              Good thing.  There staring back at me was a opossom baring his teeth!
              Barry
               
              He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid him.
              He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach him.
              He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
              He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.


              --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Barb Jernigan <gumbietygress@...> wrote:

              From: Barb Jernigan <gumbietygress@...>
              Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes
              To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 7:56 AM


              On Mon, 02 Mar 2009 12:03:05 -0000 "mrs.browning"
              <mrs.browning@ yahoo.com> writes:
              > Hello!
              > After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
              > yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
              > redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided
              > it
              > was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.
              >
              > Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share with
              > the newbie?
              >
              > Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking boots?
              > I
              > would like the ankle supports, if possible.
              >
              > Thanks!
              >

              Well, I did see a meter long garter snake up on Enchanted Rock, but they
              don't worry me.
              I've also seen Texas Ratsnakes, and there was the cutest little pencil
              sized gartersnake once who was trying to convince me he was a 6 foot
              rattler -- SO ferocious. Yeah.
              My closer calls have been with fireants and scorpions.

              That said, if you do not have a tool to poke under things with, there's
              usually a stick around ... don't just stick your hand in there.
              Walking staffs are good.
              You'll want to invest in a small multitool as well -- sometimes it
              requires pliers or other aid to extract a fat log from a little cache
              container. [We find the fingernail cleaner tool excellent for those
              tasks).

              Boots.
              Love my Merrels.
              Both Waterweasel and I wear the Merrell Moab Ventilators -- as
              comfortable as a boot can get in Texas Summers (breathable)
              I get the mid-high, because I need the ankle support -- I see them listed
              on line for $90, and the HushPuppie store in the Outlet Mall had them for
              $80 (but not my size -- 9). REI and Cabelas carry them.
              From the moment those suckers went on my feet, oh, 3 or 4 years ago, I've
              been sure-footed and no 'break-in' period. Love 'em. Enchanted Rock
              nearly finished them off (they've been dying for months), I need to track
              down a new pair. Russ (Waterweasel) wears his as nearly his sole pair of
              shoes -- he has plantar fascia and these are the cure.

              Invest in good socks, too.

              Even the competitive hikers will tell you: TAKE CARE OF YOUR FEET!

              That also said ... Mrs Captain Picard is out there in Teva sandals. I
              fear one exchange with grass burrs cured me of THAT.

              So that's the Tygress' favorite boots.

              But do have a care -- we share the outdoors with all kinds of critters.
              Most don't care to mess with us (only fire ants seem to want to go out of
              their way), but heads up is always good advise. [And poke before you
              look!]
              ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
              Digital Photography - Click Now.
              http://thirdpartyof fers.juno. com/TGL2141/ fc/BLSrjpTDvmTGD hrcs7qVs52ojRsc9 lpkem9Bp49DyNZ6z nOoWPtPsLg2eZK/

            • Barbara Dukette
              That s where I saw the rattlesnake, also!  This is probably its home, and the redirector should be redirected.  Scary, scary.   Barbara (GiGi and JoJo) ...
              Message 6 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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                That's where I saw the rattlesnake, also!  This is probably its home, and the redirector should be redirected.  Scary, scary.
                 
                Barbara (GiGi and JoJo)

                --- On Mon, 3/2/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...> wrote:
                From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...>
                Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 6:03 AM

                Hello!
                After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
                yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
                redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided it
                was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.

                Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share with
                the newbie?

                Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking boots? I
                would like the ankle supports, if possible.

                Thanks!


              • Joe King
                I once went in for a quick grab in a park. I was zeroing out at a tree and saw the hole at the bottom of the tree and could see the bottom of a film canister.
                Message 7 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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                  I once went in for a quick grab in a park. I was zeroing out at a tree and saw the hole at the bottom of the tree and could see the bottom of a film canister. Walked up bent over stuck hand in without looking first and thought why would the cache owner put fur around the container. Pulled my hand out quick just as a face came out and nipped the very tip of my finger. Turns out that I had awoken a opossum from it's sleep. Luckily it was more of a scratch then a bite but I decided that it could have that cache and I moved on.

                  Ken/joeking


                  From: Doc <bcwatson@...>
                  To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, March 2, 2009 9:15:13 AM
                  Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes

                  Inspect all holes before sticking your hand in there!
                  I found a telephone-pole- sized fence post at GZ once.
                  It had a hole about 6" high by about 4" across about eye-level.
                  I was about to reach in and then shone the flashlight into the hole.
                  Good thing.  There staring back at me was a opossom baring his teeth!
                  Barry
                   
                  He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid him.
                  He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach him.
                  He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
                  He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.


                  --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Barb Jernigan <gumbietygress@ juno.com> wrote:

                  From: Barb Jernigan <gumbietygress@ juno.com>
                  Subject: Re: [CentralTexasGeocac hers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                  To: CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 7:56 AM


                  On Mon, 02 Mar 2009 12:03:05 -0000 "mrs.browning"
                  <mrs.browning@ yahoo.com> writes:
                  > Hello!
                  > After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
                  > yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
                  > redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided
                  > it
                  > was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.
                  >
                  > Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share with
                  > the newbie?
                  >
                  > Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking boots?
                  > I
                  > would like the ankle supports, if possible.
                  >
                  > Thanks!
                  >

                  Well, I did see a meter long garter snake up on Enchanted Rock, but they
                  don't worry me.
                  I've also seen Texas Ratsnakes, and there was the cutest little pencil
                  sized gartersnake once who was trying to convince me he was a 6 foot
                  rattler -- SO ferocious. Yeah.
                  My closer calls have been with fireants and scorpions.

                  That said, if you do not have a tool to poke under things with, there's
                  usually a stick around ... don't just stick your hand in there.
                  Walking staffs are good.
                  You'll want to invest in a small multitool as well -- sometimes it
                  requires pliers or other aid to extract a fat log from a little cache
                  container. [We find the fingernail cleaner tool excellent for those
                  tasks).

                  Boots.
                  Love my Merrels.
                  Both Waterweasel and I wear the Merrell Moab Ventilators -- as
                  comfortable as a boot can get in Texas Summers (breathable)
                  I get the mid-high, because I need the ankle support -- I see them listed
                  on line for $90, and the HushPuppie store in the Outlet Mall had them for
                  $80 (but not my size -- 9). REI and Cabelas carry them.
                  From the moment those suckers went on my feet, oh, 3 or 4 years ago, I've
                  been sure-footed and no 'break-in' period. Love 'em. Enchanted Rock
                  nearly finished them off (they've been dying for months), I need to track
                  down a new pair. Russ (Waterweasel) wears his as nearly his sole pair of
                  shoes -- he has plantar fascia and these are the cure.

                  Invest in good socks, too.

                  Even the competitive hikers will tell you: TAKE CARE OF YOUR FEET!

                  That also said ... Mrs Captain Picard is out there in Teva sandals. I
                  fear one exchange with grass burrs cured me of THAT.

                  So that's the Tygress' favorite boots.

                  But do have a care -- we share the outdoors with all kinds of critters.
                  Most don't care to mess with us (only fire ants seem to want to go out of
                  their way), but heads up is always good advise. [And poke before you
                  look!]
                  ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                  Digital Photography - Click Now.
                  http://thirdpartyof fers.juno. com/TGL2141/ fc/BLSrjpTDvmTGD hrcs7qVs52ojRsc9 lpkem9Bp49DyNZ6z nOoWPtPsLg2eZK/


                • deafdillos
                  After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous snakes (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was yesterday. At the Karma s TB
                  Message 8 of 20 , Mar 2, 2009
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                    After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous snakes
                    (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was
                    yesterday. At the Karma's TB Hotel cache, we found the cache that was
                    exposed due to the nearby pavement construction. I decided to move the
                    cache to other side of the tree. I gathered branches and sticks to
                    cover the cache. Right after dropping a large branch, a small
                    rattlesnake popped out of the hole in the branch. It was knocked out
                    then finally slithered away. What a scary moment! Yes I wore boots. No
                    bite.

                    Richard and Natalie
                    Deafdillos
                  • mrs.browning
                    ... Richard and Natalie, That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake
                    Message 9 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
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                      --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, "deafdillos"
                      <deafdillos@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous snakes
                      > (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was
                      > yesterday. At the Karma's TB Hotel cache, we found the cache that was
                      > exposed due to the nearby pavement construction. I decided to move the
                      > cache to other side of the tree. I gathered branches and sticks to
                      > cover the cache. Right after dropping a large branch, a small
                      > rattlesnake popped out of the hole in the branch. It was knocked out
                      > then finally slithered away. What a scary moment! Yes I wore boots. No
                      > bite.
                      >
                      > Richard and Natalie
                      > Deafdillos
                      >

                      Richard and Natalie,
                      That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with
                      poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake when
                      he was 3. It leaped up and got him right between the forefinger and
                      thumb. I had no idea how to identify venomous vs. nonvenomous bites
                      then, until the paramedics got there. They said, in a nutshell,
                      venomous snakes will leave puncture marks from their fangs. The snake
                      that bit our son left four scratches from its TEETH (shudder). He was
                      fine.

                      My friend also said that there is a vaccine for dogs. We usually take
                      our two dogs with us, and I hope that will scare away any snakes
                      waiting for us.

                      browningfamily/Dana
                    • mrs.browning
                      Richard and Natalie, That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake when
                      Message 10 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
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                        Richard and Natalie,
                        That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with
                        poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake when
                        he was 3. It leaped up and got him right between the forefinger and
                        thumb. I had no idea how to identify venomous vs. nonvenomous bites
                        then, until the paramedics got there. They said, in a nutshell,
                        venomous snakes will leave puncture marks from their fangs. The snake
                        that bit our son left four scratches from its TEETH (shudder). He was
                        fine.

                        My friend also said that there is a vaccine for dogs. We usually take
                        our two dogs with us, and I hope that will scare away any snakes
                        waiting for us.

                        browningfamily/Dana
                      • Doc
                        If you are ever out in nature, and are bitten by a snake and don t know if it is poisonous or not (or perhaps more especially if you do know it is
                        Message 11 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
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                          If you are ever out in nature, and are bitten by a snake and don't know if it is poisonous or not (or perhaps more especially if you "do know" it is poisonous), do the best you can to kill it and keep it with or near you.  That way, if you are not conscious when you are found, rescuers/medical personnel will know what you were bitten by and can administer the right anti-venom.
                          Barry
                           
                          He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid him.
                          He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach him.
                          He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
                          He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.


                          --- On Tue, 3/3/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...> wrote:

                          From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...>
                          Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Re: Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                          To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 6:03 AM

                          --- In CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com, "deafdillos"
                          <deafdillos@ ...> wrote:
                          >
                          > After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous snakes
                          > (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was
                          > yesterday. At the Karma's TB Hotel cache, we found the cache that was
                          > exposed due to the nearby pavement construction. I decided to move the
                          > cache to other side of the tree. I gathered branches and sticks to
                          > cover the cache. Right after dropping a large branch, a small
                          > rattlesnake popped out of the hole in the branch. It was knocked out
                          > then finally slithered away. What a scary moment! Yes I wore boots. No
                          > bite.
                          >
                          > Richard and Natalie
                          > Deafdillos
                          >

                          Richard and Natalie,
                          That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with
                          poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake when
                          he was 3. It leaped up and got him right between the forefinger and
                          thumb. I had no idea how to identify venomous vs. nonvenomous bites
                          then, until the paramedics got there. They said, in a nutshell,
                          venomous snakes will leave puncture marks from their fangs. The snake
                          that bit our son left four scratches from its TEETH (shudder). He was
                          fine.

                          My friend also said that there is a vaccine for dogs. We usually take
                          our two dogs with us, and I hope that will scare away any snakes
                          waiting for us.

                          browningfamily/ Dana


                        • Barb Jernigan
                          On Tue, 03 Mar 2009 12:03:34 -0000 mrs.browning ... good thought -- though when I was tagged by a garter snake (I still *see* it, though I was 3 or 4 at the
                          Message 12 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            On Tue, 03 Mar 2009 12:03:34 -0000 "mrs.browning"
                            <mrs.browning@...> writes:
                            > --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, "deafdillos"
                            > <deafdillos@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous
                            > snakes
                            > > (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was
                            > > yesterday. At the Karma's TB Hotel cache, we found the cache that
                            > was
                            > > exposed due to the nearby pavement construction. I decided to move
                            > the
                            > > cache to other side of the tree. I gathered branches and sticks
                            > to
                            > > cover the cache. Right after dropping a large branch, a small
                            > > rattlesnake popped out of the hole in the branch. It was knocked
                            > out
                            > > then finally slithered away. What a scary moment! Yes I wore
                            > boots. No
                            > > bite.
                            > >
                            > > Richard and Natalie
                            > > Deafdillos
                            > >
                            >
                            > Richard and Natalie,
                            > That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters
                            > with
                            > poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake
                            > when
                            > he was 3. It leaped up and got him right between the forefinger and
                            > thumb. I had no idea how to identify venomous vs. nonvenomous bites
                            > then, until the paramedics got there. They said, in a nutshell,
                            > venomous snakes will leave puncture marks from their fangs. The
                            > snake
                            > that bit our son left four scratches from its TEETH (shudder). He
                            > was fine.

                            good thought -- though when I was tagged by a garter snake (I still *see*
                            it, though I was 3 or 4 at the time), it left distinct fang marks and my
                            hand swelled....
                            Totally freaked out my folks (well, we were an hour by rubber raft from
                            even the campsite -- two hours from medical help).
                            Though the phobia has calmed a great deal, snakes and I agree to
                            appreciate each other from a distance.

                            > My friend also said that there is a vaccine for dogs. We usually

                            There is

                            > take
                            > our two dogs with us, and I hope that will scare away any snakes
                            > waiting for us.

                            Well, remember, a snake's instinct isn't always to run, but to find a
                            defensive position.

                            Let's face it, poisonous critter interactions are rare, and bites rarer
                            and rarer still.
                            Just be sensible -- which is tough in the heat of a caching moment.
                            [Having ended up with a handful of scorpion myself -- we both went
                            AUUUGH! and leapt our separate ways. (Actually, they were silent AUGHS --
                            owner/muggle was watching, don't know if he even caught the whole
                            interaction. No harm, no foul ... just a bit of adrenalin lost to time.)

                            And, well, if there is a snake (or possum or coon or skunk) coiled around
                            one of MY caches -- send a photo and I'll give you the smiley. You don't
                            have to tattoo your sig on any hides (or vice versa).

                            =grins!=

                            BarbJ/Tygress
                            ____________________________________________________________
                            Cheap Diet Help Tips. Click here.
                            http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/BLSrjpTMertibRiAidVLwd7dgCb2FL0JiAEFeQJwaWFYANGHykU8RHM3uxC/
                          • Carlinlb
                            Great idea Barry, but how does one kill a snake? I have awful aim with rocks! I ve seen a number of snakes and a couple of fang marks. If bitten, poisonous
                            Message 13 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Great idea Barry, but how does one kill a snake? I have awful aim
                              with rocks!

                              I've seen a number of snakes and a couple of fang marks. If bitten,
                              poisonous snakes leave fang marks (one or two) and also there is
                              instant swelling and other sensations. Non poisonous snakes cause no
                              extreme pain or swelling.

                              Most poisonous snakes in Texas have blurry vertical patchy marks.
                              None have horizontal stripes. The cotton mouth water moccasin can
                              appear as solid dark or black color. So in general, if you come
                              across a solid green snake or one with horizontal stripes along the
                              length of the body, it's a friend.

                              Carlin

                              --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, Doc <bcwatson@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > If you are ever out in nature, and are bitten by a snake and don't
                              know if it is poisonous or not (or perhaps more especially if you "do
                              know" it is poisonous), do the best you can to kill it and keep it
                              with or near you.  That way, if you are not conscious when you are
                              found, rescuers/medical personnel will know what you were bitten by
                              and can administer the right anti-venom.
                              >
                              > Barry
                              >  
                              > He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid
                              him.
                              > He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach
                              him.
                              > He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
                              > He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.
                              >
                              > --- On Tue, 3/3/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...>
                              > Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Re: Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                              > To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                              > Date: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 6:03 AM
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com, "deafdillos"
                              > <deafdillos@ ...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous
                              snakes
                              > > (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was
                              > > yesterday. At the Karma's TB Hotel cache, we found the cache that
                              was
                              > > exposed due to the nearby pavement construction. I decided to
                              move the
                              > > cache to other side of the tree. I gathered branches and sticks to
                              > > cover the cache. Right after dropping a large branch, a small
                              > > rattlesnake popped out of the hole in the branch. It was knocked
                              out
                              > > then finally slithered away. What a scary moment! Yes I wore
                              boots. No
                              > > bite.
                              > >
                              > > Richard and Natalie
                              > > Deafdillos
                              > >
                              >
                              > Richard and Natalie,
                              > That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with
                              > poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake
                              when
                              > he was 3. It leaped up and got him right between the forefinger and
                              > thumb. I had no idea how to identify venomous vs. nonvenomous bites
                              > then, until the paramedics got there. They said, in a nutshell,
                              > venomous snakes will leave puncture marks from their fangs. The
                              snake
                              > that bit our son left four scratches from its TEETH (shudder). He
                              was
                              > fine.
                              >
                              > My friend also said that there is a vaccine for dogs. We usually
                              take
                              > our two dogs with us, and I hope that will scare away any snakes
                              > waiting for us.
                              >
                              > browningfamily/ Dana
                              >
                            • Doc
                              You do what you can...  don t pick up a small stone, pick up the largest you can and just drop it on him...  or use a branch...   main thing is to kill it
                              Message 14 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                You do what you can...  don't pick up a small stone, pick up the largest you can and just drop it on him...  or use a branch...   main thing is to kill it so people who know, will be able identify it...   even if you are still able to get yourself to the ER, you should bring the snake (make sure it doesn't get loose in the ER...) so they can make sure...
                                 
                                You don't want to answer their question with "I don't know..."
                                Barry
                                 
                                He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid him.
                                He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach him.
                                He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
                                He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.


                                --- On Tue, 3/3/09, Carlinlb <carlinlb@...> wrote:

                                From: Carlinlb <carlinlb@...>
                                Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Re: Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                                To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 8:27 AM

                                Great idea Barry, but how does one kill a snake? I have awful aim
                                with rocks!

                                I've seen a number of snakes and a couple of fang marks. If bitten,
                                poisonous snakes leave fang marks (one or two) and also there is
                                instant swelling and other sensations. Non poisonous snakes cause no
                                extreme pain or swelling.

                                Most poisonous snakes in Texas have blurry vertical patchy marks.
                                None have horizontal stripes. The cotton mouth water moccasin can
                                appear as solid dark or black color. So in general, if you come
                                across a solid green snake or one with horizontal stripes along the
                                length of the body, it's a friend.

                                Carlin

                                --- In CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com, Doc <bcwatson@.. .>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                > If you are ever out in nature, and are bitten by a snake and don't
                                know if it is poisonous or not (or perhaps more especially if you "do
                                know" it is poisonous), do the best you can to kill it and keep it
                                with or near you.  That way, if you are not conscious when you are
                                found, rescuers/medical personnel will know what you were bitten by
                                and can administer the right anti-venom.
                                >
                                > Barry
                                >  
                                > He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid
                                him.
                                > He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach
                                him.
                                > He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
                                > He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.
                                >
                                > --- On Tue, 3/3/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@ ...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                > From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@ ...>
                                > Subject: [CentralTexasGeocac hers] Re: Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                                > To: CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com
                                > Date: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 6:03 AM
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com, "deafdillos"
                                > <deafdillos@ ...> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous
                                snakes
                                > > (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was
                                > > yesterday. At the Karma's TB Hotel cache, we found the cache that
                                was
                                > > exposed due to the nearby pavement construction. I decided to
                                move the
                                > > cache to other side of the tree. I gathered branches and sticks to
                                > > cover the cache. Right after dropping a large branch, a small
                                > > rattlesnake popped out of the hole in the branch. It was knocked
                                out
                                > > then finally slithered away. What a scary moment! Yes I wore
                                boots. No
                                > > bite.
                                > >
                                > > Richard and Natalie
                                > > Deafdillos
                                > >
                                >
                                > Richard and Natalie,
                                > That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with
                                > poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake
                                when
                                > he was 3. It leaped up and got him right between the forefinger and
                                > thumb. I had no idea how to identify venomous vs. nonvenomous bites
                                > then, until the paramedics got there. They said, in a nutshell,
                                > venomous snakes will leave puncture marks from their fangs. The
                                snake
                                > that bit our son left four scratches from its TEETH (shudder). He
                                was
                                > fine.
                                >
                                > My friend also said that there is a vaccine for dogs. We usually
                                take
                                > our two dogs with us, and I hope that will scare away any snakes
                                > waiting for us.
                                >
                                > browningfamily/ Dana
                                >


                              • jestrrrulz@aol.com
                                I just love the positive upbeat vibe I get from this group. ha ha Just kidding. Good advice. Jeri/JestrRulz In a message dated 3/3/2009 7:31:33 A.M. Central
                                Message 15 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I just love the positive upbeat vibe I get from this group. ha ha Just kidding. Good advice.
                                   
                                  Jeri/JestrRulz
                                   
                                  In a message dated 3/3/2009 7:31:33 A.M. Central Standard Time, bcwatson@... writes:
                                  do the best you can to kill it and keep it with or near you.  That way, if you are not conscious when you are found, rescuers/medical personnel will know what you were bitten by and can administer the right anti-venom.


                                  Worried about job security? Check out the 5 safest jobs in a recession.
                                • electric_water_boy
                                  And if you and the snake both die, then know that the guy who finds you is probably going to make boots, a belt, and/or a hat band out of that snake. Or if
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    And if you and the snake both die, then know that the guy who finds you is probably going to make boots, a belt, and/or a hat band out of that snake. Or if you survive, you can. Odds are, unless you're hurt in some other way as well you'll get out alive. You may be pretty messed up, but you'll live. That's beats the heck out of other parts of the world where you may make two steps after being bitten by a snake.

                                    --- In CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com, Doc <bcwatson@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > You do what you can...  don't pick up a small stone, pick up the largest you can and just drop it on him...  or use a branch...   main thing is to kill it so people who know, will be able identify it...   even if you are still able to get yourself to the ER, you should bring the snake (make sure it doesn't get loose in the ER...) so they can make sure...
                                    >  
                                    > You don't want to answer their question with "I don't know..."
                                    >
                                    > Barry
                                    >  
                                    > He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid him.
                                    > He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach him.
                                    > He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
                                    > He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.
                                    >
                                    > --- On Tue, 3/3/09, Carlinlb <carlinlb@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > From: Carlinlb <carlinlb@...>
                                    > Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Re: Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                                    > To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Date: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 8:27 AM
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Great idea Barry, but how does one kill a snake? I have awful aim
                                    > with rocks!
                                    >
                                    > I've seen a number of snakes and a couple of fang marks. If bitten,
                                    > poisonous snakes leave fang marks (one or two) and also there is
                                    > instant swelling and other sensations. Non poisonous snakes cause no
                                    > extreme pain or swelling.
                                    >
                                    > Most poisonous snakes in Texas have blurry vertical patchy marks.
                                    > None have horizontal stripes. The cotton mouth water moccasin can
                                    > appear as solid dark or black color. So in general, if you come
                                    > across a solid green snake or one with horizontal stripes along the
                                    > length of the body, it's a friend.
                                    >
                                    > Carlin
                                    >
                                    > --- In CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com, Doc <bcwatson@ .>
                                    > wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > If you are ever out in nature, and are bitten by a snake and don't
                                    > know if it is poisonous or not (or perhaps more especially if you "do
                                    > know" it is poisonous), do the best you can to kill it and keep it
                                    > with or near you.  That way, if you are not conscious when you are
                                    > found, rescuers/medical personnel will know what you were bitten by
                                    > and can administer the right anti-venom.
                                    > >
                                    > > Barry
                                    > >  
                                    > > He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is a fool; avoid
                                    > him.
                                    > > He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a student; teach
                                    > him.
                                    > > He who knows and knows not that he knows is asleep; wake him.
                                    > > He who knows and knows that he knows is a wise man; follow him.
                                    > >
                                    > > --- On Tue, 3/3/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@ ...> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@ ...>
                                    > > Subject: [CentralTexasGeocac hers] Re: Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                                    > > To: CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com
                                    > > Date: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 6:03 AM
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In CentralTexasGeocach ers@yahoogroups. com, "deafdillos"
                                    > > <deafdillos@ ...> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > After finding over 5,300 caches, we had encountered poisonous
                                    > snakes
                                    > > > (rattlesnakes and coral snake) six times. Most recent one was
                                    > > > yesterday. At the Karma's TB Hotel cache, we found the cache that
                                    > was
                                    > > > exposed due to the nearby pavement construction. I decided to
                                    > move the
                                    > > > cache to other side of the tree. I gathered branches and sticks to
                                    > > > cover the cache. Right after dropping a large branch, a small
                                    > > > rattlesnake popped out of the hole in the branch. It was knocked
                                    > out
                                    > > > then finally slithered away. What a scary moment! Yes I wore
                                    > boots. No
                                    > > > bite.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Richard and Natalie
                                    > > > Deafdillos
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Richard and Natalie,
                                    > > That is scary! I would like to hear about your other encounters with
                                    > > poisonous snakes. My son was bit in the backyard by a king snake
                                    > when
                                    > > he was 3. It leaped up and got him right between the forefinger and
                                    > > thumb. I had no idea how to identify venomous vs. nonvenomous bites
                                    > > then, until the paramedics got there. They said, in a nutshell,
                                    > > venomous snakes will leave puncture marks from their fangs. The
                                    > snake
                                    > > that bit our son left four scratches from its TEETH (shudder). He
                                    > was
                                    > > fine.
                                    > >
                                    > > My friend also said that there is a vaccine for dogs. We usually
                                    > take
                                    > > our two dogs with us, and I hope that will scare away any snakes
                                    > > waiting for us.
                                    > >
                                    > > browningfamily/ Dana
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • Robert Thompson
                                    I not have run into snakes but have almost stepped on a rattle snake. I now wear hiking boots in the winter and high top snake proof boots during the summer. A
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Mar 3, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      I not have run into snakes but have almost stepped on a rattle snake. I now wear hiking boots in the winter and high top snake proof boots during the summer. A nice size rattle snakes fangs can go through your standard hiking boot. That is if it does strike above the top of the regular hiking boots. Invest in some good snkae proof boots.

                                      --- On Mon, 3/2/09, mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...> wrote:
                                      From: mrs.browning <mrs.browning@...>
                                      Subject: [CentralTexasGeocachers] Snakes and Hiking Shoes
                                      To: CentralTexasGeocachers@yahoogroups.com
                                      Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 6:03 AM

                                      Hello!
                                      After seeing my second snake in three months of winter geocaching
                                      yesterday, and reading a log about a rattlesnake near the second
                                      redirector of the cache I was chasing (Trailhead Trial), I decided it
                                      was time to invest in a pair of good hiking boots.

                                      Anyone had any encounters with snakes they would like to share with
                                      the newbie?

                                      Also, does anyone recommend a good pair of comfortable hiking boots? I
                                      would like the ankle supports, if possible.

                                      Thanks!


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