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Central Texas Regional Assoc

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  • teamtroglodyte
    Teams in the Houston area are working on putting together a regional assoc for geocaching. Anyone interested in helping to put this together may email me. We
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 12, 2002
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      Teams in the Houston area are working on putting together a regional
      assoc for geocaching. Anyone interested in helping to put this
      together may email me. We had a first meeting on Nov 2 to dicuss the
      basic to get the ball rolling. We will be dicussing with other area
      member on Dec 7th at Ryans in Houston. You can check out the Houstan
      area web page for information @ www.houstoncachers.org.

      Looking forward to hearing from all team with some input and any
      information you would like to see running on web page.

      Diann & Gary
      Team Troglodyte
    • Eoghan
      This post and a few things that have happened in my new home town have got me thinking about local geocaching groups. Since I m not really a part of the
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 14, 2002
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        This post and a few things that have happened in my new home town
        have got me thinking about local geocaching groups. Since I'm not
        really a part of the Central Texas community anymore I might not have
        much room to talk, but here goes anyway. Please excuse me if this
        gets too long or comes across as too arrogant.

        When I was in Austin it seemed like most people were happy with a
        really informal, but very friendly and helpful group that could
        discuss geocaching at events whenever someone decided to put one
        together. But with geocaching growing so quickly and the issue of
        dealing with land managers becoming so much more important, it seems
        like organizations are inevitable. It even seems sometimes like
        they're superseding the idea of anyone-can-organize-it event caches.
        I've always liked the somewhat underground nature of geocaching where
        things are hidden in almost plain site with only those who are a part
        of the game knowing that they are there. That's probably the same
        anti-social, non-joiner, subersive part of me that makes my antennaes
        stand up when people start to "organize" others. I also liked the
        Wild West days of "hide it where you like, no one will know it's
        there." I liked being able to read the description of _every_ new
        cache that was placed somewhere in the US, and being able to find the
        time to hit every new local cache. I liked being able to follow who
        found what when, and all the other aspects of a small, informal
        community of participants. But I know that those days are long gone
        now. (There are also a lot of great things about the overwhelming
        diversity and shear number of options you get with a big popular
        hobby, it's just that there are trade-offs and its unlikely that you
        can ever go back)

        It seems that with so many new people caching, there will be a group
        whether everyone wants it or not. When you get enough people together
        there's bound to be at least one or two Born Organizers who thrive on
        bylaws, voting on officers, regularized meeting schedules, etc. (Some
        are natural Bureaucrats, some just thrive on social groups.)
        Here in my new home, one of these Organizers put together an event
        cache that effectively formed an official local organization. He was,
        not too surprisingly, the only one who ran for the office of
        President. With a little cajoling, someone else volunteered for Vice-
        President. There was enough resistance (or apathy, depending on your
        perspective) that we didn't formalized any rules of order or bylaws.
        The group will probably end up being a really positive thing. I just
        felt in a way that those who'd been caching in this area for a long
        time were relegated to a back seat position by default. I might add
        that at the time, the event was the second 'cache' the Organizer had
        hidden and that he had found just two or three caches himself at the
        time.

        I'm NOT saying this to belittle him or anyone else who's just started
        geocaching, and I'm NOT saying that Organizers are a bad thing. Most
        of these people end up putting into a group more than they ever get
        out of it and everyone involved gets to reap the rewards of their
        efforts. My thought on the issue is that since it seems like it's
        going to happen one way or another, it's a good idea for those who
        have been at it for awhile (either in time or in number found) to go
        ahead and do it before someone else does it for them in a way which
        they may or may not be happy with.

        I _personally_ like the informal nature of what Team Troglodyte put
        together for Houston much better than the more formal group that
        exists in DFW. Again, I'm not saying it's a better way of doing it,
        just that I like those types of groups better. ( <jest> I'll also
        admit that I still have enough regional jingoism in my soul to hope
        that Austin/San Antonio will form its own organization separate from
        those other big, rather inferior Texas cities...</jest> )
        In a sense, Austin has the oldest 'community' of geocachers, since
        Austin was actually the place where the _first_event_cache_ever_ was
        held. So Austinites/SanAntonians have been getting together as a
        group for longer than anyone else by that standard even if only
        informally. It would be great to see that community stay together.

        So, I guess my point is that I hope that those of you who've been at
        it for awhile in the Austin area (and who might care one way or the
        other about the issue) make the move to start your own group in a way
        that makes you happy before you get annexed into someone else's group
        or find yourself outside of a group someone else formed in you own
        back yard.


        ----------------------------------------------------------
        <teamtroglodyte@y...> wrote:
        > Teams in the Houston area are working on putting together a
        regional
        > assoc for geocaching. Anyone interested in helping to put this
        > together may email me. We had a first meeting on Nov 2 to dicuss
        the
        > basic to get the ball rolling. We will be dicussing with other area
        > member on Dec 7th at Ryans in Houston. You can check out the
        Houstan
        > area web page for information @ www.houstoncachers.org.
        >
        > Looking forward to hearing from all team with some input and any
        > information you would like to see running on web page.
      • Mark Gessner
        We faced a similar situation up in Dallas when forming the Recumbent Bike Enthusiasts of North Texas. Started with five people riding comfy laid-back bikes,
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 15, 2002
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          We faced a similar situation up in Dallas when forming the "Recumbent
          Bike Enthusiasts of North Texas." Started with five people riding
          comfy laid-back bikes, currently the membership is something like 200
          riders. All suggestions at officially organizing the club have always
          been shot down by popular outcry. The club started in November 1996,
          and six years later still has no bylaws, mandatory meetings, or club
          officers. Membership increases every year, and there are members all
          over the country now. http://www.rbent.org All work is done by
          volunteers (webmasters, email list maintainers, ride leaders). Anyone
          wanting to call an event simply announces it to the email list.

          I think this could be a model for the central texas geocaching
          organization. An organization that steadfastly refuses to be
          'organized.' It can be done.

          -mark.

          On Thursday, November 14, 2002, at 09:40 PM, Eoghan wrote:

          > This post and a few things that have happened in my new home town
          > have got me thinking about local geocaching groups. Since I'm not
          > really a part of the Central Texas community anymore I might not have
          > much room to talk, but here goes anyway. Please excuse me if this
          > gets too long or comes across as too arrogant.
        • Rich Wendling
          I m not from Central Texas, but here s my 2 cents anyway... There are advantages and disadvantages to formal organizations. The biggest advantages I see would
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 15, 2002
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            I'm not from Central Texas, but here's my 2 cents anyway...

            There are advantages and disadvantages to formal organizations.

            The biggest advantages I see would be in dealing with other
            organizations - government agencies, the media, etc. A
            formal "organization" will tend to have more influence than a bunch
            of people who happen to be interested in the same things. An
            organization doesn't have to be overly organized. NTGA still hasn't
            defined what a "member" is, and has no finances or by-laws (yet). We
            do have a website (www.ntga.net) that is voluntarily run, and we do
            have officers, although we haven't defined what they actually do.

            The biggest disadvantage is often that the organization sometimes can
            get so big and cumbersome that it forgets what it's there for.
            Politics and infighting can cause problems.

            Decide for yourselves how "organized" you want to get. Or, sit back
            and watch as NTGA and other geocaching clubs evolve, and then decide
            what you want to do.

            Rich Wendling
            aka Web-ling
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