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Any cat behaviorists here ?

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  • Janet
    I have four indoor cats and two outdoor cats. I have been cultivating trust with Pretti Gurl, a calico, in my neighborhood for a few years. She will now come
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 3, 2013
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      I have four indoor cats and two outdoor cats. I have been cultivating trust with Pretti Gurl, a calico, in my neighborhood for a few years. She will now come on my deck, rub up against me, eat while I sit right next to her, and will allow me to pet her and feed her treats from my hand. (I am in hopes of getting her to the Vet for leukemia and aids tests before winter.)

      There's been a big yellow and white striped cat, Old Yeller, in our neighborhood for a few years who, up until this week, has run like the devil if you even looked at him. Just within the last week he will now get about two car lengths from me and wait for me to put food down ( I must vacate the area for him to come up on the deck and eat it though). He will also listen to me talk to him and he'll look towards me when I'm talking rather than, again, running like a crazy cat.

      I'm fairly sure that Old Yeller is a male and Pretti Gurl is a female. I've seen Pretti Gurl chase other cats away and especially get very angry and hissy with another outside male cat that kind of belongs to a neighbor (this cat was abandoned and they have adopted him but he has to stay outside - they've built him a cozy house and feed him and take him to the Vets when needed. same with Pretti Gurl and I - I've kind of adopted her but she must remain outside)

      Here's the weird thing: Pretti Gurl, who usually hisses and growls at any cat who tries to come up on "her" deck not only allows Old Yeller up on the deck - they will eat side by side from the same plate ! I'm not sure I understand that.
      Another thing I don't get is this - Just a few days ago, I saw Pretti Gurl peeing on my lawn: she'd pee - move a few feet - pee - move a few feet, etc. I'd expect that from a male who is marking his territory maybe, but a female cat ?? If anyone can help me to understand these two situations, that'd be great.

      Take Care, Janet Baker


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Donald
      Janet, see below . . . ... Cats have friends just like we do. They could also have been littermates. As for the calico being female, it s something you could
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 5, 2013
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        Janet,

        see below . . .

        On 4 Sep 2013 12:03:13 -0000, CatVet@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        >Here's the weird thing: Pretti Gurl, who usually hisses and growls at any cat who tries to come up on "her" deck not only allows Old Yeller up on the deck - they will eat side by side from the same plate ! I'm not sure I understand that.

        Cats have friends just like we do. They could also have been
        littermates.

        As for the calico being female, it's something you could bet on.
        Almost 100% of calicos or tortouise shell cats are female. The very
        few that aren't female are sterile males.

        >Another thing I don't get is this - Just a few days ago, I saw Pretti Gurl peeing on my lawn: she'd pee - move a few feet - pee - move a few feet, etc. I'd expect that from a male who is marking his territory maybe, but a female cat ?? If anyone can help me to understand these two situations, that'd be great.

        Females mark territory also at times, especially if they feel
        threatened. That's why some pee in the house when there are more than
        one female in the house. We've had that latter issue at one time.

        Donald
      • CatWoman
        ... Definitely both males and females use urine for territorial marking. Probably happens more with the wild cats - but if the cats are related, it seems not
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 8, 2013
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          On 9/5/2013 4:20 PM, Donald wrote:
          > Females mark territory also at times, especially if they feel
          > threatened. That's why some pee in the house when there are more than
          > one female in the house. We've had that latter issue at one time.

          Definitely both males and females use urine for territorial
          marking. Probably happens more with the wild cats - but if
          the cats are related, it seems not to be as big an issue. I
          had one that would pee on the bed after I brought home the
          mother of the two boys I'd brought home 18 months earlier.

          I think it was not a reaction to a new female as much as *her*.
          She was a small cat, and the two boys thought she was fun to
          play with. Since she was already a dignified 4 years old, she
          disagreed - but didn't act out until she identified Gaia as
          the "cause" of the Horrid Grey Things.

          I suspect that a cat that is I/O is going to be more conscious
          of territory than indoor-only cats. I do know that with the
          colony the 3 mentioned above came from, there were about 5
          males (all but one fixed), who hung around together - but there
          was only one female in the colony at a time.

          dg
        • irisfromoh
          ... Definitely both males and females use urine for territorial marking. Probably happens more with the wild cats - but if the cats are related, it seems not
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 9, 2013
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            GOOD ANSWER, dg!!! I have a pride of five, with only two litter mates. The middle kitty, who was VERY young when she moved in, used to pee on MY bed and mine only. I bought incontinence pads for when I made my bed. When she peed, I exhibited blatantly angry behavior (didn't hurt nor yell, but sternly said, "No, no, no!" It stopped and the little copy cat began to use the Alpha cat's litter box too. We have six boxes strategically placed around the house. Remember, it may not  be apparent, but they DO desire to please their guardians. Use it to your advantage =)


            Iris Marie 



            --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, <catvet@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            On 9/5/2013 4:20 PM, Donald wrote:
            > Females mark territory also at times, especially if they feel
            > threatened. That's why some pee in the house when there are more than
            > one female in the house. We've had that latter issue at one time.

            Definitely both males and females use urine for territorial
            marking. Probably happens more with the wild cats - but if
            the cats are related, it seems not to be as big an issue. I
            had one that would pee on the bed after I brought home the
            mother of the two boys I'd brought home 18 months earlier.

            I think it was not a reaction to a new female as much as *her*.
            She was a small cat, and the two boys thought she was fun to
            play with. Since she was already a dignified 4 years old, she
            disagreed - but didn't act out until she identified Gaia as
            the "cause" of the Horrid Grey Things.

            I suspect that a cat that is I/O is going to be more conscious
            of territory than indoor-only cats. I do know that with the
            colony the 3 mentioned above came from, there were about 5
            males (all but one fixed), who hung around together - but there
            was only one female in the colony at a time.

            dg
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