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Re: weaning kittens

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  • toomanyfurs
    ... I ve always weaned onto canned food, or in a pinch, crushed grain free kibble mixed with formula. Evaporated milk and oatmeal doesn t sound as if it would
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 29, 2012
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      --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, "Pam" <crochetingkitty@...> wrote:
      >
      > I didn't have a problem weaning the last litter, or the current litter of Lhasa Apso puppies that I have, but this current litter of purebred bluepoint siamese kittens is driving me crazy! I can't get them to wean no matter what I do or how many times I try. I'm trying to wean them on evaporated milk and baby oatmeal. Does anyone have any help or ideas so that I can get these babies off their mama's milk?
      > Thanks for any advice,
      > Pam
      >

      I've always weaned onto canned food, or in a pinch, crushed grain free kibble mixed with formula. Evaporated milk and oatmeal doesn't sound as if it would be something to entice a kitten. How old are they? Do they try Mom's food?

      You could also try Kitten Glop, and once they will eat (or wear) that, add canned to it.

      http://www.hdw-inc.com/glop.htm

      Margo nav
    • Pamela Schad
      Thank you so much for the info. I will try it. I will try almost anything! LOL These little guys (the cutest kittens you ve ever seen, it will be hard to give
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 29, 2012
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        Thank you so much for the info. I will try it. I will try almost anything! LOL These little guys (the cutest kittens you've ever seen, it will be hard to give them up when I sell them) are running all over the "birthing and raising" room, so I know they are ready for wearning. Their point colors are coming in beautifully. Thank you again!
        Hugs,
        Pam

        --- On Fri, 6/29/12, LexxBirdLady <lexxbirdlady@...> wrote:


        From: LexxBirdLady <lexxbirdlady@...>
        Subject: Re: [CatVet] weaning kittens
        To: "CatVet@yahoogroups.com" <CatVet@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Friday, June 29, 2012, 2:16 PM



         



        just buy wet kitten food at the pet shop/store. fancy feast now has a kitten food and Nutro has a good kitten food, too. the stink is what attracts them to eat the food. stir it up good so it's like a slurry and they'll prob. suck it up.
        lol, when my simba was weaning, lol, he would be like a vacuum and by the time he was near the end of eating he'd have both arms nearly straight forward and still slurping up the wet food, lmao, it was like he just slid into his food as he ate it! lol, funniest thing i've ever seen!!! and EVERY morning i had to wash his arms from his arm pits to his toes lol!!!  since i'd done that for nearly 3weeks, last night,
        while i was washing my hands, simba was on the counter and i asked him if he wanted to wash his hands? and he mewed, and i asked him again and he came over to the sink and i held him like i used to when he was little (he's 13.5 pounds now! LOL) and i ran his hands under the water and washed them then dried them - he loved it! LOL
        such a sweetie at times and SO smart lol :-))
        but i only managed to wash one hand on miss zena, hated it! LOL

        Sharon


        ________________________________
        From: Pam <crochetingkitty@...>
        To: CatVet@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 5:12 PM
        Subject: [CatVet] weaning kittens


         

        I didn't have a problem weaning the last litter, or the current litter of Lhasa Apso puppies that I have, but this current litter of purebred bluepoint siamese kittens is driving me crazy! I can't get them to wean no matter what I do or how many times I try. I'm trying to wean them on evaporated milk and baby oatmeal. Does anyone have any help or ideas so that I can get these babies off their mama's milk?
        Thanks for any advice,
        Pam

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Iris
        It has been my experience that the mother weans the kittens on her own, with the right encouragement. If she brings kittens with her when she eats and they eat
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 29, 2012
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          It has been my experience that the mother weans the kittens on her own, with the right encouragement. If she brings kittens with her when she eats and they eat with her, they eventually eat more solid food and she gets tired of their double dipping. I have never been involved in weaning kittens other than that. How old are the kittens? Are they old enough to eat on their own and develop a taste for cat food?

          Sr. Iris Marie

          --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, "Pam" <crochetingkitty@...> wrote:
          >
          > I didn't have a problem weaning the last litter, or the current litter of Lhasa Apso puppies that I have, but this current litter of purebred bluepoint siamese kittens is driving me crazy! I can't get them to wean no matter what I do or how many times I try. I'm trying to wean them on evaporated milk and baby oatmeal. Does anyone have any help or ideas so that I can get these babies off their mama's milk?
          > Thanks for any advice,
          > Pam
          >
        • felidae217
          I had the same problem with this recent litter I rescued... I heard the Moms wean at around 8 weeks or even earlier, but it was 12 weeks and still she was
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 3 2:43 AM
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            I had the same problem with this recent litter I rescued...
            I heard the Moms wean at around 8 weeks or even earlier, but it was 12 weeks and still she was nursing them many times a day!

            Nothing worked except complete separation during which Momma cat cried for days on end and her mammaries swelled. I felt terrible about separating them. But we needed the swelling to subside at least some before the spay surgery. Finally when she got spayed, the mammaries went back to normal though she is on Clavamox in case of an infection...

            Sara

            --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, "Iris" <irisfromohio@...> wrote:
            >
            > It has been my experience that the mother weans the kittens on her own, with the right encouragement. If she brings kittens with her when she eats and they eat with her, they eventually eat more solid food and she gets tired of their double dipping. I have never been involved in weaning kittens other than that. How old are the kittens? Are they old enough to eat on their own and develop a taste for cat food?
            >
            > Sr. Iris Marie
            >
            > --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, "Pam" <crochetingkitty@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I didn't have a problem weaning the last litter, or the current litter of Lhasa Apso puppies that I have, but this current litter of purebred bluepoint siamese kittens is driving me crazy! I can't get them to wean no matter what I do or how many times I try. I'm trying to wean them on evaporated milk and baby oatmeal. Does anyone have any help or ideas so that I can get these babies off their mama's milk?
            > > Thanks for any advice,
            > > Pam
            > >
            >
          • scampsangel
            I rescued a mommy cat and her one surviving kitten from a barn several years ago where they were being severely neglected. The mom had a litter of 5 kittens
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 6 7:26 AM
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              I rescued a mommy cat and her one surviving kitten from a barn several years ago where they were being severely neglected. The mom had a litter of 5 kittens and 4 died within the first couple of days. The only survivor was VERY sick so I took them both to the vet and it turned out he had a bot-fly larvae imbedded in his neck and he was septic. The vet operated to remove the larva and debride the area & I brought them both home so I could take care of the wound & give medicine & TLC. I ended up keeping them both until they died many years later.

              Onyx (the mommy) & Corona (baby Cory) were EXTREMELY close for their entire lives - they slept together and mommy would bathe Cory long after he was an adult. We had an issue with the nursing, too, because she nursed him LONG beyond the 8-12 week period that is typical. My vet said to just let it go because it was obviously filling a need for both of them. Eventually this stopped, but the snuggling & bathing lasted for many years. She was a young mommy & Cory was the only surviving baby and I think they just needed each other.

              --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, "felidae217" <felidae217@...> wrote:
              >
              > I had the same problem with this recent litter I rescued...
              > I heard the Moms wean at around 8 weeks or even earlier, but it was 12 weeks and still she was nursing them many times a day!
              >
              > Nothing worked except complete separation during which Momma cat cried for days on end and her mammaries swelled. I felt terrible about separating them. But we needed the swelling to subside at least some before the spay surgery. Finally when she got spayed, the mammaries went back to normal though she is on Clavamox in case of an infection...
              >
              > Sara
              >
              > --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, "Iris" <irisfromohio@> wrote:
              > >
              > > It has been my experience that the mother weans the kittens on her own, with the right encouragement. If she brings kittens with her when she eats and they eat with her, they eventually eat more solid food and she gets tired of their double dipping. I have never been involved in weaning kittens other than that. How old are the kittens? Are they old enough to eat on their own and develop a taste for cat food?
              > >
              > > Sr. Iris Marie
              > >
              > > --- In CatVet@yahoogroups.com, "Pam" <crochetingkitty@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I didn't have a problem weaning the last litter, or the current litter of Lhasa Apso puppies that I have, but this current litter of purebred bluepoint siamese kittens is driving me crazy! I can't get them to wean no matter what I do or how many times I try. I'm trying to wean them on evaporated milk and baby oatmeal. Does anyone have any help or ideas so that I can get these babies off their mama's milk?
              > > > Thanks for any advice,
              > > > Pam
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • CatWoman
              ... Well - there *is* another way... Shelley was the local kitten factory from about 1998 to 2004. In 2004 I was allowed to shut down the factory by Shelley s
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 7 10:45 PM
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                On 7/3/2012 2:43 AM, felidae217 wrote:
                > I had the same problem with this recent litter I rescued...
                > I heard the Moms wean at around 8 weeks or even earlier, but it was 12 weeks and still she was nursing them many times a day!

                Well - there *is* another way...

                Shelley was the local kitten factory from about 1998 to 2004.

                In 2004 I was allowed to shut down the factory by Shelley's
                person. That year's production run had already been delivered,
                though.

                I brought the whole family to my place to be sure there was no
                inadvertent restart, and had Shelley and then her kittens
                fixed (at 10 weeks - at 8 weeks, one of the males was trying
                to mount one of his sisters).

                As Shelley recovered, she wanted back outside - and since I
                was not legal owner, I let her go out. She spent that summer
                bringing dead things to teach her kittens to hunt. I did not
                want that to happen - so she would leave the dead thing on
                my stoop, and come in.

                The kittens were born in late March, 2004. Shelley would come
                in, meatloaf, and then get pushed over and nursed on until
                *October*. At which time she stopped coming inside.

                I was given custody of her permanently in 2008, and while she
                no longer hissed at the (now 4+ year old) kittens, she also
                didn't allow them to nurse on her - though there was a couple
                of attempts...

                So I'd say that 7 months is about the limit of what a mother
                who doesn't have another litter to deal with will put up with.

                8-)

                dg
                (that said - she still washes their ears. As well as the
                other two that are not directly her offspring. You can
                take the reproduction out of the cat, but for a "mothering"
                cat, it lasts a lifetime. Another mom-cat I had, Gaia,
                also washed any ears that were in her vicinity.)
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