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extremes of commuting

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  • De Clarke
    http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2004/01/31/dont_like_the_traffic_try_this_340_mile_commute/ this guy commutes 340 miles/day. obviously
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 31, 2004
      http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2004/01/31/dont_like_the_traffic_try_this_340_mile_commute/

      this guy commutes 340 miles/day.

      obviously some people are willing to spend hours of each day in transit
      -- I can't figure it out, myself. in this case it seems to be the old
      "have cake and eat it too" impulse, the person who wants to live out in
      the country, yet work at a (very) lucrative job in the big city.

      here's a case where train service is being used to support an (imho)
      insanely hypermobile life.

      I met a guy in TX once who commuted 100 mi each way to work and back --
      2 hours each way, 4 hours a day. but this is even weirder.

      de

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    • Rachel
      This is more common than you realize in places like Oklahoma, where I used to live and Arizona, where I live now. Some of the people did move out to the
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 1, 2004
        This is more common than you realize in places like Oklahoma, where I
        used to live and Arizona, where I live now. Some of the people did
        move out to the country and have to come into the city to work, but
        most are ones who grew up in the country, in small towns where they
        know everyone and their families are. They don't want to move away
        but there are not jobs close by.

        They carpool, or if available, take a bus. When I took Greyhound
        east over Christmas break, a few dozen were waiting at Abilene TX at
        the wee hours of the morning, to take the Greyhound bus into Fort
        Worth or Dallas TX. This means a 3.5 hour trip each way each day.
        Most of them promptly went to sleep for the trip. Extra buses are
        planned for. I was amazed as I hate getting up at 5:30 to get to
        work.

        I also want to weight in on the bus/bike discussion. I used to live
        3 miles from work and walked and rode my bike, about 50% each. I've
        now moved 10 miles from my work so I could have better bus service
        and rarely ride my bike anymore. I think nothing of walking a couple
        miles to a store but I enjoy not having to take a bike.

        I agree with Simon on the bother of having to lock up my bike
        everywhere and feeling tied to it. With transit I get everywhere
        faster and can read while I'm on the bus. The bus line I'm on now
        runs every 10 minutes during the week, 15 minutes on Saturday and 30
        minutes on Sunday, which is excellent for Tucson.

        I've been without a car since 1997 (this time) and enjoy not having a
        car though I do rent a car very occasionally and take a taxi
        sometimes. I also enjoy riding a bike but not as a necessity. I
        work at the University of Arizona which not only has plenty of bike
        parking but I even have access to a locked bike cage and showers. I
        just prefer to walk or take the bus.
      • Bijan Soleymani
        ... This is the main reason I prefer the bike to the bus. I m not forced to move further away to be able to justify taking the bus. I can live a walkable
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 1, 2004
          "Rachel" <rachel@...> writes:

          > I also want to weight in on the bus/bike discussion. I used to live
          > 3 miles from work and walked and rode my bike, about 50% each. I've
          > now moved 10 miles from my work so I could have better bus service
          > and rarely ride my bike anymore. I think nothing of walking a couple
          > miles to a store but I enjoy not having to take a bike.

          This is the main reason I prefer the bike to the bus. I'm not forced
          to move further away to be able to justify taking the bus. I can live
          a walkable distance away, but still bike. Living a walkable distance
          away and taking the bus... I also enjoy not having to take the bus.

          > I agree with Simon on the bother of having to lock up my bike
          > everywhere and feeling tied to it.

          I just lock up my bike and forget about it. I always keep my bike
          locked outside. Right now it's locked to a no-parking sign outside my
          apartment :)

          > With transit I get everywhere faster and can read while I'm on the
          > bus.

          I don't know about everywhere... For short distances the bike tends to
          be faster. I can bike 3 miles in 12 minutes. Taking the bus 3 miles
          you have to walk to the bus stop, wait for the bus, walk from the bus
          stop to where you are going.

          > The bus line I'm on now runs every 10 minutes during the week,
          > 15 minutes on Saturday and 30 minutes on Sunday, which is excellent
          > for Tucson.

          Then there's the question of whether the bus actually goes where I
          want to go :) And how late the buses keep running, and so on.

          Bijan
          --
          Bijan Soleymani <bijan@...>
          http://www.crasseux.com
        • Jym Dyer
          =v= A growing problem is long commutes for the working class and working poor. As the more affluent can afford to either regentrify or move further out into
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 4, 2004
            =v= A growing problem is long commutes for the working class
            and working poor. As the more affluent can afford to either
            regentrify or move further out into newer McMansion sprawl,
            those with less money are pushed into the older suburbs.

            =v= These have decaying infrastructure with massive maintenance
            bills coming due, and of course the residents have to pay lots
            of money to commute in old, failing, polluting cars.
            <_Jym_>
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