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Re: [CF] The intangible costs of car ownership

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  • Robert J. Matter
    ... Last night I was recounting some of the intangible benefits I have realized since becoming carfree. One thing I forgot about is my relief of anxiety about
    Message 1 of 45 , May 12, 2003
      "John O. Andersen" wrote:
      >
      > We've talked about the financial costs of car ownership--which are considerable. But for some people, and certainly in the long run, the intangible costs might be even more onerous.
      >
      > Here a list off the top of my head:
      >
      > 1. Possibly less connection with your immediate neighborhood. Fewer walks to the store? Fewer chats with neighbors? Greater sense of isolation?
      >
      > 2. Lower state of physical fitness. Could automobility contribute to obesity? Could automobility be a factor in hardening of the arteries?
      >
      > 3. Degraded air quality of local area.
      >
      > 4. Noise pollution and traffic congestion.
      >
      > 5. Missing the bonding that occurs on a family bike ride or regular family walks.
      >
      > 6. Too many generic strip malls, and chain stores instead of unique locally owned shops, and markets.
      >
      > What else did I miss?

      Last night I was recounting some of the intangible benefits I have realized since becoming carfree. One thing I forgot about is my relief of anxiety about injuring or killing a pedestrian, cyclist, or someone's pet with a car, even if it was "their fault".

      A few other intangible benefits of carfreedom is greatly reduced risk of death/personal injury from an auto accident, relief of DUI expense anxiety (about $5,000 each occurence I understand), resisting the military/oil/industrial/consumer complex, and feeling good for doing the right thing.

      -Bob Matter
      Riding my bike, not driving a vehicle, in Chicagoland.
      ------------------------------------------------------
      "Motor vehicle crashes represent the largest single
      cause of all injury-related deaths worldwide. Among
      adults ages 15-44 worldwide traffic crashes were the
      leading cause of death for males and the fifth for
      females. Increasing motorization is the leading
      contributor to this increase in motor vehicle crash
      deaths, and can be seen most clearly in developing
      countries where an increasing number of large motor
      vehicles (cars, trucks, buses) share the road with
      pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers of motorcycles
      and motor scooters."
      --David Satcher, MD, PhD, Assistant Secretary for
      Health and Surgeon General of the United States
    • John A. Ardelli
      ... Sounds like she d get along well with my mother... :/ John A. Ardelli http://pedalingprince.blogspot.com http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/vofv/
      Message 45 of 45 , Jan 29, 2008
        On Oct 14, 2007, at 12:39 PM, AnnaLisa Wiley wrote:

        > My sister . . . is one of those people who considers being car-free
        > worse than being homeless . . .

        Sounds like she'd get along well with my mother... :/

        John A. Ardelli
        http://pedalingprince.blogspot.com
        http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/vofv/
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