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Re: How many bikes do you own?

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  • ensignaurora
    ... One. A Huffy Cherokee that I bought 8-9 years back. Use it for home to work, exercise, remote campuses transport, touring. -Traci (....and when the Espos
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 1, 2002
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      --- In CarFree@y..., "greenjeans43606" <slwirz777@s...> wrote:
      >
      > Just out of curiosity (sic?), how many bikes do you use for your
      > transport needs?

      One. A Huffy Cherokee that I bought 8-9 years back. Use it for home to
      work, exercise, remote campuses transport, touring.

      -Traci
      (....and when the Espos were done finding out how much they had done,
      their only regret would be that they could only execute them
      once....(ltte), Book: Hans Solo at Stars End)
    • ensignaurora
      ... Just about. Me, one bike, others around here, a few bikes. Are the others wrong? No for if I were racing, I d probably have one bike dedicated to racing.
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 1, 2002
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        --- In CarFree@y..., John Snyder <JCSnyder.studio@w...> wrote:
        > How's about a sly rhetorical response. How many different
        > pairs of shoes, over shoes, boots, sneakers, socks, waders,
        > flippers, slippers, flip-flops, gollashes, and corn pads
        > do you own, rent or borrow? A bicycle is like any other
        > piece of functional clothing which has been designed to
        > deal with a specific situation.

        Just about. Me, one bike, others around here, a few bikes. Are the
        others wrong? No for if I were racing, I'd probably have one bike
        dedicated to racing. Maybe. Maybe not.

        It's also a matter of cost. Scuba wise, I have just about only one of
        everything. One set of fins (Flipper was a dolphin), one mask, one
        snorkel, one cylinder, etc.. When I finally get around to buying a
        wetsuit, it will be one. Of course, it will be bought with max
        utilization in mind. A two piece where the top can operate alone as a
        shortie.

        But things are also done to fulfill missions. One cylinder but two,
        three dive knives (because if you feet are tangle in fishline, then
        that knife on your calf does you a lot of good!). One rifle, but two
        pistols because the small one doesn't shoot as far as the big one, but
        the big one can't go everyplace that the small one can.

        And then, some things just come down to the pack rat syndrome. I have,
        for example, four computers. I build them, wanted my own little
        network, the ability to have a luggable for a base camp, but the main
        still standing by should I come home on a break. Four computers, but
        only two monitors, one keyboard (use a switch box). Three tv sets.
        Why? Because they were hand me downs and instead of tossing them (to
        whereever), I kept them and put one in each room. As things go
        (crossed fingers), I'm still using the same tv I bought in 1987, still
        using the same dot matrix printer I got in 1988 (and box and monitor
        in some areas of the network).

        And then, some things are bought for the best compromise for
        everything because they are too costly, one way or the other, to have
        more than one of. Ie, the car.

        How many? Depends.....

        -Traci
        (to Beautiful Jennifer, the reciptionist at the clone shop: male
        customner: "Are there more like you at home?"
        "Yes. Eight!"--(wtte), Harris cartoon)
      • De Clarke
        ... three... one MTB for commuting and pleasure riding and light erranding. one Frankenbike (Xtracycle modification) for large (up to say 150 lbs and up to
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 1, 2002
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          > >Just out of curiosity (sic?), how many bikes do you use for your
          > >transport needs?
          > >

          three... one MTB for commuting and pleasure riding and light erranding.
          one Frankenbike (Xtracycle modification) for large (up to say 150 lbs and
          up to about 10 ft long) cargo hauling, grocery shopping. one folding
          bike (Brompton) for air travel to remote spots, and for stowing aboard
          a boat if working at the dock or sailing.

          I see lots of beautiful bikes I'd love to ride (and of course in our
          culture, if you play with it you're supposed to own it!)... but haven't
          room for any more (no garage, small house).

          I don't consider bikes to be my big consumer weakness. nor shoes.
          what I seem to accrete is books and other media. I'm working on it...
          but it's really, really hard to get rid of a book.

          de

          --
          .............................................................................
          :De Clarke, Software Engineer UCO/Lick Observatory, UCSC:
          :Mail: de@... | :
          :Web: www.ucolick.org | Don't Fear the Penguins :
          :1024D/B9C9E76E F892 5F17 8E0A F095 05CD EE8B D169 EDAA B9C9 E76E:
        • Robert J. Matter
          Six. My primary bike is a sport comfort bike with fenders, rack, panniers, and lights I use as an all-around commuter and hilly recreational bike. My secondary
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 1, 2002
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            Six.

            My primary bike is a sport comfort bike with fenders, rack, panniers, and lights I use as an all-around commuter and hilly recreational bike.

            My secondary bike is a recumbent I use mostly for flat recreational riding and occasionally long commutes in nice weather, especially when my ass is sore from riding #1 too much.

            My teriiary bike is an old single speed with baskets I use almost exclusively for grocery shopping and sometimes riding to the train station (<2 miles) in the winter.

            My other three bikes are all old junk ten and three speeds in various states of disrepair that I hope to fashion into one or two working winter train station/commuter bikes. I occasionally loan out one of my train station bikes to people visiting Chicago who want to ride in Critical Mass.

            I know a guy with ten bikes, a guy with fifteen bikes, and a guy with SIXTY bikes. Yes, SIXTY as in 60.

            BTW, see http://www.chicagocriticalmass.org for photos of 700 Chicago Massers liberating I-290, the Eisenhower Expressway on 6/28. "Major Delay's Bike the Ike" we called it, a parody on the recent "Mayor Daley's Ride the Drive" that was an invitational ride that closed off Lake Shore Drive to motor vehicle traffic for four hours on 6/9.

            -Bob Matter
            -----------
            "I am not a liberator. Liberators do not
            exist. The people liberate themselves."
            --Ernesto Che Guevara
          • Michel Gagnon
            ... Hello all, Apart from the fully suspended mountain bike at one extreme and the racy track bike and racing bike at the other extreme, most bikes are fairly
            Message 5 of 20 , Jul 1, 2002
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              greenjeans43606 wrote:
              > ... I've obsessed so much about finding the "perfect" bike ....
              >
              > Just out of curiosity (sic?), how many bikes do you use for your
              > transport needs?
              >


              Hello all,

              Apart from the fully suspended mountain bike at one extreme and the racy
              track bike and racing bike at the other extreme, most bikes are fairly
              versatile, so the best bike is one that suits you and your typical ride.

              So far, I have two bikes and both are touring bikes.

              Why? I like a stable and sturdy bicycle with a fairly relaxed geometry, and
              drop bars that are not too low. For commuting, I don't carry too much stuff,
              but I sometimes do small shopping side trips. For major shopping, I use all
              4 panniers and/or the child trailer. For leasure rides, I need to carry
              extra clothing for me and the 2 children (6 and 2 years old), lunch, repair
              equipment (bike racks on busses don't exist in Montréal), and the ride needs
              to be comfortable but not too slow. I ride almost only on asphalt (no gravel
              within 100 km). As for people who like two different bikes, I realise that I
              try to adjust my bikes so they are as similar to each other as possible. So
              why two?

              1. Bike 1 is a 1980 Vélo Sport Alpin touring bike. It has served me well for
              over 60 000 km, but it has 27" wheels and a no-longer-produced Deore
              crankset with Dynadrive pedals -- great comfortable pedals, by the way.
              These pedals show their age and can't easily be replaced. The low gear (30 F
              / 32 R) isn't low enough for my 43 year-old knees, especially when I tow
              children. Adapting the bike to current needs would have cost more than the
              bike! So now, the bike has become a commuting bike.

              2. Bike 2 is a 2000 Trek 520, with its gearing modified at the store before
              I bought it. Low gear: 22 F / 32 R. It is used for the less noble task of
              "entertainement"

              Regards,


              --

              Michel Gagnon -- mailto:michelgagnon@...
              Montréal (Québec, Canada)
            • purple_bovine
              ... it... ... I know how that feels. My library is quite extensive as well. I think books are the only addiction I have. And I m not even working on it; I m
              Message 6 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                --- In CarFree@y..., De Clarke <de@u...> wrote:

                > I don't consider bikes to be my big consumer weakness. nor shoes.
                > what I seem to accrete is books and other media. I'm working on
                it...
                > but it's really, really hard to get rid of a book.

                I know how that feels. My library is quite extensive as well. I
                think books are the only addiction I have. And I'm not even working
                on it; I'm an unashamed biblioholic and I refuse to reform. The
                world is much more likely to go to hell in a handbasket because
                people do not read than because of excessive book consumption.

                LM
              • bill norman
                For Blue Cow. While books may be you re number one addiction I would nt be surprised if computers and the web came in a close second.
                Message 7 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                  For Blue Cow. While books may be you're number one
                  addiction I would'nt be surprised if computers and the
                  web came in a close second.


                  ______________________________________________________________________
                  Post your ad for free now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
                • bill norman
                  1. Bike 1 is a 1980 Vélo Sport Alpin touring bike. It has served me well for over 60 000 km, but it has 27 wheels and a no-longer-produced Deore
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                    1. Bike 1 is a 1980 V�lo Sport Alpin touring bike. It
                    has served me well for <BR>
                    over 60 000 km, but it has 27" wheels and a
                    no-longer-produced Deore <BR>
                    crankset with Dynadrive pedals -- great comfortable
                    pedals, by the way. <BR>
                    These pedals show their age and can't easily be
                    replaced. The low gear (30 F <BR>
                    / 32 R) isn't low enough for my 43 year-old knees,
                    especially when I tow <BR>
                    children. Adapting the bike to current needs would
                    have cost more than the <BR>
                    bike! So now, the bike has become a commuting
                    bike.<BR>
                    <BR>
                    2. Bike 2 is a 2000 Trek 520, with its gearing
                    modified at the store before <BR>
                    I bought it. Low gear: 22 F / 32 R. It is used for the
                    less noble task of <BR>
                    "entertainement"<BR>
                    </body></html>

                    Car 1 is a four door 1967 Plymouth Fury, 383cc 4
                    barrel with headers and dual exhaust. 3speed auto
                    tranny..... etc,etc,etc.

                    Sound familiar? You must be proud of yourself. Forgive
                    me, I'm not really mocking you but just having a
                    little fun. People are the same everywhere even if
                    some do live in different realities.



                    ______________________________________________________________________
                    Post your ad for free now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
                  • purple_bovine
                    ... Quite possibly. But then again, what I use the web for is mostly talking to people (like the people in this group) - and can we really call human contact
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                      --- In CarFree@y..., bill norman <billnorman1066@y...> wrote:
                      > For Blue Cow. While books may be your number one
                      > addiction I would'nt be surprised if computers and the
                      > web came in a close second.

                      Quite possibly. But then again, what I use the web for is mostly
                      talking to people (like the people in this group) - and can we really
                      call human contact an addiction?

                      LM
                    • De Clarke
                      ... I think this might actually illustrate a point of Larisa s, which is that we can t eradicate certain things from the human psyche [though I wouldn t take
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                        >>
                        >> 1. Bike 1 is a 1980 V�lo Sport Alpin touring bike. It
                        >> has served me well for <BR>
                        >> over 60 000 km, but it has 27" wheels and a
                        >> no-longer-produced Deore <BR>
                        >> crankset with Dynadrive pedals -- great comfortable
                        >> pedals, by the way. <BR>
                        >> These pedals show their age and can't easily be
                        >> replaced. The low gear (30 F <BR>
                        >> / 32 R) isn't low enough f

                        >> Car 1 is a four door 1967 Plymouth Fury, 383cc 4
                        >> barrel with headers and dual exhaust. 3speed auto
                        >> tranny..... etc,etc,etc.
                        >>
                        >> Sound familiar? You must be proud of yourself. Forgive
                        >> me, I'm not really mocking you but just having a
                        >> little fun.

                        I think this might actually illustrate a point of Larisa's,
                        which is that we can't eradicate certain things from the
                        human psyche [though I wouldn't take quite as hopeless a
                        stance as she seems to take about disciplining or ameliorating
                        our less lovable characteristics]; however we might be able
                        to slake our thirst for mechanical gizmos, nifty possessions,
                        pride of ownership etc. by less destructive means.

                        If someone can get the same ego-thrill, i.e. sense of mental
                        accomplishment or show-offery, out of understanding the gear
                        ratios (and heck, why not the metallurgy and tooth shape, spoke
                        resilience, rim x- sections and weight, etc) of their bike, as
                        the motorhead crowd (of which I once was one) get out of arcane
                        technical details of carburetion, camshaft tweakery, etc. --
                        then the overall scene is much less harmful even if the same
                        ego gratification is obtained. obsessive young men (or women)
                        can spend weekends meticulously tweaking their (bike)
                        transmissions without generating 1/100 of the toxic waste
                        products that car-tinkering creates. if someone wants to spend
                        $4000 on an ultralight high-tech super-duper sports bike, only
                        20 lbs of materials are involved (much less mineral wastage
                        than the equivalent $40,000 sports car).

                        ditto if one can derive all the "gadget-itis" thrills that
                        the average SUV driver or multi-computer owner gets today
                        from wasteful products, by instead taking great pride in one's
                        terribly ingenious composting toilet, wind generator, gray
                        water reclamation system, etc.

                        there is an inherent difficulty in that in all human societies
                        a lower value is placed on the humble means of practical
                        survival than on luxury goods. the maker of a good, sturdy,
                        and beautiful wooden salad bowl usually has not enjoyed the
                        same prestige as the maker of a completely useless jewel-
                        studded tiara. thus one wonders whether people will ever
                        really get as excited about a composting toilet (no matter how
                        brilliantly designed) as they would about something totally
                        dysfunctional. but we might be able to get past that if our
                        salad bowls, chairs, toilets, bikes, etc were really well-made,
                        beautiful, and thus satisfying.

                        I would *love* to hear people bragging to each other at social
                        occasions about the terrific efficiency of their new solar
                        system, the number of sq feet of fabric they can dry on their
                        new fancy multi-layer clothesline, etc, rather than about the
                        number of cup holders and motor-driven doors on their new
                        minivan. bragging is bragging and it's never really a lovable
                        thing to do, but if we could start to brag about the niftiness
                        of our efficient, sustainable stuff rather than our trashy,
                        dirty, hyperconsuming stuff that would be some improvement.

                        de

                        .............................................................................
                        :De Clarke, Software Engineer UCO/Lick Observatory, UCSC:
                        :Mail: de@... | :
                        :Web: www.ucolick.org | Don't Fear the Penguins :
                        :1024D/B9C9E76E F892 5F17 8E0A F095 05CD EE8B D169 EDAA B9C9 E76E:
                      • Adrian Croucher
                        3 seems to be a favourite number here. I have an oldish mountainbike with slicks, mudguards, lights, rack, bell and air horn, which I use for most of my
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                          3 seems to be a favourite number here. I have an oldish mountainbike with slicks, mudguards, lights, rack, bell and air horn, which I use for most of my getting around. I also have an even older (c. 1990), but better quality mountainbike that I use for touring. My 3rd bike is a Birdy folding bike which I use for trips with public
                          transport and (yes, I know..) flying to other cities, but is so nice to ride that it actually also goes out on a lot of recreational rides now.

                          It's not a bike, but I have a BoB Yak trailer for shopping and occasional offroad touring.

                          Adrian
                        • purple_bovine
                          ... ... Interestingly, I know two people who do that. Both have solar panels on their roofs, try to conserve energy wherever they can, etc etc etc.
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                            --- In CarFree@y..., De Clarke <de@u...> wrote:

                            > I think this might actually illustrate a point of Larisa's,
                            > which is that we can't eradicate certain things from the
                            > human psyche [though I wouldn't take quite as hopeless a
                            > stance as she seems to take about disciplining or ameliorating
                            > our less lovable characteristics]; however we might be able
                            > to slake our thirst for mechanical gizmos, nifty possessions,
                            > pride of ownership etc. by less destructive means.

                            <snip>

                            > I would *love* to hear people bragging to each other at social
                            > occasions about the terrific efficiency of their new solar
                            > system, the number of sq feet of fabric they can dry on their
                            > new fancy multi-layer clothesline, etc, rather than about the
                            > number of cup holders and motor-driven doors on their new
                            > minivan. bragging is bragging and it's never really a lovable
                            > thing to do, but if we could start to brag about the niftiness
                            > of our efficient, sustainable stuff rather than our trashy,
                            > dirty, hyperconsuming stuff that would be some improvement.

                            Interestingly, I know two people who do that. Both have solar panels
                            on their roofs, try to conserve energy wherever they can, etc etc
                            etc. Both are more than happy to talk about their shiny new energy-
                            efficient gizmos, and brag about biking to work.

                            I think that making sustainability / energy-efficiency "hip" is the
                            only way to ensure that sustainability happens for more than a
                            minuscule percentage of the population. No one will ever eradicate
                            pride of ownership or the desire to brag from the human psyche - nor
                            should they. What should change is the objects that we feel proud to
                            own.

                            Larisa
                          • Michel Gagnon
                            ... Sorry if I sounded too technical. I wanted to explain why I had two fairly similar bikes rather than two very different ones. By the way, one aspect of
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                              Michel Gagnon wrote:
                              > 1. Bike 1 is ....
                              > <BR>
                              > 2. Bike 2 is ....<BR>
                              > </body></html>
                              >
                              bill norman wrote:
                              > Car 1 is a four door 1967 Plymouth Fury, 383cc 4
                              > barrel with headers and dual exhaust. 3speed auto
                              > tranny..... etc,etc,etc.
                              >
                              > Sound familiar? You must be proud of yourself. Forgive
                              > me, I'm not really mocking you but just having a
                              > little fun. People are the same everywhere even if
                              > some do live in different realities.
                              >
                              >
                              >

                              Sorry if I sounded too technical. I wanted to explain why I had two fairly
                              similar bikes rather than two very different ones.
                              By the way, one aspect of cycling I like is that I'm able to do my
                              maintenance and I find it very easy to do. I'm not obsessed by
                              it: I grease or oil usually when it sqeaks (but not for long because I hate
                              the noise), and I do wash bikes every year or two... if I think about it.
                              I'm staying away from recent advances like indexed shifting because I feel
                              these shifters need too much adjustments, especially in Winter.

                              However, I find that knowing the technical data was important when I was
                              shopping around for the new bike, because I know exactly what gears I'm
                              comfortable in and what gears I was wishing for.

                              Regarding bikes, my only obsession is with sales clerks NOT informing people
                              about their options, not looking at their needs, and selling them a
                              double-suspended mountain bike because that's the "in" thing and not because
                              that's what they really need.

                              Regards,

                              --

                              Michel Gagnon -- mailto:michelgagnon@...
                              Montréal (Québec, Canada)
                            • jamesjfitz
                              My bikes in reverse order of getting them: #1) A Wallmart MTB with front suspension from a friends kid who I worked on the bike for and let him borrow one of
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jul 2, 2002
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                                My bikes in reverse order of getting them:

                                #1) A Wallmart MTB with front suspension
                                from a friends kid who I worked on the bike for
                                and let him borrow one of mine when it was broke.
                                He gave it to me because he went into the U.S.A.F.

                                #2) An aluminum Cannondale road bike. Went grocery chopping
                                with the dad of the kid <above> and he said "we are gonna
                                stop at tag sales on the way. I said OK. The sticker on the
                                bike was $10. I gave the guy the money and took it. After we left
                                my friend said "you shuold have offered him $5"!!!

                                >Several rescued bikes in between<

                                #3) A Caldor (just before they went ot of buiseness) MTB
                                Another friend told me when he saw my new dog "you gotta get a MTB to
                                go riding in the woods with your new dog". He was right!
                                Got about $200 total into it, nice Shimono combo brake\shifter levers.

                                #3 has been rode the most because riding on the road sucks here.
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