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Re: [CF] Hills and rim brake overheating danger?

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  • Bill MacLane
    ... I ve ridden in mountains on all kinds of roads & slopes most of my life and never had nor heard of bicycle breaks overheating. ( you are not planning on
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 5, 2009
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      On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 verdant_c <verdantsf@...> wrote:
      >
      > ....I'm now in San Francisco and have to contend with some
      > pretty major hills. I have one hill on the way to work that is a
      > very steep descent for about four blocks.... I have to come to a
      > complete stop at several points. I've read ... that braking
      > continuously on a long hill can overheat the rims


      I've ridden in mountains on all kinds of roads & slopes most of my life and
      never had nor heard of bicycle breaks overheating. ( you are not planning
      on riding with the brakes engaged against the rims constanly ?) About the
      only concern is that brake pads need replaced more often. You'll also find
      the more you ride hills you'll need to adjust your cables more often to keep
      the brakes the way you like them. So unless you are super huge, ride
      extremely fast down very steep slopes with frequent hard stops you should
      have no problems riding and braking normally.

      Regards,
      Bill
    • verdant_c
      Thanks for the help everyone:)! Happy cycling, Tommy
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 6, 2009
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        Thanks for the help everyone:)!

        Happy cycling,
        Tommy

        --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, Jym Dyer <jym@...> wrote:
        >
        > > I'm now in San Francisco and have to contend with some pretty
        > > major hills. I have one hill on the way to work that is a very
        > > steep descent for about four blocks. Because of stop signs and
        > > iffy intersections, I have to come to a complete stop at several
        > > points. I've read on many occasions that braking continuously
        > > on a long hill can overheat the rims, but how long is long?
        >
        > =v= Four blocks shouldn't be a problem, just so long as the rims
        > aren't falling apart anyhow.
        > <_Jym_>
        >
      • Christopher Miller
        I think your Bill s point is pretty solid. I see no problem greater than the rubber (or polymer facsimile thereof, as the case may be) being rubbed off at a
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 7, 2009
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          I think your Bill's point is pretty solid. I see no problem greater than the rubber (or polymer facsimile thereof, as the case may be) being rubbed off at a faster rate.

          But if they DO happen to overheat and actually catch fire, just think how KEEEWWWWLLLL!!! you'll look to the kids on the sidelines!

          On 2009-12-05, at 11:59 AM, Bill MacLane wrote:

          > I've ridden in mountains on all kinds of roads & slopes most of my life and
          > never had nor heard of bicycle breaks overheating. ( you are not planning
          > on riding with the brakes engaged against the rims constanly ?) About the
          > only concern is that brake pads need replaced more often. You'll also find
          > the more you ride hills you'll need to adjust your cables more often to keep
          > the brakes the way you like them. So unless you are super huge, ride
          > extremely fast down very steep slopes with frequent hard stops you should
          > have no problems riding and braking normally.
          >
          >
          >

          Christopher Miller
          Montreal QC Canada



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jym Dyer
          ... =v= The danger with overheating isn t to the brakes themselves; heat is conducted away from the brakes by the metal rim. If the rim gets too hot it could
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 7, 2009
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            > I see no problem greater than the rubber (or polymer facsimile
            > thereof, as the case may be) being rubbed off at a faster rate.
            >
            > But if they DO happen to overheat and actually catch fire,
            > just think how KEEEWWWWLLLL!!! you'll look to the kids on the
            > sidelines!

            =v= The danger with overheating isn't to the brakes themselves;
            heat is conducted away from the brakes by the metal rim. If
            the rim gets too hot it could actually make the innertube burst.
            Sadly, flat tires don't make you look k3wl. Stuffing the spokes
            and baskets with gasoline-soaked newspapers and setting them
            ablaze might look k3wl, but again, this must be weighed against
            the prospect of a flat tire.

            =v= Overheating is more of a concern when you're carrying a lot
            of weight downhill, which is why Xtracycles and touring tandems
            often have hub brakes or disc brakes. Even so, I figure if the
            V-brakes on my folding bike's 20-inch wheels didn't overheat
            going down San Francisco's Twin Peaks while towing a trailer
            with people on it, our friend verdant_c's rims should be able
            to handle four blocks in that city.

            =v= Of course, if he were to bike across the bridge and up to
            Fairfax, then west to Repack Road, that'd be different. ;^)
            <_Jym_>
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