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speed control

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  • Simon Norton
    First of all, let me say that the title of John Ardelli s post is gramatically ambiguous -- and I read it the wrong way at first. I believe that automatic
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 3, 2009
      First of all, let me say that the title of John Ardelli's post is gramatically
      ambiguous -- and I read it the wrong way at first.

      I believe that automatic speed control is already used on some trains.
      Presumably there is little difference as far as technology is concerned between
      applying it on rail and road. The politics is of course different.

      A couple of questions:

      1. Should it be mandatory for all motorists to install such a system ? As a
      compromise, it could be ruled that failure to install such a system could be
      used as evidence against one if accused of speeding; also higher insurance rates
      might apply.

      2. Should there be a manual override ? This might be useful in case of
      emergency, but it would also be useful to a getaway criminal who had stolen
      one's car.

      Simon Norton
    • John A. Ardelli
      ... I noticed that, too, but I didn t write it; my post was a reply to an EARLIER post. I just kept the original writer s subject line so they d recognize it.
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 3, 2009
        On Jun 3, 2009, at 12:05 PM, Simon Norton wrote:

        > First of all, let me say that the title of John Ardelli's post is
        > gramatically ambiguous -- and I read it the wrong way at first.

        I noticed that, too, but I didn't write it; my post was a reply to an
        EARLIER post. I just kept the original writer's subject line so they'd
        recognize it. :)

        > 1. Should it be mandatory for all motorists to install such a system ?

        Ideally, yes. Still:

        > As a compromise, it could be ruled that failure to install such a
        > system could be used as evidence against one if accused of speeding;
        > also higher insurance rates might apply.

        I particularly like the idea about insurance rates. I work in a call
        center in a program that reminds people about their upcoming insurance
        renewals correcting grammar, spelling, punctuation etc. in requests
        sent to the agents. From what I've seen of what the customers ask
        their agents regularly, most people are just ITCHING for DISCOUNTS on
        their premiums; if such a system would be good for a discount that
        would DEFINITELY encourage people to install it. ;)

        > 2. Should there be a manual override ?

        There is.

        John A. Ardelli
        http://pedalingprince.blogspot.com
        http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/vofv/
      • Bart Hawkins Kreps
        ... One option would be to have a manual override that automatically sends a radio message on the police channel. This would allow the police forces to assist
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 15, 2009
          > On Wed, 3 Jun 2009, Simon Norton wrote:
          >
          > > 2. Should there be a manual override ? This might be useful in
          > case of
          > > emergency, but it would also be useful to a getaway criminal who
          > had stolen
          > > one's car.
          >

          On Jun 15, 2009, at 6:48 PM, John Mayson wrote:

          > What emergency would warrant allowing people to operate their
          > vehicle at
          > unsafe speeds? Even emergency vehicles are expected to obey traffic
          > laws.
          > Would someone's four year-old having a high fever be enough to allow
          > them
          > to drive like a bat out of hell?

          One option would be to have a manual override that automatically sends
          a radio message on the police channel. This would allow the police
          forces to assist in dealing with the emergency, but there could also
          be appropriate penalties for misuse, as each act of speeding would be
          clearly tracked.

          Bart Hawkins Kreps
          Port Hope, Ontario




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John A. Ardelli
          ... Only when operating as ordinary vehicles with their beacons/sirens off. Once those beacons and sirens are on, however, they have the right to push their
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 12, 2009
            On 15-Jun-09, at 7:48 PM, John Mayson wrote:
            > Even emergency vehicles are expected to obey traffic laws.
            >

            Only when operating as ordinary vehicles with their beacons/sirens
            off. Once those beacons and sirens are on, however, they have the
            right to "push" their way through traffic, traffic signals and signs
            notwithstanding. Now that doesn't mean they just barrel ahead. What
            it means is, if they come to a red light, stop sign etc., they give
            audible warning with their horns that they're coming and traffic is
            expected to stop to allow them through; once the way is clear, THEN
            they proceed.

            John A. Ardelli
            http://pedalingprince.blogspot.com
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