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disability adaptation

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  • Simon Norton
    There are many able bodied people who are excluded from public transport, because it does not exist in their areas. Many people on this group have complained
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 31, 2007
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      There are many able bodied people who are excluded from public transport,
      because it does not exist in their areas. Many people on this group have
      complained about this. This is mainly in the US but even in the UK public
      transport is not as comprehensive as it should be.

      Take for example the village of Seaton in Rutland. Once I was travelling on a
      bus going through it and the driver showed me a case of a curb that had been
      adapted so that wheelchair users could use it. He also said that this facility
      had never been used.

      He also told me that to cater for disabled people the operator had had to put on
      a bus that was 50% more fuel hungry.

      Earlier this year the route was axed, presumably because the relevant local
      authority was short of money. Everyone who lives in Seaton or wants to visit it
      is therefore now excluded from public transport.

      The only fair way of financing disability facilities (or safety facilities) is
      by a special fund that does not impinge on the viability of the service.

      Simon Norton
    • David Hansen
      ... Indeed. Also accessible transport benefits the able bodied too. One example is ramps and level boarding which is good for those with prams, wheeled cases
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 1, 2007
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        On 31 Jul 2007 at 21:38, Sahar wrote:

        > Accessible transport will benefit many people as most of us can expect
        > to be elderly and disabled to some degree or caring for someone who
        > is.

        Indeed. Also accessible transport benefits the able bodied too. One
        example is ramps and level boarding which is good for those with prams,
        wheeled cases and bikes.

        --
        David Hansen, Edinburgh
        I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents
        me
        http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54
      • Sahar
        A special fund from where? I think all PT should be paid for by Govt. A Govt is meant to be agroup of people running a country *for* its citizens. Therefore
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 1, 2007
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          A special fund from where? I think all PT should be paid for by Govt. A Govt is meant to be agroup of people running a country *for* its citizens. Therefore they want their citizens to be warm and fed and healthy and able to get places. A country isn't a business.
          PT enables people to get places.
          You sound like you're blaming disabled poeple for this lack of bus service. Does that mean you think disabled people should be back in their institutions not costing ablies any money?
          There are enough resources and here's a quote from Micheline Mason 'There are enough resources to support everyone ina comfortable, fulfilled life whether the live in Londonand have spina bifida, or live in Bangladesh and are starving. It is the big illusion of our time that it is resources that we lack. The problem is some poeple control them, mis-use them and deny them to the majority of the rest of the world.'
          We could have a decent wide-spread accessible PT system. This is the 4th richest country on the planet. It is not disabled people with their crazy ideas of inclusion that has reduced your bus service, its the money being spent on other things like invading foreign countries or Prince Andrew costing thousands flying a few miles in a RAF helicopter and many other examples.
          Its not unreasonable for everyone to be able to expect to be able to get on a bus and not be left isolated in their own home.
          50 years ago the media was blaming women wanting to be in the workforce as costing society money and stoping the deserving ones (men( having what they wanted. Then it was people from Asian and the Carribean, then single mothers. Now disabled poeple ate 'too demanding and expensive'
          A civilissed society does not exclude members based on cost. All people should be able to use PT and before walkie-talkkies fret on about disabled people costing them money they need to remember that one day it might be them. And one day they will certainly be old and frail and want a bus they can get on. Us crips pay taxes too and we want them spent on buses we can get on and not MP's perks or weapons to kill people. (and those weapons are currently churning out a whole new host of disabled people)

          S

          Simon Norton <S.Norton@...> wrote:
          There are many able bodied people who are excluded from public transport,
          because it does not exist in their areas. Many people on this group have
          complained about this. This is mainly in the US but even in the UK public
          transport is not as comprehensive as it should be.

          Take for example the village of Seaton in Rutland. Once I was travelling on a
          bus going through it and the driver showed me a case of a curb that had been
          adapted so that wheelchair users could use it. He also said that this facility
          had never been used.

          He also told me that to cater for disabled people the operator had had to put on
          a bus that was 50% more fuel hungry.

          Earlier this year the route was axed, presumably because the relevant local
          authority was short of money. Everyone who lives in Seaton or wants to visit it
          is therefore now excluded from public transport.

          The only fair way of financing disability facilities (or safety facilities) is
          by a special fund that does not impinge on the viability of the service.

          Simon Norton






          The moral test of government is how it treats those who are in the dawn of life . . . the children; those who are in the twilight of life . . . the elderly; and those who are in the shadow of life . . . the sick . . . the needy . . . and the disabled.

          Hubert H. Humphrey

          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! Mail is the world's favourite email. Don't settle for less, sign up for your freeaccount today.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sahar
          I do agree that the whole thing should be made accessible without reducing the service. We have random raised kerbs here in Bristol but hardly any accessible
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 1, 2007
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            I do agree that the whole thing should be made accessible without reducing the service. We have random raised kerbs here in Bristol but hardly any accessible buses. London didn't bother with raised kerbs but just had buses that either lower or have a fold out ramp. Much better idea and doesn't mean digging up roads.
            But when is the 'sensible' idea ever picked?
            Why is London doing it so well but a city like Bristol is crap? Actually, I can answer that. First Bus (motto, First the Worst). All about money and profits and nothitng about customers. Got to watch the regional director blaming customers for poor bus services - apparently the bus has to stop and pick them up (the horror) - and he was a fat man who got chauffer driven into work. You could extend his reasoning of course, if buses never stopped to pick up passengers they'd never get dirty and run to their timetables!
            I went to Southampton the other day where First is just one company among several. And guess what, frequent clean buses that went everywhere. Low floor too. Funny how First can do it there but not in Bristol where they are the sole company.

            And here's some news from the crips and public transport world....

            http://bristol.indymedia.org/newswire.php?story_id=26563

            And possible news on better PT for Bristol (although possibly more commitees using money rather than doing anything...)

            http://www.bristol.indymedia.org/newswire.php?story_id=26650Array&sc=1



            Simon Norton <S.Norton@...> wrote:
            There are many able bodied people who are excluded from public transport,
            because it does not exist in their areas. Many people on this group have
            complained about this. This is mainly in the US but even in the UK public
            transport is not as comprehensive as it should be.

            Take for example the village of Seaton in Rutland. Once I was travelling on a
            bus going through it and the driver showed me a case of a curb that had been
            adapted so that wheelchair users could use it. He also said that this facility
            had never been used.

            He also told me that to cater for disabled people the operator had had to put on
            a bus that was 50% more fuel hungry.

            Earlier this year the route was axed, presumably because the relevant local
            authority was short of money. Everyone who lives in Seaton or wants to visit it
            is therefore now excluded from public transport.

            The only fair way of financing disability facilities (or safety facilities) is
            by a special fund that does not impinge on the viability of the service.

            Simon Norton






            The moral test of government is how it treats those who are in the dawn of life . . . the children; those who are in the twilight of life . . . the elderly; and those who are in the shadow of life . . . the sick . . . the needy . . . and the disabled.

            Hubert H. Humphrey

            ---------------------------------
            Yahoo! Mail is the world's favourite email. Don't settle for less, sign up for your freeaccount today.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Simon Norton
            I m not saying that it s not worth giving disabled people access to public transport, just that putting the burden for financing this solely on able bodied
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 1, 2007
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              I'm not saying that it's not worth giving disabled people access to public
              transport, just that putting the burden for financing this solely on able bodied
              public transport users (or on funding to support the public transport needed
              both by them and by disabled people) is counter productive. There's no point in
              having the most accessible bus service in the world if it's axed due to lack of
              funding.

              Simon Norton
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