Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Sigh ... they still don't get it

Expand Messages
  • whistling_lass
    ... I m curious about that. Do you work, and if so, how far do you walk to work? What s the farthest you ve walked one way? And since I m female, please
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 10, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Lauinger"
      <dub_scratch@...> wrote:
      >
      > That means it does not matter
      > whether you drive a Hummer, or a Prius, or if you ride a bicycle, or
      > if you walk (as I do) as your primary from of transport.

      I'm curious about that. Do you work, and if so, how far do you walk to
      work? What's the farthest you've walked one way? And since I'm
      female, please give the answer both in miles (male brain) and the time
      it took (female brain).

      What other modes of transport do you use, and what is your criteria for
      using them as opposed to walking?

      Marcy
    • Christopher Lauinger
      ... Yes I work and my job is three blocks away ... I don t know. Perhaps 3 miles, or 45 minuets ... That s funny, my male brain measures my travels on foot by
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 11, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "whistling_lass" <bonobo@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Lauinger"
        > <dub_scratch@> wrote:
        > >
        > > That means it does not matter
        > > whether you drive a Hummer, or a Prius, or if you ride a bicycle, or
        > > if you walk (as I do) as your primary from of transport.
        >
        > I'm curious about that. Do you work, and if so, how far do you walk to
        > work?

        Yes I work and my job is three blocks away

        >What's the farthest you've walked one way?

        I don't know. Perhaps 3 miles, or 45 minuets

        > And since I'm
        > female, please give the answer both in miles (male brain) and the time
        > it took (female brain).

        That's funny, my male brain measures my travels on foot by the time while I ignore the
        distance.



        > What other modes of transport do you use, and what is your criteria for
        > using them as opposed to walking?

        I travel primarily by walking-- about 95% of my trips. I do use bike a little but not much. If
        I have to go far or if I have to carry a heavy load then I have a car.

        Some on this board think that makes me not carfree. I disagree because the main
        functions of my life's travels are 100% dependent on my own feet. The very little I do drive
        (last year 500 miles) I could live without if I had to.


        > Marcy
        >
      • ensignaurora
        ... somewhat ... cling ... planet? ... A couple of things. First of all, it s your definition that they are putting their ego and status above the planet. It
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 12, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "whistling_lass" <bonobo@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Gagnepain"
          > <oil_free_and_happy@> wrote:
          > >
          > << Although I'm not ready to do cartwheels in my backyard, I'm
          somewhat
          > encouraged by Brokaw's comments. >>
          >
          > Me. too. I mean, a hybrid is better than an SUV. So many people
          cling
          > stubbornly to their SUV's. It's like how bad can a person's self-
          > esteem be that they're putting their ego and status above the
          planet?
          >
          > Marcy
          >

          A couple of things.

          First of all, it's your definition that they are putting their ego
          and status above the planet. It may not be theirs. Ie, they may be
          driving a small SUV because they figured that was all they needed
          for their life, their requirements, and ego and status had very
          little to do with it. Yet, by the simple fact that it is a SUV, they
          are condemned with those who drive the ones you can hunt elephants
          with. At that point, heaping everyone together, one isn't likely to
          change their mind but rather, steel them against.

          Secondly, let's say I do give up my car, SUV or otherwise. I forego
          all my responsibilities to save the planet, the much greater good. I
          am not able to respond to my mother's needs, I perhaps watch her die
          an early death. The world is not likely to respond to me by enabling
          me to get trained the way I see that my life can make a difference.
          I'm there to help the planet ............ but in return, the planet
          is not there to help me (does Earth really need humans, after all?).
          But I can rest assure that even though my life will probably be much
          bitterly different, my contribution will be helpful to another
          perhaps somewhere else ........... even if that another isn't
          helpful to me in turn.

          Giving up the car is one way (taken as a given) to help the planet
          but from my standpoint, being the best I can be, working my way into
          a position of power in environmental law enforcement, is another.

          Third, keep in mind that the alternate means of transportation
          probably wouldn't be there or wouldn't be as nice if cars weren't
          there. We may like to ride our bikes but would we like to ride them,
          night or day, if there wasn't a smooth roadbed there, if there
          weren't street lights in place? But why build these things if cars
          aren't there? Sure, there are trails but riding along a trail in the
          daylight is one thing ....... it's tempting disaster at night and
          night is when I do most of my riding.

          We still might not get it, in an interpretation, but for a lot of
          us, it is very hard to exist in this world without the car.

          -Traci
          ("I can't do it (give you the Keeper codes), Doctor. I swore an oath
          to keep them safe."--Tremius
          "Well, that's okay, Tremius. In the time to come, when Melkur rules
          as a tyrant, you can rest assure that you kept your oath and honor
          and did not give up the codes that could have stopped him."--The
          Doctor, (w,stte), Dr. Who "The Keeper of Traken")
        • whistling_lass
          ... Man, that s a sweet deal. Although, you can t call off when it s a blizzard and claim you can t get there. :-) ... Well, the classic joke is that a man
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 12, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Lauinger"
            <dub_scratch@...> wrote:

            > Yes I work and my job is three blocks away

            Man, that's a sweet deal. Although, you can't call off when it's a
            blizzard and claim you can't get there. :-)

            > That's funny, my male brain measures my travels on foot by the time
            > while I ignore the
            > distance.

            Well, the classic joke is that a man will give directions thusly: You
            want drive about 3.5 miles and make a left on Rt. 5, go another 5.2
            miles and turn right on 22nd street. And a woman will give
            directions thusly: You want to drive for about 5 minutes and you'll
            see a big church with stained glass windows on the right hand side of
            the road. Make a left there, and then go for about 7 more minutes and
            make a right by the McDonalds.

            Mileage means nothing to me. I convert it to time (if I can).

            Marcy
            Marcy
          • Tom Frost Jr.
            ... [snip] ... they ... TF: Although Ensignaurora is among the more-intelligent members of this list, her writing could use some polishing up sometimes. Above,
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 12, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "ensignaurora" <tappants@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In CarFree@yahoogroups.com, "whistling_lass" <bonobo@> wrote:
              [snip]
              > > It's like how bad can a person's self-
              > > esteem be that they're putting their ego and status above the
              > planet?
              > >
              > > Marcy
              > >
              >
              > A couple of things.
              >
              > First of all, it's your definition that they are putting their ego
              > and status above the planet. It may not be theirs. Ie, they may be
              > driving a small SUV because they figured that was all they needed
              > for their life, their requirements, and ego and status had very
              > little to do with it. Yet, by the simple fact that it is a SUV,
              they
              > are condemned with those who drive the ones you can hunt elephants
              > with. At that point, heaping everyone together, one isn't likely to
              > change their mind but rather, steel them against.


              TF: Although Ensignaurora is among the more-intelligent members of
              this list, her writing could use some polishing up sometimes. Above,
              I'm sure she means that she won't heap _me_ together with all owners
              of vehicles capable of hauling a hind quarter, or more, of an
              elephant, when I tell her that one of my vehicles is capable of
              hauling a _whole_ elephant-carcass but that I selected it for
              purposes other than ego or road-rage-derby survivability (and indeed,
              than hauling elephant carcasses, although that's only because there
              are no elephants around here _to_ hunt).


              [snip]
              > Giving up the car is one way (taken as a given) to help the planet
              > but from my standpoint, being the best I can be, working my way
              into
              > a position of power in environmental law enforcement, is another.


              TF: There are good kinds and bad kinds of "environmental law
              enforcement". Would you care to entertain us with specifics about
              which of those two kinds you do? Please clarify that you're not like
              the Accomac County, Virginia, bureaucrats who once made me dig up a
              whole bunch of piping plover habitat (to the tune of many hundreds of
              percent of what my environmental footprint otherwise was, with my
              16'x16' house that I'd built with rickshawed-up-the-beach materials
              on Cedar Island there), for a stupid drainfield with which to pollute
              the groundwater (instead of _properly_ fertilizing the _top_ of the
              ground as is my usual procedure) with a few turds' worth of
              nitrogen.

              - Tom Frost Jr.
            • Jim Gagnepain
              Having a small roadway or bike path is a far cry for the massive road infrastructure in the US. County roads are built primarily from real estate taxes.
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 12, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Having a small roadway or bike path is a far cry for the massive road
                infrastructure in the US. County roads are built primarily from real
                estate taxes. Neighborhood roads are built primarily from
                Homeowner's Association dues. And State roads and highways are built
                from a combination of gas taxes and General Fund revenue (sales tax).

                My point here is that cyclists pay a lot more taxes to build/repair
                roads, lighting, etc than you might think. And don't let anybody
                tell you different.
                ----
                Jim Gagnepain
                http://home.comcast.net/~oil_free_and_happy/

                > Third, keep in mind that the alternate means of transportation
                > probably wouldn't be there or wouldn't be as nice if cars weren't
                > there. We may like to ride our bikes but would we like to ride
                them,
                > night or day, if there wasn't a smooth roadbed there, if there
                > weren't street lights in place? But why build these things if cars
                > aren't there? Sure, there are trails but riding along a trail in
                the
                > daylight is one thing ....... it's tempting disaster at night and
                > night is when I do most of my riding.
                >
                > We still might not get it, in an interpretation, but for a lot of
                > us, it is very hard to exist in this world without the car.
                >
                > -Traci
                > ("I can't do it (give you the Keeper codes), Doctor. I swore an
                oath
                > to keep them safe."--Tremius
                > "Well, that's okay, Tremius. In the time to come, when Melkur rules
                > as a tyrant, you can rest assure that you kept your oath and honor
                > and did not give up the codes that could have stopped him."--The
                > Doctor, (w,stte), Dr. Who "The Keeper of Traken")
                >
              • Bling Williams
                Just spent 3 weeks camping at various home Education gatherings. English campgrounds are of average size and you re never morethan 400 yards from the toilet
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 13, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Just spent 3 weeks camping at various home Education gatherings. English campgrounds are of average size and you're never morethan 400 yards from the toilet block. Yet people would drive down there. Some people drove at night after drinking. Despite hundreds of children wandering around.
                  What have we come to if we can't stroll a few yards to the toilets?

                  Shyrley


                  War is terrorism with a bigger budget

                  ---------------------------------
                  Sneak preview the all-new Yahoo.com. It's not radically different. Just radically better.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.