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FOR MOST PEOPLE

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  • New10.
    FOR MOST PEOPLE, it is not the truth of their religion parse that people hold onto. It is the feeling of lose, like losing a loved one they don t want to feel.
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 2, 2004
      FOR MOST PEOPLE,
      it is not the truth of their religion parse that people hold onto. It is the feeling of lose,
      like losing a loved one they don't want to feel.
      Giving up their Mormon belief:
      "For Terrie and I the realization was much like experiencing the death of a loved one. It hurt about the same way"
      New10.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • H. E. (Ernie) Schreiber
      ... Funny you should mention that feeling of loss. I do recall my own experience. I was brought up in the Roman Catholic faith. That meant going to church
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 3, 2004
        On Sat, 2 Oct 2004 12:02:21 -0700, "New10." <drnjoseph@...> wrote:

        >FOR MOST PEOPLE,
        > it is not the truth of their religion parse that people hold
        > onto. It is the feeling of loss,
        >like losing a loved one they don't want to feel.
        >Giving up their Mormon belief:
        >"For Terrie and I the realization was much like experiencing the death of
        >a loved one. It hurt about the same way"
        >New10.

        Funny you should mention that "feeling of loss." I do recall my own
        experience. I was brought up in the Roman Catholic faith. That meant
        going to church every Sunday and at all religious holidays, listening to
        endless sermons, being intimidated by having to go to confession, and
        taking "holy communion." I thoroughly disliked that whole situation. When
        I decided to become an atheist, I experienced a deep sense of relief, a
        sense of liberation and finally, I felt a burden being taken off of me.

        I may contrast that with reading a series of books (I was always a
        voracious reader from the moment when I learned how to read). I often
        experienced the "sense of loss" you described when I read a series of books
        that had a common hero, such as a detective or an Indian brave (for example
        Winnetou and Old Shatterhand of Karl Mai's fame), when I came to the end of
        the series and the hero died (or the author, whichever came first).

        I suppose the "sense of loss" applies to the withdrawal from whatever one
        likes to be part of or participate in. Otherwise it is more likely to
        become a sense of relief.


        H. E. (Ernie) Schreiber
        EUNACOM Secular Journal: http://eunacom.net
        Discussion List Server at: <eunacom@yahoogroups.com>
      • Gord Leslie
        I had the same feeling when I left the military after fifteen years. cheers ... From: H. E. (Ernie) Schreiber To: CanadianAtheist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday,
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 3, 2004
          I had the same feeling when I left the military after fifteen years.

          cheers
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: H. E. (Ernie) Schreiber
          To: CanadianAtheist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, October 03, 2004 8:22 AM
          Subject: [CanadianAtheist] FOR MOST PEOPLE


          On Sat, 2 Oct 2004 12:02:21 -0700, "New10." <drnjoseph@...> wrote:

          >FOR MOST PEOPLE,
          > it is not the truth of their religion parse that people hold
          > onto. It is the feeling of loss,
          >like losing a loved one they don't want to feel.
          >Giving up their Mormon belief:
          >"For Terrie and I the realization was much like experiencing the death of
          >a loved one. It hurt about the same way"
          >New10.

          Funny you should mention that "feeling of loss." I do recall my own
          experience. I was brought up in the Roman Catholic faith. That meant
          going to church every Sunday and at all religious holidays, listening to
          endless sermons, being intimidated by having to go to confession, and
          taking "holy communion." I thoroughly disliked that whole situation. When
          I decided to become an atheist, I experienced a deep sense of relief, a
          sense of liberation and finally, I felt a burden being taken off of me.

          I may contrast that with reading a series of books (I was always a
          voracious reader from the moment when I learned how to read). I often
          experienced the "sense of loss" you described when I read a series of books
          that had a common hero, such as a detective or an Indian brave (for example
          Winnetou and Old Shatterhand of Karl Mai's fame), when I came to the end of
          the series and the hero died (or the author, whichever came first).

          I suppose the "sense of loss" applies to the withdrawal from whatever one
          likes to be part of or participate in. Otherwise it is more likely to
          become a sense of relief.


          H. E. (Ernie) Schreiber
          EUNACOM Secular Journal: http://eunacom.net
          Discussion List Server at: <eunacom@yahoogroups.com>



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