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Re: [CalontirDance] Re: Belle Qui

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  • Carol O'Connell
    Rock on, Music Goddess! And I had no idea bout the LOC link. Thanks! That s very handy. So in Katriana s link to the Arbeau page in the LOC, the Superius line
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 9 6:22 AM
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      Rock on, Music Goddess! And I had no idea bout the LOC link. Thanks! That's
      very handy.

      So in Katriana's link to the Arbeau page in the LOC, the Superius line
      starts on a G, just like on all the published pieces. (You determine the "C"
      note by the line that goes through the boxy-looking clef mark at the far
      left. And the C with the vertical line is just the time signature thingy.)

      Thanks, Katriana!

      Conna

      On 2/8/07 6:38 PM, "Katriana" <calonkat@...> wrote:

      > I'm not going to touch the copyright questions, except to point out that
      > anything published before 1923 is free of copyright. If you follow the
      > link I gave in my earlier email (on the camerata list) there is a photo
      > reproduction of Orchesography
      >
      > http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=musdi&fileName=219/musdi219.db&rec
      > Num=61
      >
      > which dates from 1589. The top line is the drum beat and the next four
      > lines are the melody, "alto" tenor and bass. The bar line that goes
      > through the C clef is G (if I remember correctly). I believe you will
      > find that most modern versions use Arbeau as a starting point (which is
      > what I was recommending to you) and then "tweak" the tune if they feel
      > it necessary. Doing your own transcription off the original should be
      > completely free for you to use. The English words I gave you were
      > transcribed (not translated) from the 1948 Mary Stewart Evans
      > translation, republished by Dover.
      >
      > http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/dihtml/dicatlg.html
      > has a list of many dance books available at the Library of Congress
      > online, you might also look at the English Dancing Master by John
      > Playford (well, compiled by John Playford), it is the source of most of
      > the English Country Dances we do in the Society.
      >
      > katriana
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • Carol O'Connell
      ... I thought they all had their little tweaks and stuff. Right? And who knows which came first. Once upon a time, Avatar did tell me that these early
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 9 6:31 AM
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        On 2/8/07 6:56 PM, "Christian M. Cepel" <christian@...> wrote:
        > <Giant snip>
        >
        > Based on what you said above, three people have put their names to
        > Avatar's arrangements. Is that not odd, or is it common?
        >
        I thought they all had their little tweaks and stuff. Right? And who knows
        which came first. Once upon a time, Avatar did tell me that these early
        published pieces contain a lot of musical errors (probably typesetting
        mistakes). Musicologists have all pretty much agreed on the typos, and they
        fix them in modern editions. Maybe this explains why you¹re finding three
        that are identical, but that don¹t quite match the original? They¹ve all
        ³stolen² from Arbeau and fixed the typos?

        I have to confess that this is not my field at all, and I¹m completely
        lacking in the patience to sit and compare each version against the other. I
        just wanna play them! ;) But Katriana knows all about this stuff, thank
        goodness!

        Cheers!
        Conna


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