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RE: [CalontirDance] Reilgious music and dance

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  • Fuller, Neathery
    You know, in my music research I am beginning to suspect that the music development actually worked the other way around. In the beginning, Church music
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 2, 2004
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      You know, in my music research I am beginning to suspect that the music
      development actually worked the other way around. In the beginning, Church
      music started off as very serious, highly scary. ( Really interesting series
      of lectures on Religiosity in the Middle ages at Pennsic, but I digress).
      The illusion I like is the church singing. No variations on the tune, it
      has to be the same. That is why the Christian church had such a push to
      codify the music.. leading to the need to figure out how to record the
      sounds some how. (Written music, if you think about it is just a way to
      help you remember how a tune you already know goes. Be sure to catch my
      discussion of music theory at the October 30 Rush in Rolla- Crass commercial
      announcement)

      Then, as time passes, things lighten up and "popular" music began to work
      its way into the church music. So, I suspect that the Cantigas that we all
      love so much are a reflection of well loved songs that got canonized into
      the a religious form.


      A modern example, (sorry it is the teacher coming out in me!) might be the
      fun drinking song that has now changed into our very serious, National Pride
      inspiring Star Spangled Banner. Do we sing it and immediately want a pint,
      maybe... but I bet the people who sang it when it was first introduced had
      to smile a bit!

      Love Neathery of Safita
    • Tsire Tuzevo
      I agree with both Conna and Seonaid that Christian religious music rarely follows formed or coreographed dancing (in some cases dancing is a banned thing all
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 2, 2004
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        I agree with both Conna and Seonaid that Christian religious music rarely
        follows formed or coreographed dancing (in some cases dancing is a banned
        thing all together, but in most it's just not done to the religious stuff).
        This case is not as true for other religions, *think Hora* but in the
        Christinaity of Rennaisance Europe I'm thinking that dancing, especially
        social dancing, would not have been done to music about the blessed virgin.
        A note on lyrical retread of christian songs:
        There is evidence among the music of the Lutheran Reformation in Germany
        that folk songs, plainchants and basically the popular tunes of the day were
        re-worded with religious text to appeal to the masses. Much like the
        Victorian Ding Dong Merrily becoming a christmas tune, All Green Hills and
        Valleys became All Things That God Graces, and Beautiful Countryside became
        Beautiful Savior, many religious songs are indeed Filks. I suppress laughter
        just thinking of the theme "Lets Filk for Jesus!" So my rambling point is
        that if there is music that we do a dance to that happens to be a familiar
        hymn, look closely at the complosition, arrangement, and lyric dates - the
        text is probably much newer than the tune. Also if the text is as old as the
        music be suspicious that it is appropriate for the social hall - rather than
        for the sanctuary.

        Tsire

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