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RE: [CalontirDance] Re: Bellewode

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  • Sauer, Michael F.
    In a purely along the way sort of self study. I would say that anything that I consider transitional to what are now considered classical forms did not start
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 9, 2011
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      In a purely along the way sort of self study. I would say that anything that I consider transitional to what are now considered classical forms did not start until the 17th cent, at least in a pure dance form.
      It's possible that stage or opera has some of those elements earlier.

      Conrad

      From: CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Albizzi
      Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 9:57 AM
      To: CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [CalontirDance] Re: Bellewode



      I would love to see a class on 16th century transitional dance forms that lead to the classical forms like ballet (like what elements existed at the end of period that pointed dance in that direction) or something like that. But that is just my weird brain working.

      Zino



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Sarah Kaiser
      Look to the baletti for classic forms in thier nascence. Look to the 16th century cascades for the pas de deux performance style gaining provenance and for
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 9, 2011
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        Look to the baletti for classic forms in thier nascence. Look to the 16th century cascades for the pas de deux performance style gaining provenance and for things like fouetté to emerge. Look to the French galliard for some of the jette movements and the Volta for the lifts.
        I could go on, but suffice to say, you can certainly find examples in period that beget many of our modern forms of dance.

        Tzippi

        On Feb 9, 2011, at 10:13 AM, "Sauer, Michael F." <sauerm@...> wrote:

        > In a purely along the way sort of self study. I would say that anything that I consider transitional to what are now considered classical forms did not start until the 17th cent, at least in a pure dance form.
        > It's possible that stage or opera has some of those elements earlier.
        >
        > Conrad
        >
        > From: CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Albizzi
        > Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 9:57 AM
        > To: CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [CalontirDance] Re: Bellewode
        >
        > I would love to see a class on 16th century transitional dance forms that lead to the classical forms like ballet (like what elements existed at the end of period that pointed dance in that direction) or something like that. But that is just my weird brain working.
        >
        > Zino
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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