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Re: [CalontirDance] Re: Kasha--sightreading pattern & xelephone

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  • Ailsa Goldenbraid
    Jayne, My madrigal group used a simple recorder. You can get a good one for only $5 from Yamaha or Tudor. It is also good if someone needs to hear a part
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 30, 2009
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      Jayne,

      My madrigal group used a simple recorder. You can get a good one for only $5 from Yamaha or Tudor. It is also good if someone needs to hear a part before singing because it is portable. However, pitch pipes are good too, I always carried mine as a backup in case the recorder player didn't show. Oh, and this was a time before I could play the recorder myself if this confuses anyone.

      ~Ailsa~


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: psy_sarah
      To: CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 4:01 PM
      Subject: [CalontirDance] Re: Kasha--sightreading pattern & xelephone





      Jayne, As a vocal education major, my answer to the problem you are mentioning is a pitch pipe. They are relatively inexpensive and portable (fit in your pocket) and i personally wouldn't go anywhere without one.
      My two cents,
      Arina
      --- In CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com, "Krege, Barbara B" <krege@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear Kasha, I didn't see Christian's original email regarding sightreading. But I attended the 1st, 4th & 5th of your sightreading classes at Lilies.
      >
      > What was the pattern that you had the class sing to help people be more familiar with the notes? -- it started 1 3 5 .....
      >
      > Wasn't the "1" note the note that the song started with?
      >
      > Also a question for you, Christian and other singers--I am looking for a simple, inexpensive musical instrument to use to help with singing at the park to play the starting notes of a song with--I was thinking of a xelephone (sp?) and was wondering if I could find one that would be fairly inexpensive, but that would be reliable (ie, that would keep the correct tone over time.)
      >
      > I am 63 years old and learning an instrument that requires that I blow correctly into it to get the right tone is out.
      >
      > Jayne
      > Outlands
      >
      > ________________________________
      >
      > From: CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com on behalf of pitykelfin pitykelfin@...
      > Sent: Tue 6/30/2009 12:22 PM
      > To: CalontirDance@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [CalontirDance] Re: An open letter to Her Ladyship Kasha...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi, sightsingers!
      >
      > Christian, your question is a really good one.
      >
      > There are no rules for learning sightsinging, so you should use whatever system seems to work for you. I think that the easiest way to do things, however, is to use "1" for the tonic note, no matter what key you are in. In a minor key, that will mean that "3" is lower than it is in a major key. (It might mean even weirder changes, if the song is in, for example, Dorian or Phrygian mode.) If you keep the tonic as "1", though, you remind yourself and your ear of which note is the most important in the piece. You also avoid singing lots of "6"s and "2"s and other odd numbers.
      >
      > I hope that is helpful.
      >
      > Sincerely,
      > Kasha
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • pitykelfin
      Dear Jayne, The pattern that I prefer to use for getting the key in your head is to sing 1-3-5-1(high)-5-3-1-5(low)-1-7(low)-1. Adding the 7 and the lower 5
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Dear Jayne,

        The pattern that I prefer to use for "getting the key in your head" is to sing 1-3-5-1(high)-5-3-1-5(low)-1-7(low)-1. Adding the 7 and the lower 5 helps, but just 1-3-5-3-1 should do fine if you want simplicity.

        "1" is *usually* the note the song starts on, but not every single time. To find "1", look at the beginning and ending notes of the piece, and try to find notes that are emphasized a lot. "1" will always sound like it has the least tension--all the other notes in the piece will feel like they should lead to "1". You can also get an idea from the key signature, although this can be deceptive, especially in medieval music.

        Let me know if any of this doesn't make sense... :D

        --Kasha
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