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Calontir Choir

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  • Christopher Mortika
    ... Yep, The heavens willing and the creek don t rise, yes. First some background: Last year, Kasha and I set up a Calontir Choir and ran rehearsals at
    Message 1 of 2 , May 8 3:35 AM
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      > Posted by: "ChazCon" ironrat@... valdemar03
      > Wed May 7, 2008 9:56 pm (PDT)
      > Hey Christian...
      > At Bellewode you mentioned that you were organizing a singing group at
      > Lilies.
      > Is that still happening?
      >
      > What's the news?
      >
      > Love, Constantia

      Yep, The heavens willing and the creek don't rise, yes.

      First some background:
      Last year, Kasha and I set up a "Calontir Choir" and ran rehearsals at
      events, including Lilies, with a goal to perform at last summer's
      Kingdom A&S. The rehearsals went pretty well, when we had people
      come. And then, at Kingdom A&S, not enough choir members attended to
      field a team.

      Last year, there were reasons we thought it would be rude to try to
      perform at Lilies. Those reasons don't apply this year, and it is
      *far* easier to assemble a choir there. So that's the plan.

      The following list is 95% set. Most of it's from last year.

      [ something upbeat ] Cantate, Domino (Hassler)
      [ something different ] Il est Bel et Bon (Passereau)
      [ something cool ] El Grillo (Des Prez)
      [ male voices ] Iia Kasha's motet
      [ female voices ] Ecco la Primavera (Landini)
      [ the Big Deal ] A Round of Three Country Dances (Ravenscroft)
      [ something fairly familiar ] Doe You not Know? (Morley)
      [ something people can learn day-of ] Martin Said to His Man (Ravenscroft)
      [ rousing closer ] Non Nobis Domine (the modern one)

      None of this is secret. Pass it all along.

      Now there's a problem, and I'm wondering if anybody can help.

      Years ago, I found out that a choir like this works best if people can
      hear their parts when practicing.
      When I directed the Northshield Choir, I had software that could
      produce stand-alone MIDI files (and someone else could turn those into
      WAV files that could be played on a normal CD player, instead of a
      computer.)

      I currently use a Macintosh, OS 10.2, and I'm having difficulty
      finding software that can make stand-alone MIDI files. (My
      stripped-down version of Finale can make files that MIDI equipment,
      like keyboards, can play, but that's not as helpful!)

      So: does anybody have any recommendations for software I could use?
      (Noteworthy Composer is ridiculously cheap, good for this kind of
      thing,... and only works on PC's.) Barring that, would anybody with a
      PC be willing to help with the grunt-work of typing in the music?

      --Christian
    • Katriana
      On Thu, May 8, 2008 at 5:35 AM, Christopher Mortika wrote: [clip] ... According to Finale, all of their software (except Notepad) can
      Message 2 of 2 , May 8 6:27 AM
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        On Thu, May 8, 2008 at 5:35 AM, Christopher Mortika <c.mortika@...> wrote:
        [clip]
        > Years ago, I found out that a choir like this works best if people can
        > hear their parts when practicing.
        > When I directed the Northshield Choir, I had software that could
        > produce stand-alone MIDI files (and someone else could turn those into
        > WAV files that could be played on a normal CD player, instead of a
        > computer.)
        >
        > I currently use a Macintosh, OS 10.2, and I'm having difficulty
        > finding software that can make stand-alone MIDI files. (My
        > stripped-down version of Finale can make files that MIDI equipment,
        > like keyboards, can play, but that's not as helpful!)

        According to Finale, all of their software (except Notepad) can save
        audio files as MP3. That is a great format for the web, and most cd
        burning software can convert them to audio CD files. The biggest
        advantages of MIDI files are that they are incredibly small (because
        they're not music, just code) and can be converted by a lot of
        notation programs. But MP3 files should work just fine.

        katriana
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