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RE: [Cadillac_Performance_Association] Lotus 7 Replicar

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  • Rex Judicata
    Posted by: Jonathan Cook jwjcook@hotmail.com I am in the process of building a Locost kitcar Lotus 7 replica. I really want something that is hopelessly
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 7, 2008
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      Posted by: "Jonathan Cook" jwjcook@...

      I am in the process of building a Locost kitcar Lotus 7 replica. I
      really want something that is hopelessly overpowered and scary as hell
      "! That is why I am interested in a Caddy 472-500 engine swap. Now
      obviously I would like to keep the weight to a minimum, so I am curious
      to know what a 472-500 would weigh with aluminum goodies. Also what
      manual transmission can handle the gobs of torque a caddy can put out? I
      basically want to bring exotic high "$$" sportscar owners back to
      reality!! A very very poor man's Bugatti Veyron!!


      Jonathan, I can think of a number of better alternatives than anything
      with a cast iron block, regardless of displacement. A pity it's not an
      Allard kit - the Cadillac would seem symbolically appropriate there -
      but a Lotus 7 clone? The kits I've seen had wimpy frames - real
      flexi-flyers. I would go for whatever 'appropriate' engine is lightest.
      I hope you'll post details and photos of the completed project.
    • cody_g_carson
      The Caddy 472/500 with aluminum intake is only 35 pounds heavier than a 350 Chevy. With Aluminum heads you would be lighter than the SBC. The iron-head Caddy
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 20, 2009
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        The Caddy 472/500 with aluminum intake is only 35 pounds heavier than a 350 Chevy. With Aluminum heads you would be lighter than the SBC. The iron-head Caddy with Aluminum intake is in the 600 lb. range ( I can't remember the exact weight) but it is 85 Pounds lighter than the 454.

        The Northstar, by contrast weighs 350 Pounds – so I am told. Head studs can put in the Northstar to prevent the heads from lifting which causes the head gasket failure.

        Both engines can be built up to over 1,000 hoursepower.

        500 cubic inch crate engines are available in the 500 – 900 horsepower range.

        The Norhstar will cost a lot more to build and it will require higher revs to get the power.

        If your kit car can handle the weight of a small block Chevy, either engine is a good choice - If – and that is IF the car's body would hold the Caddy 500. If the frame has structural issues, I'd lean toward the Nortstar. If it can be reinforced, then you can't beat the neck snapping torque of the 500. Be sure to build it with a cage and make sure the seats have strong enough tracks. You don't want to hit the gas, hear a pop, then wind up in the trunk.


        --- In Cadillac_Performance_Association@yahoogroups.com, "Rex Judicata" <rexjudicata@...> wrote:
        >
        > Posted by: "Jonathan Cook" jwjcook@...
        >
        > I am in the process of building a Locost kitcar Lotus 7 replica. I
        > really want something that is hopelessly overpowered and scary as hell
        > "! That is why I am interested in a Caddy 472-500 engine swap. Now
        > obviously I would like to keep the weight to a minimum, so I am curious
        > to know what a 472-500 would weigh with aluminum goodies. Also what
        > manual transmission can handle the gobs of torque a caddy can put out? I
        > basically want to bring exotic high "$$" sportscar owners back to
        > reality!! A very very poor man's Bugatti Veyron!!
        >
        >
        > Jonathan, I can think of a number of better alternatives than anything
        > with a cast iron block, regardless of displacement. A pity it's not an
        > Allard kit - the Cadillac would seem symbolically appropriate there -
        > but a Lotus 7 clone? The kits I've seen had wimpy frames - real
        > flexi-flyers. I would go for whatever 'appropriate' engine is lightest.
        > I hope you'll post details and photos of the completed project.
        >
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