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call for issue on imprisonment: qarrtsiluni

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  • crwropps@aol.com
    Contributions of nonfiction, poetry, short fiction, photographs, digitized artwork, short films, original musical compositions, spoken word recordings, and
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 4, 2011
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      Contributions of nonfiction, poetry, short fiction, photographs,
      digitized artwork, short films, original musical compositions, spoken
      word recordings, and collaborative works are sought for an
      imprisonment-themed issue of qarrtsiluni, edited by Ken Lamberton and
      Ann E. Michael.

      http://qarrtsiluni.com

      THEME DESCRIPTION

      Is a prisoner simply in the lock-up, or locked up in a multitude of
      ways? Penned, caged, in the slammer, shut off, closed down, barred and
      gated, captive, detained, committed, incarcerated, in custody,
      kidnapped, impounded, seized, snagged, pinched, restrained, jailed…
      English offers hundreds of ways to name kinds of imprisonment —
      physical, emotional, intellectual, metaphorical — perhaps because
      something very basic within us rebels against containment, even when
      it has its benefits. Like the seedling tree that pushes through
      cliffside rock to reach sunlight, barriers are things we instinctively
      push against and try to overcome. Perhaps we are all prisoners.

      What are the objects, desires, laws, thoughts, that imprison us? Why
      do we withhold ourselves; what holds us back? Must punishment be
      linked to constraints; and where are our prisons of the mind, heart,
      and place? Might there even be times when imprisonment is welcomed?
      The editors ask writers and artists to engage in an exploration of the
      idea and the physical experience of containment and to send work to us
      that surprises and expands the notion of what it means to be a
      prisoner.

      FURTHER DETAILS

      The deadline for submissions is April 30. All submissions should go
      through our submissions manager. People without easy access to the
      internet, such as prisoners, may get someone else to submit on their
      behalf. For this issue, we may be able to accommodate postal
      submissions from prisoners as well, but please query first.

      The size limits per submission this time are 3 poems, 4 images, 2
      prose pieces at 1000 words maximum each, or any combination thereof.
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