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call for submissions: Hayden's Ferry Review

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  • crwropps@aol.com
    Call for Submissions - The Grotesque: Hayden s Ferry Review is looking for prose, poetry, and visual art that explore the humanity, beauty, and reality of the
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 7, 2007
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      Call for Submissions - The Grotesque: Hayden's Ferry Review is looking for
      prose, poetry, and visual art that explore the humanity, beauty, and reality
      of the literary grotesque - the monstrous, the unusual, the abnormal. Please
      send to: Hayden's Ferry Review (SS42), Virginia G. Piper Center For Creative
      Writing, Box 875002, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5002.
      Postmark deadline: January 15, 2008.


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    • crwropps@aol.com
      To celebrate HFR s 25th anniversary, we ve got a special theme in the works. We d like to receive work--fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, translations,
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 3, 2011
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        To celebrate HFR's 25th anniversary, we've got a special theme in the works.
        We'd like to receive work--fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, translations,
        art, mixed-media--that addresses the theme of "artifacts," as described
        (somewhat vaguely, on purpose!) here.

        Art is, by its nature, a record. Literature, photographs, paintings, music: all
        these seek to catalogue the world just as they seek to elevate and transform it.
        A piece of art is also then, by its nature, an artifact: an object with unique
        meaning both within its context and apart from it. For HFR's 50th issue, we're
        interested in investigating how fragments and relics from our history help to
        shape our current state of being. What happens when you wrest an object from its
        homeland (in time, place, state of mind)? Why do we trust remnants of the past
        as distinctively truthful, and how do we inevitably misunderstand them? Send us
        writing and art that engages with the theme of "artifact" in whatever way you
        see fit. Consider the fact that writing itself - the writing, for instance, in
        HFR's 49 past issues - becomes a slightly different object upon publication and
        perusal. Consider that work banned in one country develops a new set of meaning
        in other places. Consider how artifacts shape the identities of people, nations,
        cultures. Consider the lives of fraudulent artifacts, objects that create
        invented histories and narratives. And hey, consider something that we haven't.
        Tell us all about ourselves: we trust you.

        To submit, go to our Submishmash page <http://hfr.submishmash.com> . Choose the
        genre you're submitting under, and mention that you're submitting in response to
        our "artifact" call in the comments section. We look forward to reading your
        work!







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