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Can a guy with an average brain use the CNC Tookit effectively?

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  • mmeyers1111
    Ham radio hobbyists are out there... 3 axis cnc guys are out there... But you guys are REALLY OUT THERE! Questions for you CNC 5 & 6 axis gurus... I m trying
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 2 2:05 PM
      Ham radio hobbyists are out there...
      3 axis cnc guys are out there...
      But you guys are REALLY OUT THERE!

      Questions for you CNC 5 & 6 axis gurus...

      I'm trying to purchase 3D modeling software so my son can do a
      science project for school. It would be nice to take the 3D thing
      he wants to model and expand the project scope... He wants to model
      an electric guitar and since I'm already building a violin with my
      daughter, I'd decided to build cnc router (a 3 axis unit is already
      underway) to mill some guitar parts and a violin neck (including
      the volute/scrollÂ… you know the curly thingies up by the tuning
      pegs).

      Therefore, I'm going to do one of 2 things in my attempt to model
      and mill a violin neck ...

      1) Purchase Rhino for 3D CAD, DeskProto for 3D 4 axis CAM, and Mach2
      for control of the cnc router I'm going to build, (yes I know I can
      go no farther than a 4 axes with DeskProto) or...

      2) I'm going to go with 3DMAX (or GMAX) with Rab's CNC Toolkit and
      Mach2.

      So here are the real questions...

      a) Is number 2 even doable for mere mortals like me, or does one
      need to be a god like Rab or you guys to be successful?

      b) Would I be better off to start with #1 and then keep #2 as a long
      term goal?

      c) Does the CNC Toolkit do most of the CAM things that can be done
      with software like DeskProto, VectorCAM, VisualMill, etc., and is
      the CNC Toolkit as easy to use? Obviously, I know the CNC Toolkit
      is not limited to 4 axes and the cost is low :-) !!!

      d) Is using GMAX viable, or a waste of time and I should plan on the
      big bucks for 3D MAX?

      When I think about milling a violin neck, even using a rotary 4th
      axis will leave significant amounts of carving to be done by hand.
      I imagine that even 5 axis routing won't quite do everything, but
      when I saw Rab explain his rotary 6th axis I thought... wow, that
      would just about do it all with a few end mill changes along the way.

      So I know I'm nuts to even be asking you guys these questions, and
      I'm asking a lot, but what the heck, I'm a tough guy... I can take
      the jokes, heckling and sarcasm. Wadaya think... should I go with
      strategy #1 or #2 ???

      Mike
    • rainnea
      Hi Mike, I can t give you very impartial advise on this, hopefully some other users can comment given their experiences. If you re willing to have a go at
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 4 10:13 AM
        Hi Mike,

        I can't give you very impartial advise on this, hopefully some other
        users can comment given their experiences.
        If you're willing to have a go at building a 3-axis router anyway
        then the extra time, effort and expense in making it 5-axis capable
        is well worth it and would enable you to make do violin and guitar
        necks. Remember that it wasn't that long ago that a 4th axis was
        considered a big deal but is now becoming quite commonplace.
        As for the CNC Toolkit, I understand that people aren't finding it
        along with Max / GMax very easy to use at first and what seems quite
        straightforward to me after using this software for years may seem
        quite obscure to first time users, but I set up this forum to help
        people like yourself use this software combination. I'd suggest that
        you give it a go with GMax and just ask when you get stuck, it is a
        very powerful and flexible combination once you get the basic
        concepts. If you do reach a brick wall that you can't progress past
        then at that stage you could consider spending some money on one of
        the commercial packages, but at that stage you may have a better idea
        of what you really need a CAM program to do.

        Regards,

        Rab


        --- In CNC_Toolkit@yahoogroups.com, "mmeyers1111" <mmeyers1111@y...>
        wrote:
        > Ham radio hobbyists are out there...
        > 3 axis cnc guys are out there...
        > But you guys are REALLY OUT THERE!
        >
        > Questions for you CNC 5 & 6 axis gurus...
        >
        > I'm trying to purchase 3D modeling software so my son can do a
        > science project for school. It would be nice to take the 3D thing
        > he wants to model and expand the project scope... He wants to
        model
        > an electric guitar and since I'm already building a violin with my
        > daughter, I'd decided to build cnc router (a 3 axis unit is already
        > underway) to mill some guitar parts and a violin neck (including
        > the volute/scrollÂ… you know the curly thingies up by the tuning
        > pegs).
        >
        > Therefore, I'm going to do one of 2 things in my attempt to model
        > and mill a violin neck ...
        >
        > 1) Purchase Rhino for 3D CAD, DeskProto for 3D 4 axis CAM, and
        Mach2
        > for control of the cnc router I'm going to build, (yes I know I can
        > go no farther than a 4 axes with DeskProto) or...
        >
        > 2) I'm going to go with 3DMAX (or GMAX) with Rab's CNC Toolkit and
        > Mach2.
        >
        > So here are the real questions...
        >
        > a) Is number 2 even doable for mere mortals like me, or does one
        > need to be a god like Rab or you guys to be successful?
        >
        > b) Would I be better off to start with #1 and then keep #2 as a
        long
        > term goal?
        >
        > c) Does the CNC Toolkit do most of the CAM things that can be done
        > with software like DeskProto, VectorCAM, VisualMill, etc., and is
        > the CNC Toolkit as easy to use? Obviously, I know the CNC Toolkit
        > is not limited to 4 axes and the cost is low :-) !!!
        >
        > d) Is using GMAX viable, or a waste of time and I should plan on
        the
        > big bucks for 3D MAX?
        >
        > When I think about milling a violin neck, even using a rotary 4th
        > axis will leave significant amounts of carving to be done by hand.
        > I imagine that even 5 axis routing won't quite do everything, but
        > when I saw Rab explain his rotary 6th axis I thought... wow, that
        > would just about do it all with a few end mill changes along the
        way.
        >
        > So I know I'm nuts to even be asking you guys these questions, and
        > I'm asking a lot, but what the heck, I'm a tough guy... I can take
        > the jokes, heckling and sarcasm. Wadaya think... should I go with
        > strategy #1 or #2 ???
        >
        > Mike
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