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Re:what do you think of MSR - Lightning Ascent snowshoes?

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  • michael Palmer
    I retired my my 1974 vintage, 46 , rawhide and ash, Vermont Tubbs this year after negotiating a couple of miles of crusty downhill (not enough grip).  In my
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 25, 2009
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      I retired my my 1974 vintage, 46", rawhide and ash, Vermont Tubbs this year after negotiating a couple of miles of crusty downhill (not enough grip).  In my research the Lightning Ascents are the best for all terrain.  You won't be able to scoot in them because of the teeth, so for open terrain or frozen lakes they will be slower than smoother designs. In all they are light and well designed.  See if you can get 35 years out of them too. --mike

    • Isabelle Peyrichoux
      Thanks Michael for your email. I actually ended up getting the Women Lightning Ascent. They were on sales at REI (30%) and I couldn t resist! :-) I hope I ll
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 25, 2009
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        Thanks Michael for your email. I actually ended up getting the Women Lightning Ascent. They were on sales at REI (30%) and I couldn't resist! :-)
        I hope I'll get 35 years out of them too!! They have a lifetime warranty if anything happens before then...
        BTW: if anybody is looking for snowshoes, some REI stores might still have some pairs on sale (30%). By calling the 1-800 number, you can know which store has what.
         
        Isabelle


        From: michael Palmer <mp5of8@...>
        To: CMG@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:30:33 AM
        Subject: CMG: Re:what do you think of MSR - Lightning Ascent snowshoes?

        I retired my my 1974 vintage, 46", rawhide and ash, Vermont Tubbs this year after negotiating a couple of miles of crusty downhill (not enough grip).  In my research the Lightning Ascents are the best for all terrain.  You won't be able to scoot in them because of the teeth, so for open terrain or frozen lakes they will be slower than smoother designs. In all they are light and well designed.  See if you can get 35 years out of them too. --mike


      • Marcus Libkind
        One person thought that the MSR Lightening Ascents didn t have enough flotation. They come in different lengths (22 , 25 and 30 ). I doubt that anyone would
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 25, 2009
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          One person thought that the MSR Lightening Ascents didn't have enough
          flotation. They come in different lengths (22", 25" and 30"). I doubt
          that anyone would want snowshoes greater than 30".

          My first pair of snowshoes were 30" long and I found them too long
          for Sierra conditions (we tend not to have powder that lasts very
          long due to warmer temps than in CO and elsewhere). I used my 25"
          Ascents during the peak of the recent storms on a lake. There was at
          least 3 feet of powder on the lake and nearly all of it was very
          light due to the cold temperatures. In those conditions, with a light
          pack, I sank in less than 12 inches (I weigh 160 lbs).

          Yes, with a heavy pack it would have been deeper, but I would not
          purchase snowshoes for the extreme conditions. In all liklihood if
          the conditions are like they were on my lake trip you would not be
          doing much steep climbing because of the avalanche conditions and the
          slow going even with 30" snowshoes would limit where you would go.

          Bottom line, don't purchase too long of snowshoes. If you really want
          versatility, the MSR Evo Ascents are 22" and you can add an
          additional 6" extension (more $$$).

          Regardless of the length, I agree with the person that said ease of
          the binding is important. I am impressed with the MSR system, though
          I have some ideas on improvements ... (1) shorten the straps so you
          don't have the long end that tends to be caught when going through
          powder snow and (2) turn over the "strap clips" so the strap end
          enters from below because it will reduce the times that they come
          loose and flap (I haven't tried this yet).

          Good luck.

          Marcus

          --- In CMG@yahoogroups.com, Isabelle Peyrichoux
          <isabelle_peyrichoux@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks Michael for your email. I actually ended up getting the
          Women Lightning Ascent. They were on sales at REI (30%) and I
          couldn't resist! :-)
          > I hope I'll get 35 years out of them too!! They have a lifetime
          warranty if anything happens before then...
          > BTW: if anybody is looking for snowshoes, some REI stores might
          still have some pairs on sale (30%). By calling the 1-800 number, you
          can know which store has what.
          >
          > Isabelle
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: michael Palmer <mp5of8@...>
          > To: CMG@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:30:33 AM
          > Subject: CMG: Re:what do you think of MSR - Lightning Ascent
          snowshoes?
          >
          >
          > I retired my my 1974 vintage, 46", rawhide and ash, Vermont Tubbs
          this year after negotiating a couple of miles of crusty downhill (not
          enough grip).  In my research the Lightning Ascents are the best for
          all terrain.  You won't be able to scoot in them because of the
          teeth, so for open terrain or frozen lakes they will be slower than
          smoother designs. In all they are light and well designed.  See if
          you can get 35 years out of them too. --mike
          >
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