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Re: CI in Repair Industry: AKA We're Different, Lean won't work here!

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  • Fredd Grabber
    Jim thanks for the great thoughts. Repair as identified to me in this specific context is the only value added portion. Our customer send us broken stuff and
    Message 1 of 6 , May 24 5:51 AM
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      Jim thanks for the great thoughts.

      Repair as identified to me in this specific context is
      the only value added portion. Our customer send us
      broken stuff and we repair it, ie we do not have a
      true production line that produces our product, our
      'product' is a customer repaired item. There are
      hundreds of versions and iterations that we recieve.
      Rework is another story...Previously we have taken the
      inspect to improve approach. We are trying to tackle
      that mentality as well. My opinion, is that our
      repair process does have some unique challenges, I
      have seen to much evidence to say lean cannot improve
      our processes.

      Your exactly correct, for the most part, our structure
      has remained the same. There has been some movement
      toward implementing type of perf-appraisal system to
      encourage movement towards lean thinking. Maybe that
      is the key, the perf-appraisal system. Are there
      examples of the key concepts to a successfull system?
      Any good resources on this?

      I appreciate all your thought-provoking comments.

      Fred


      --- Jim McKechnie <mckechnie@...> wrote:
      > Hi Fred,
      >
      > The fact that you say 90% repair and only 10% real
      > production raises the
      > question: How do you define "repair?" Is this
      > rework? Now, if you were say
      > that 90% of there time and efforts are spent on
      > "non-value added" activities
      > and 10% on "value added," then I'd say you're pretty
      > much typical of most
      > manufacturing operations. In your subject line, you
      > suggest you are in the
      > "repair industry." Does this mean that your
      > industry might be different
      > from all the rest, and maybe there is some
      > justification for the issues at
      > hand? Some people will jump right in and try to
      > address your "problems" by
      > listening to your "symptoms" but without the
      > critical information, the
      > answers you will receive could very well lead you to
      > the wrong actions.
      >
      > Let's try to get a little more focused on your
      > questions. On your first
      > question, keep in mind there are libraries full of
      > books on your issue. The
      > first thing I might ask is who is leading the
      > change? When you say you're
      > having a "hard time getting buy-in," it may suggest
      > that the communication
      > of the change is inappropriate. For example, have
      > the middle managers been
      > given an "adult to adult" direction from senior
      > management as to their
      > expectations? And, have these same managers been
      > notified their performance
      > appraisals now are weighted by their proactivity and
      > accomplishments
      > directly related to the transformation? If the
      > answers to these questions
      > are "No!" then I think I have an idea why there is a
      > "buy in" symptom.
      >
      > Go out and buy the book "Leading Change" by John P.
      > Kotter and read it. As
      > a matter of fact, have the entire management team
      > read it an make them
      > identify specific metrics to validate they are
      > really leading the change
      > (once these metrics are established, put them in the
      > appraisals and periodic
      > reviews). Right after you finish that book, buy and
      > read "The Toyota Way"
      > by Jeffrey Liker. Both of these books are most
      > inciteful in their
      > depictions of what you need to do and why.
      >
      > There may also be a lack of vision for the
      > organization. Does everyone
      > truly understand how critical it is to change
      > internally? Has the
      > organization structure been left in tact from before
      > the change in direction
      > (most people will say, "Well sure! Why would we
      > change it?" Keep in mind,
      > the organization structure you currently have in
      > place was designed to give
      > you the results you have been getting - NOT REALLY
      > GOOD! What you need to
      > do is get your value streams identified and
      > streamlined, then realign your
      > people to meet the value stream needs. You see, the
      > processes should not be
      > subservient to the organization structure - it has
      > to be the other way
      > around. This is scary, isn't it? Guess what! Your
      > organization is not in
      > business to create a great finance department,
      > project management team,
      > design department, or even management team - you're
      > in business to provide a
      > product or service the customer is willing to
      > purchase from you, whatever it
      > is. You, or whoever is leading this change, needs
      > to send a clear message
      > that you are going into this journey with an open
      > mind and a willingness to
      > adjust for the sake of the enterprise, not some
      > fragmented subcomponent of
      > the organization. Does everyone in your
      > organization comprehend that they
      > are there to support the repair industry?
      >
      > OK, I'll get off my soapbox now.
      >
      > Drop a line if you have any more questions.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Jim
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Leading the Way to Competitive Advantage
      >
      >
      > Jim McKechnie
      > Principal Consultant James R. McKechnie &
      > Associates
      > P. O. Box 500031
      >
      <http://maps.yahoo.com/py/maps.py?Pyt=Tmap&addr=P.+O.+Box+500031&csz=San+Die
      > go%2C+CA++92150-0031&country=us>
      > San Diego, CA 92150-0031
      > mckechnie@...
      > www.jrmckechnie.com <http://www.jrmckechnie.com/>
      > tel:
      > mobile: (858) 486-4149
      > (858) 213-9036
      >
      >
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      > _____
      >
      > From: freddgrabber [mailto:freddgrabber@...]
      > Sent: Saturday, May 22, 2004 10:51 AM
      > To: CImprovement@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Continuous Improvement] CI in Repair
      > Industry
      >
      >
      > Greetings all,
      >
      > My company does 90% repair and only 10% 'real'
      > production. We do
      > not have a good grasp of what our customers will
      > send us from any
      > day to day. Management has began a 'lean
      > transformation'.
      > The problems-
      > 1)We have been having hard time getting buy-in from
      > the worker bees
      > (and middle mgmt). What can I do to get more buy-in
      > from the
      > employees (especially the 'seasoned' employees)?
      > 2)What experiences exist similar to my situation
      > that I can draw
      > experience from?
      > 3)What references (reading material) deal
      > specifically with the
      > problems of repair vs production? Is there an
      > example of a company
      > doing this before? I'm sure there is I just don't
      > know where to
      > look.
      >
      >
      > I am very new in this area and appreciate any help.
      >
      > Thanks in advance,
      >
      > Fred
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      >
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    • Jim McKechnie
      Hi Fred, Yes, the US Navy is tackling exactly the same issues with their ship repair facility in San Diego. They have the typical silo structure of
      Message 2 of 6 , May 24 12:15 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Fred,

        Yes, the US Navy is tackling exactly the same issues with their ship repair
        facility in San Diego. They have the typical silo structure of departments
        based on their functionality. We are driving toward realigning based on
        value streams, but it's slow going with the government and civil service
        folks that have not been through a "significant emotional event" as of yet.
        Tenacity and constancy of purpose will wear them down, though.

        The performance appraisal is part of it, but the most important challenge is
        to create the "cultural shift" from thinking "I - ME - MY" to one of "is
        this the best decision or action for the enterprise." I would still suggest
        you read the books I recommended. They will put many of the pieces together
        for you.

        If you have specific issues and wish to put them up for discussion, please
        do so.

        Jim

        ------------------------------------
        James R. McKechnie & Associates
        Jim McKechnie
        Principal Consultant
        mckechnie@...
        P. O. Box 500031
        San Diego, CA 92150-0031
        tel: (858) 486-4149
        mobile: (858) 213-9036
        www.jrmckechnie.com
        ------------------------------------

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Fredd Grabber [mailto:freddgrabber@...]
        Sent: Monday, May 24, 2004 5:52 AM
        To: CImprovement@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: freddgrabber@...
        Subject: [Continuous Improvement] Re: CI in Repair Industry: AKA We're
        Different, Lean won't work here!

        Jim thanks for the great thoughts.

        Repair as identified to me in this specific context is the only value added
        portion. Our customer send us broken stuff and we repair it, ie we do not
        have a true production line that produces our product, our 'product' is a
        customer repaired item. There are hundreds of versions and iterations that
        we recieve.
        Rework is another story...Previously we have taken the inspect to improve
        approach. We are trying to tackle that mentality as well. My opinion, is
        that our repair process does have some unique challenges, I have seen to
        much evidence to say lean cannot improve our processes.

        Your exactly correct, for the most part, our structure has remained the
        same. There has been some movement toward implementing type of
        perf-appraisal system to encourage movement towards lean thinking. Maybe
        that is the key, the perf-appraisal system. Are there examples of the key
        concepts to a successfull system?
        Any good resources on this?

        I appreciate all your thought-provoking comments.

        Fred


        --- Jim McKechnie <mckechnie@...> wrote:
        > Hi Fred,
        >
        > The fact that you say 90% repair and only 10% real production raises
        > the
        > question: How do you define "repair?" Is this rework? Now, if you
        > were say that 90% of there time and efforts are spent on "non-value
        > added" activities and 10% on "value added," then I'd say you're pretty
        > much typical of most manufacturing operations. In your subject line,
        > you suggest you are in the "repair industry." Does this mean that
        > your industry might be different from all the rest, and maybe there is
        > some justification for the issues at hand? Some people will jump
        > right in and try to address your "problems" by listening to your
        > "symptoms" but without the critical information, the answers you will
        > receive could very well lead you to the wrong actions.
        >
        > Let's try to get a little more focused on your questions. On your
        > first question, keep in mind there are libraries full of books on your
        > issue. The first thing I might ask is who is leading the change?
        > When you say you're having a "hard time getting buy-in," it may
        > suggest that the communication of the change is inappropriate. For
        > example, have the middle managers been given an "adult to adult"
        > direction from senior management as to their expectations? And, have
        > these same managers been notified their performance appraisals now are
        > weighted by their proactivity and accomplishments directly related to
        > the transformation? If the answers to these questions are "No!" then
        > I think I have an idea why there is a "buy in" symptom.
        >
        > Go out and buy the book "Leading Change" by John P.
        > Kotter and read it. As
        > a matter of fact, have the entire management team read it an make them
        > identify specific metrics to validate they are really leading the
        > change (once these metrics are established, put them in the appraisals
        > and periodic reviews). Right after you finish that book, buy and read
        > "The Toyota Way"
        > by Jeffrey Liker. Both of these books are most inciteful in their
        > depictions of what you need to do and why.
        >
        > There may also be a lack of vision for the organization. Does
        > everyone truly understand how critical it is to change internally?
        > Has the organization structure been left in tact from before the
        > change in direction (most people will say, "Well sure! Why would we
        > change it?" Keep in mind, the organization structure you currently
        > have in place was designed to give you the results you have been
        > getting - NOT REALLY GOOD! What you need to do is get your value
        > streams identified and streamlined, then realign your people to meet
        > the value stream needs. You see, the processes should not be
        > subservient to the organization structure - it has to be the other way
        > around. This is scary, isn't it? Guess what! Your organization is
        > not in business to create a great finance department, project
        > management team, design department, or even management team - you're
        > in business to provide a product or service the customer is willing to
        > purchase from you, whatever it is. You, or whoever is leading this
        > change, needs to send a clear message that you are going into this
        > journey with an open mind and a willingness to adjust for the sake of
        > the enterprise, not some fragmented subcomponent of the organization.
        > Does everyone in your organization comprehend that they are there to
        > support the repair industry?
        >
        > OK, I'll get off my soapbox now.
        >
        > Drop a line if you have any more questions.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Jim
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Leading the Way to Competitive Advantage
        >
        >
        > Jim McKechnie
        > Principal Consultant James R. McKechnie &
        > Associates
        > P. O. Box 500031
        >
        <http://maps.yahoo.com/py/maps.py?Pyt=Tmap&addr=P.+O.+Box+500031&csz=San+Die
        > go%2C+CA++92150-0031&country=us>
        > San Diego, CA 92150-0031
        > mckechnie@...
        > www.jrmckechnie.com <http://www.jrmckechnie.com/>
        > tel:
        > mobile: (858) 486-4149
        > (858) 213-9036
        >
        >
        > <http://www.plaxo.com/signature> Signature powered by Plaxo
        > <http://www.plaxo.com/signature> Want a signature
        > like this?
        >
        >
        <https://www.plaxo.com/add_me?u=12885156928&v0=504177&k0=-1526054375>
        > Add
        > me to your address book...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: freddgrabber [mailto:freddgrabber@...]
        > Sent: Saturday, May 22, 2004 10:51 AM
        > To: CImprovement@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Continuous Improvement] CI in Repair Industry
        >
        >
        > Greetings all,
        >
        > My company does 90% repair and only 10% 'real'
        > production. We do
        > not have a good grasp of what our customers will
        > send us from any
        > day to day. Management has began a 'lean
        > transformation'.
        > The problems-
        > 1)We have been having hard time getting buy-in from
        > the worker bees
        > (and middle mgmt). What can I do to get more buy-in
        > from the
        > employees (especially the 'seasoned' employees)?
        > 2)What experiences exist similar to my situation
        > that I can draw
        > experience from?
        > 3)What references (reading material) deal
        > specifically with the
        > problems of repair vs production? Is there an
        > example of a company
        > doing this before? I'm sure there is I just don't
        > know where to
        > look.
        >
        >
        > I am very new in this area and appreciate any help.
        >
        > Thanks in advance,
        >
        > Fred
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        >
        > ADVERTISEMENT
        >
        >
        <http://rd.yahoo.com/SIG=129jmnlvm/M=285832.4982638.6115487.1269404/D=groups
        >
        /S=1705000236:HM/EXP=1085334665/A=2142721/R=0/SIG=14di1pg12/*http://www.hous
        >
        eholdfinance.com/ln/TrackingServlet?cmd_MediaCode=&fc=APS&mkt=000&mc=01PSYAY
        > A004001B220000U0300L0020000000000&dest=HOME_PAGE>
        > click here
        >
        >
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        > :HM/A=2142721/rand=146974577>
        >
        > _____
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        === message truncated ===





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