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Re: [CHICAGOTRANSIT] CTA 2012 Historical Calendar

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  • Frank Kennedy
    Thanks for this post. Thanks for sharing! On Sat, 31 Dec 2011 19:46:14 -0000, George
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 1, 2012
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      Thanks for this post. Thanks for sharing!


      On Sat, 31 Dec 2011 19:46:14 -0000, "George"
      <gfoelschow@...> wrote:

      >The 2012 Chicago Transit Authority Historical Calendar is now available for downloading and printing. Earlier calendars are also archived. To quote a longtime Chicago railfan: "It was a better world."
      >
      >Link: <http://www.transitchicago.com/about/historicalcalendar.aspx>
      >
      >
      >
    • Michael T.
      ... To play spoiler, I found an error...the page for December, 2012 shows two of the CSL Nearsides on Cottage Grove Avenue. The date that was listed in the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 2, 2012
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        --- In CHICAGOTRANSIT@yahoogroups.com, "George" <gfoelschow@...> wrote:
        >
        > The 2012 Chicago Transit Authority Historical Calendar is now available for downloading and printing. Earlier calendars are also archived. To quote a longtime Chicago railfan: "It was a better world."
        >
        > Link: <http://www.transitchicago.com/about/historicalcalendar.aspx>
        >

        To play spoiler, I found an error...the page for December, 2012 shows two of the CSL Nearsides on Cottage Grove Avenue. The date that was listed in the calendar for the Nearsides going into service was 1908. OOPS! The actual year for those cars was 1912, the third largest fleet of those cars outside of my neck of the woods. The choice of Nearside cars by Chicago City Railway was made at the behest of Thomas E. Mitten, who had come to Chicago early in the 20th Century.
        In addition, he was also connected with International Railway of Buffalo, NY, where he developed the idea that became the Nearside car in 1911. (Now comes the obligatory part of my message...)Just before that, he was contacted by one Edward T. Stotesbury, who had obtained financial control of Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company from the Widener-Elkins group...the main part of the group, Peter A.B. Widener, was aging, and I can't say if his son George was interested. (In any event, it wouldn't have mattered...in early 1912, George Widener was in Eirope, and decided to return on a brand new ship being introduced into service in early April, the RMS Titanic...Widener went down with the Titanic, along with 1500 other passengers and crew.) ANyhow, Mitten used the Nearside as the cornerstone for a massive renewal of the PRT surface fleet that saw 2000 older cars replaced by 1500 Nearside cars.
        There's precedence that there are people at big transit agencies who have as one of their duties to read what is being written about them on the Internet...SEPTA has one, and I suspect CTA also has one. Hopefully, that person sees this message, and perhaps prints an errata sheet that clears the error on the Nearside entry into Chicago service up...send me an e-mail off-list for more details. (Roy, Andre, and William Shapotkin, I'm surprised you didn't pick up on this little error-MTG
      • George
        ... Michael, I m surprised that you didn t find the error in the caption for February 2012, stating that the Chicago Avenue car in the post World War II era
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 2, 2012
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          --- In CHICAGOTRANSIT@yahoogroups.com, "Michael T." <michael_t_greene@...> wrote:
          >
          > To play spoiler, I found an error...the page for December, 2012 shows two of the CSL Nearsides on Cottage Grove Avenue. The date that was listed in the calendar for the Nearsides going into service was 1908. OOPS! The actual year for those cars was 1912, the third largest fleet of those cars outside of my neck of the woods. The choice of Nearside cars by Chicago City Railway was made at the behest of Thomas E. Mitten, who had come to Chicago early in the 20th Century.
          > (snipped)

          Michael, I'm surprised that you didn't find the error in the caption for February 2012, stating that the Chicago Avenue car in the post World War II era was on its way to Navy Pier. There was a post-war PCC on Clark Street. Service to Navy Pier by Chicago Avenue cars ended March 15, 1937, years before the war, when the east terminal became Lake Shore Drive.

          Actually, to its credit, CTA employs very competent persons to serve as historians. The companies that comprised predecessor Chicago Surface Lines had a very complex history, so errors do creep into the narrative. The ultimate comprehensive history of CSL has never been written, and probably never will be. Alan Lind's book, while a creditable effort, was criticized for its errors when published. CERA has attempted a history, devoting years and considerable effort to no result. In the meantime, the persons that are CSL experts are either dead or dwindling in number.
        • Michael T.
          ... No, but not being a Chicago native or or longtime resident, it would have skipped my notice. There was another whopper, a mathematical one, that I didn t
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 3, 2012
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            --- In CHICAGOTRANSIT@yahoogroups.com, "George" <gfoelschow@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In CHICAGOTRANSIT@yahoogroups.com, "Michael T." <michael_t_greene@> wrote:
            > >
            > > To play spoiler, I found an error...the page for December, 2012 shows two of the CSL Nearsides on Cottage Grove Avenue. The date that was listed in the calendar for the Nearsides going into service was 1908. OOPS! The actual year for those cars was 1912, the third largest fleet of those cars outside of my neck of the woods. The choice of Nearside cars by Chicago City Railway was made at the behest of Thomas E. Mitten, who had come to Chicago early in the 20th Century.
            > > (snipped)
            >
            > Michael, I'm surprised that you didn't find the error in the caption for February 2012, stating that the Chicago Avenue car in the post World War II era was on its way to Navy Pier. There was a post-war PCC on Clark Street. Service to Navy Pier by Chicago Avenue cars ended March 15, 1937, years before the war, when the east terminal became Lake Shore Drive.

            No, but not being a Chicago native or or longtime resident, it would have skipped my notice. There was another whopper, a mathematical one, that I didn't mention, regarding the back story of the 6000-series L cars. If anybody who's seen the calendar(and who's on this list) doesn't mention it here on this thread, I'll have to do so.

            >
            > Actually, to its credit, CTA employs very competent persons to serve as historians. The companies that comprised predecessor Chicago Surface Lines had a very complex history, so errors do creep into the narrative. The ultimate comprehensive history of CSL has never been written, and probably never will be. Alan Lind's book, while a creditable effort, was criticized for its errors when published. CERA has attempted a history, devoting years and considerable effort to no result. In the meantime, the persons that are CSL experts are either dead or dwindling in number.
            >
            Well, we know that CTA employs Bruce Moffit(or did?...remember, distance works against me here on this group) as a planner...they'd be fools if they didn't see him if they plan to include an L car on their calendars...when I last looked, he DID write a book on the history of the L system running up to the Depression, a book that's in my house somewhere. I will suspect that calendar planning is NOT among his responsibilities-MTG
          • chicagopcc
            Mr. Bruce Moffat, author of The L , is still employed by the CTA. Chatted with him on one of the Holiday Trains in December. David Harrison
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 3, 2012
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              Mr. Bruce Moffat, author of "The 'L'", is still employed by the CTA. Chatted with him on one of the Holiday Trains in December.

              David Harrison

              --- In CHICAGOTRANSIT@yahoogroups.com, "Michael T." <michael_t_greene@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In CHICAGOTRANSIT@yahoogroups.com, "George" <gfoelschow@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In CHICAGOTRANSIT@yahoogroups.com, "Michael T." <michael_t_greene@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > To play spoiler, I found an error...the page for December, 2012 shows two of the CSL Nearsides on Cottage Grove Avenue. The date that was listed in the calendar for the Nearsides going into service was 1908. OOPS! The actual year for those cars was 1912, the third largest fleet of those cars outside of my neck of the woods. The choice of Nearside cars by Chicago City Railway was made at the behest of Thomas E. Mitten, who had come to Chicago early in the 20th Century.
              > > > (snipped)
              > >
              > > Michael, I'm surprised that you didn't find the error in the caption for February 2012, stating that the Chicago Avenue car in the post World War II era was on its way to Navy Pier. There was a post-war PCC on Clark Street. Service to Navy Pier by Chicago Avenue cars ended March 15, 1937, years before the war, when the east terminal became Lake Shore Drive.
              >
              > No, but not being a Chicago native or or longtime resident, it would have skipped my notice. There was another whopper, a mathematical one, that I didn't mention, regarding the back story of the 6000-series L cars. If anybody who's seen the calendar(and who's on this list) doesn't mention it here on this thread, I'll have to do so.
              >
              > >
              > > Actually, to its credit, CTA employs very competent persons to serve as historians. The companies that comprised predecessor Chicago Surface Lines had a very complex history, so errors do creep into the narrative. The ultimate comprehensive history of CSL has never been written, and probably never will be. Alan Lind's book, while a creditable effort, was criticized for its errors when published. CERA has attempted a history, devoting years and considerable effort to no result. In the meantime, the persons that are CSL experts are either dead or dwindling in number.
              > >
              > Well, we know that CTA employs Bruce Moffit(or did?...remember, distance works against me here on this group) as a planner...they'd be fools if they didn't see him if they plan to include an L car on their calendars...when I last looked, he DID write a book on the history of the L system running up to the Depression, a book that's in my house somewhere. I will suspect that calendar planning is NOT among his responsibilities-MTG
              >
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