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Re: [CGWcostumers] shoe stretch [was Re: cleaning methods? (gloves, fur)

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  • cra2@aol.com
    Dear Linda. Thanks so much. Unfortunately, there is no listing for this company and they are not even listed with the Secretary of State as an active
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 31, 2012
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      Dear Linda.  Thanks so much.  Unfortunately, there is no listing for this company and they are not even listed with the Secretary of State as an active corporation.  Thanks, though.
       
      If I find a shoe stretch spray (someone must make them), do you think it would be safe to use on my too small leather opera gloves?  Cheryl
       
       
      Cheryl R. Avirom
      attorney at law
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      LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 90814

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    • Linda Abrams
      Cheryl, I don t know. Glove leather is finer/softer than shoe leather. I suppose it would also depend upon just how tight they are: can you get your hands
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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        Cheryl,

        I don't know. Glove leather is finer/softer than shoe leather. I
        suppose it would also depend upon just how tight they are: can you
        get your hands into them, but they're just snug, or are they a whole
        size too small? If you can't get your hands into them at all, I
        would not expect anything to stretch leather that much. As to
        whether safe to try: I might try it on merely-snug, dark-colored
        gloves, but I'm finding out that soft, thin white leather is awfully
        delicate and I would not try stretching that.

        Linda
      • Linda Abrams
        Also, re: finding the shoe stretch spray, you might try your friendly local shoe-repair shop. Linda
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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          Also, re: finding the shoe stretch spray, you might try your friendly
          local shoe-repair shop.

          Linda
        • Ganntours
          Hi, Shh, do not let this get around but - the product known as #Shoe Stretch# is actually just rubbing alcohol.  That is one of the reasons they do not list
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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            Hi,

            Shh, do not let this get around but - the product known as #Shoe Stretch# is actually just rubbing alcohol.  That is one of the reasons they do not list the ingredients on the label because you would not pay that much for such a small bottle of the stuff.  This info was given to me by a friend who worked in a shoe store many years ago.  It only works on leather and helps it stretch. 

             If you need to clean smooth leather (not suede) I would suggest a product line called Lexol.  They make cleaners and conditioners and I used to get them at shoe repair places, leather stores (like Tandys or the Leather Factory), sometimes at Michaels (if they carry leather crafts) or maybe places like Wilsons House of Suede and Leather. If you have a saddlery and riding tack store close to you that would also be a good place to check out. You might try certain automotive or hardware stores (leather upholstery needs love too).  There is likely a website as well. 

            I will do a little digging for help with fur and suede.      Annie M.



            Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ II Skyrocket™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone.
          • Tim Cardy
            The old shoe stretch spray was taken of the market because it was toxic. There is a new company that makes a spray: www.spraygenie.com The old way of making
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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              The old shoe stretch spray was taken of the market because it was toxic. There is a new company that makes a spray: www.spraygenie.com

              The old way of making shoe stretch spray is 50% rubbing alcohol with 50% distilled water. Spray the inside of the shoes and wear them until dry. I've use it for years in the costume/dance business. You can spray the outside too, which will speed up the stretch, but darker dyes can be affected by the alcohol.

              The spray works reasonably well for leather gloves.

              I have found a wash with saddle soap is great for soiled gloves. Don't wring them when wet or youll need stretchers to get them back into shape.

              Tim Cardy
              Realtor

              Sotheby's International Realty
              805 637 0878
              Lic#01895346
              Allow me to help you find your Santa Barbara dream home!

              SBFinehomes.com
            • Fran Wasielewski
              I truly recommend Lexol products. I used them to clean tack, riding gloves and Dressage boots. They deep-cleaned, softened, and did not leave yellow residue.
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 2, 2012
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                I truly recommend Lexol products. I used them to clean tack, riding gloves and Dressage boots. They deep-cleaned, softened, and did not leave yellow residue. This is very good for keeping light-colored riding britches pristine.
                Fran Wasielewski
              • kittenfu1
                Shoe stretching: I have good results with a mixture of Isopropyl Alcohol and water (some say even amounts some say 3:1 going either way), the best is to mix
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 3, 2012
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                  Shoe stretching:
                  I have good results with a mixture of Isopropyl Alcohol and water (some say even amounts some say 3:1 going either way), the best is to mix in a spray bottle that has a light 'misting' spray lightly from the inside where shoes are tight. Then wear the shoes when NOT walking till dry (this can be done while sitting at the computer). Stretch the shoes gradually. Also don't hesitate to order a pair of (wooden & metal only) shoe trees. You can get them on Amazon or from a shoe repair. Keep shoes someplace out of drafts and light, take them out and clean them with leather conditioner once a year as leather dries and shrinks out over time. This is the reason that vintage shoes are so hard to fit, both shrinkage and changes in shoe sizing and shapes over time. Finally, don't forget what our grandmother did, stuff (and I do mean stuff) your shoes with newspaper or tissue paper if you have it. once you have the shoe filled, you can use this mold of paper indefinitely.

                  For tight leather opera gloves, I agree if they can't be put on -don't. However you can do as ladies did in the past and use talcum powder to help you slip them on.
                  If they are hard to get on but you can wear them, the put them on (no powder is better for this). Then use a leather conditioner/cleaner (Don't forget to test some of it on the gloves in a tiny spot and wait till dry to make sure you don't get a color change before you start) and smooth it over the gloves where tight - use sparingly!! Put in a costume drama, flex your hand a BIT every NOW and THEN and wait till completely dry. Store the gloves in a closed acid free box.

                  Cleaning gloves:
                  Clean tight gloves while wearing them only! Fabric can be cleaned in cold water with a mild soap - rinse three times, dry lightly with a towel and again wear till dry if they are tight on you.

                  Leather gloves: like shoes dry using a clean soft brush first, second dabbing with a very lightly damp with 50?50 water and alcohol, very clean white cloth just on the spots, third using a soft clean brush (like a child's toothbrush) with leather conditioner/cleaner gently and it is better to make a few passes than to distress the leather with overwork.

                  Hope this is helpful
                  Cynthia

                  --- In CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com, Linda Abrams <lasprite@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The shoe stretch spray that I have is called "Expert's Choice Shoe
                  > Stretch Spray" and the package says it is by Adcor Products, Brea, CA
                  > 92821. However the bottle itself says Adcor Products, Inc., Orange,
                  > CA 92667
                  >
                  > HTH,
                  >
                  > Linda
                  >
                  > g
                  > Re: cleaning methods? (gloves, fur)
                  >
                  > Tue Aug 28, 2012 8:40 pm (PDT) . Posted by:
                  > "cra2@..." cra2cgw
                  > I, too, have white leather gloves that are too small [funny, I don't buy
                  > shoes that don't fit, why can't I resist vintage gloves?]. Where does
                  > one get
                  > leather stretch? And has anyone tried the alcohol stretch on shoes or
                  > gloves? Thanks. Cheryl
                  >
                • fauxrari
                  When I did Celtic dancing, we would buy out ghillies (dance shoes) a couple of sizes too small, put them on and soak them in a warm bath tub and let them dry
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 3, 2012
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                    When I did Celtic dancing, we would buy out ghillies (dance shoes) a couple of sizes too small, put them on and soak them in a warm bath tub and let them dry as we wore them so they would contour to the exact shape of our feet. I just bought a new pair of Roman shoes and they were a little snug, so I did the same thing and since they were just veg tanned, I followed that up with a coat of neatsfeet oil. The oil really helps the leather stay supple. If you do stretch your gloves/shoes successfully, I would suggest looking for a conditioning product to keep it from getting brittle. Wilson's is a good place for leather products if you don't live close to Tandy's. I had good luck with the Roman shoes. Good luck with the gloves.

                    Lisa K-B

                    --- In CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com, Tim Cardy <tacardy@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The old shoe stretch spray was taken of the market because it was toxic. There is a new company that makes a spray: www.spraygenie.com
                    >
                    > The old way of making shoe stretch spray is 50% rubbing alcohol with 50% distilled water. Spray the inside of the shoes and wear them until dry. I've use it for years in the costume/dance business. You can spray the outside too, which will speed up the stretch, but darker dyes can be affected by the alcohol.
                    >
                    > The spray works reasonably well for leather gloves.
                    >
                    > I have found a wash with saddle soap is great for soiled gloves. Don't wring them when wet or youll need stretchers to get them back into shape.
                    >
                    > Tim Cardy
                    > Realtor
                    >
                    > Sotheby's International Realty
                    > 805 637 0878
                    > Lic#01895346
                    > Allow me to help you find your Santa Barbara dream home!
                    >
                    > SBFinehomes.com
                    >
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