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Re: [CGWcostumers] Quilted Petticoat

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  • LoraleePage
    Thank you Cynthia. If I baste using my standard sewing machine, how close would be advisable for the rows? I assume I would want to go in just one direction
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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      Thank you Cynthia.  If I baste using my standard sewing machine, how close would be advisable for the rows?  I assume I would want to go in just one direction and not turn around and come back?

      Thanks-
      Loralee

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Apr 17, 2011, at 12:24 PM, Cin <CinBarnes@...> wrote:

       

      On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 12:02 PM, lpageortez <loraleepage@...> wrote:
      > I am thinking about attempting a Georgian quilted petticoat, and any advise is appreciated.  I plan to use cotton and hand quilt it...

      Here's my insta-resume: I'm a veteran of 45 quilts, 7 of them hand
      quilted. Also did a few quilting garment elements.
      Since your questions are limited, I'll restrict my answers to what
      you've asked or mentioned.
      Cotton is an excellent choice as are silks that arent too stiff.

      > Am wondering how feasible it is to NOT use a hoop, as it would make the project so much more portable.  (If it cant go with me, it is not likely to get done.)

      Totally feasible & my preferred method. You can lap quilt (with
      neither frame nor hoop), if and only if you baste first.

      Have you ever done quilting before? It will take a very long time.
      Plan accordingly. You might want to make one w/ prequilted fabric just
      to see how the assembly process works.

      Realize that usually the CF triangle is seen so you can do all manner
      of cheats until you finish the back section. When you finish the
      back, maybe that's when you do a shorter carico or pet-en-l'air.

      One way to cheat is to use a more technical modern batt such as Hobbs
      Heirloom Premium or Warm & Natural
      http://www.warmcompany.com/wnpage.html batts. These batts dont
      require stitches as close together as just-carded cotton does. You can
      do broad outlines of your design up to 9" apart then fill in the
      detail parts of your pattern as you have time. Technical batts also
      dont wad up in the wash. This is undoubltly more of an issue in
      quilted clothing than in quilted blankets or wall hangings.

      > I plan to assemble the "sandwich" and sew those pieces together prior to quilting.

      A very nice option, if you have a friend or a local quilt shop with a
      quilting machine, is to have the basting done on the machine. This
      stretches the 3 sandwich layers (fashion fabric, batt & lining)
      correctly w/o bumps & bubbles. Bumps & bubbles are a typical beginner
      problem.
      --cin
      Cynthia Barnes
      CinBarnes@...

    • Cin
      You cant use your std machine for basting a quilt/ quilted garment. Too much drag even w/ a roller foot. (Remember those bubbles I mentioned? Using a std
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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        You cant use your std machine for basting a quilt/ quilted garment.  Too much drag even w/ a roller foot.  (Remember those bubbles I mentioned?  Using a std machine to baste is the best way to get the fabric layers twisted & distorted.)
         
        Do you know how to Z-baste (by hand)?  That's the most effective way if you dont have access to a quilting machine.  A quilting machine is another no-drag system and has the advantage of applying correct tension in the layers.
        --cin
        Cynthia Barnes
        CinBarnes@...


        On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 1:10 PM, LoraleePage <loraleepage@...> wrote:


        Thank you Cynthia.  If I baste using my standard sewing machine, how close would be advisable for the rows?  I assume I would want to go in just one direction and not turn around and come back?
      • LoraleePage
        Thank you- I will google z- baste. I made a few baby quilts by machine in past. Used to do hand work but am currently out of practice. Will make a practice
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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          Thank you- I will google z- baste.  I made a few baby quilts by machine in past. Used to do hand work but am currently out of practice.  Will make a practice sample.

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Apr 17, 2011, at 1:18 PM, Cin <CinBarnes@...> wrote:

           

          You cant use your std machine for basting a quilt/ quilted garment.  Too much drag even w/ a roller foot.  (Remember those bubbles I mentioned?  Using a std machine to baste is the best way to get the fabric layers twisted & distorted.)
           
          Do you know how to Z-baste (by hand)?  That's the most effective way if you dont have access to a quilting machine.  A quilting machine is another no-drag system and has the advantage of applying correct tension in the layers.
          --cin
          Cynthia Barnes
          CinBarnes@...


          On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 1:10 PM, LoraleePage <loraleepage@...> wrote:


          Thank you Cynthia.  If I baste using my standard sewing machine, how close would be advisable for the rows?  I assume I would want to go in just one direction and not turn around and come back?

        • Cin
          http://hubpages.com/hub/How-to-Hand-Baste-A-Quilt Look at 2nd video. Ignore the voice over. --cin Cynthia Barnes CinBarnes@gmail.com
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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            Look at 2nd video.  Ignore the voice over.
            --cin
            Cynthia Barnes
            CinBarnes@...


            On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 2:22 PM, LoraleePage <loraleepage@...> wrote:


            Thank you- I will google z- baste.  I made a few baby quilts by machine in past. Used to do hand work but am currently out of practice.  Will make a practice sample.

            Sent from my iPhone
          • Claudine
            Hi Cin, What about using a walking foot to do the basting? Just curious, in case I find myself in a similar situation. Claudine
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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              Hi Cin,

              What about using a walking foot to do the basting? Just curious, in case I find myself in a similar situation.



              Claudine


              From: Cin <CinBarnes@...>
              To: CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sun, April 17, 2011 1:18:21 PM
              Subject: Re: [CGWcostumers] Quilted Petticoat



              You cant use your std machine for basting a quilt/ quilted garment.  Too much drag even w/ a roller foot.  (Remember those bubbles I mentioned?  Using a std machine to baste is the best way to get the fabric layers twisted & distorted.)
               
              Do you know how to Z-baste (by hand)?  That's the most effective way if you dont have access to a quilting machine.  A quilting machine is another no-drag system and has the advantage of applying correct tension in the layers.
              --cin
              Cynthia Barnes
              CinBarnes@...


              On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 1:10 PM, LoraleePage <loraleepage@...> wrote:


              Thank you Cynthia.  If I baste using my standard sewing machine, how close would be advisable for the rows?  I assume I would want to go in just one direction and not turn around and come back?


            • Cin
              Claudine, I found the walking foot (which I called a roller foot in a prev email) unacceptable for even mid-sized items like a pourpoint or baby blanket. From
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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                Claudine,
                I found the walking foot (which I called a roller foot in a prev email) unacceptable for even mid-sized items like a pourpoint or baby blanket.  From the drag & twist point of view, the walking/ roller foot works OK for basting very small items, like basting the edge of a quilted Tudor under sleeve or an 18th tie-on pocket.
                 
                What I really didnt like was the track of holes left behind in the silk I'd used on another failed project.  Recall that the basting threads occupy a dfferent line of stitching than the quilting threads.  The bastings are removed, leaving unsightly holes. If you keep the machine basting inside the seam allowance or under the edge binding, it's fine.                
                --cin
                Cynthia Barnes
                CinBarnes@...


                On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 5:54 PM, Claudine <claudine_on_the_net@...> wrote:


                Hi Cin,

                What about using a walking foot to do the basting? Just curious, in case I find myself in a similar situation.



                Claudine


                From: Cin <CinBarnes@...>
                To: CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sun, April 17, 2011 1:18:21 PM
                Subject: Re: [CGWcostumers] Quilted Petticoat



                You cant use your std machine for basting a quilt/ quilted garment.  Too much drag even w/ a roller foot.  (Remember those bubbles I mentioned?  Using a std machine to baste is the best way to get the fabric layers twisted & distorted.)
                 
                Do you know how to Z-baste (by hand)?  That's the most effective way if you dont have access to a quilting machine.  A quilting machine is another no-drag system and has the advantage of applying correct tension in the layers.
                --cin
                Cynthia Barnes
                CinBarnes@...


                On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 1:10 PM, LoraleePage <loraleepage@...> wrote:


                Thank you Cynthia.  If I baste using my standard sewing machine, how close would be advisable for the rows?  I assume I would want to go in just one direction and not turn around and come back?





              • Claudine
                Oh, I see. I have two different feet: a walking foot (because it steps up and down as you stitch) and a roller foot (because it has wheels...I forget what it s
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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                  Oh, I see. I have two different feet: a walking foot (because it steps up and down as you stitch) and a roller foot (because it has wheels...I forget what it's useful for).

                  Of course, I don't disagree that hand basting is the way to go, I was just wondering if there might not be a way to save time. :)

                  Agreed with basting leaving holes...I haven't watched the video you posted but I assume Z-basting tends to avoid this?




                  Claudine


                  From: Cin <CinBarnes@...>
                  To: CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sun, April 17, 2011 6:25:11 PM
                  Subject: Re: [CGWcostumers] Quilted Petticoat



                  Claudine,
                  I found the walking foot (which I called a roller foot in a prev email) unacceptable for even mid-sized items like a pourpoint or baby blanket.  From the drag & twist point of view, the walking/ roller foot works OK for basting very small items, like basting the edge of a quilted Tudor under sleeve or an 18th tie-on pocket.
                   
                  What I really didnt like was the track of holes left behind in the silk I'd used on another failed project.  Recall that the basting threads occupy a dfferent line of stitching than the quilting threads.  The bastings are removed, leaving unsightly holes. If you keep the machine basting inside the seam allowance or under the edge binding, it's fine.                
                  --cin
                  Cynthia Barnes
                  CinBarnes@...


                  On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 5:54 PM, Claudine <claudine_on_the_net@...> wrote:


                  Hi Cin,

                  What about using a walking foot to do the basting? Just curious, in case I find myself in a similar situation.



                  Claudine


                  From: Cin <CinBarnes@...>
                  To: CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sun, April 17, 2011 1:18:21 PM
                  Subject: Re: [CGWcostumers] Quilted Petticoat



                  You cant use your std machine for basting a quilt/ quilted garment.  Too much drag even w/ a roller foot.  (Remember those bubbles I mentioned?  Using a std machine to baste is the best way to get the fabric layers twisted & distorted.)
                   
                  Do you know how to Z-baste (by hand)?  That's the most effective way if you dont have access to a quilting machine.  A quilting machine is another no-drag system and has the advantage of applying correct tension in the layers.
                  --cin
                  Cynthia Barnes
                  CinBarnes@...


                  On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 1:10 PM, LoraleePage <loraleepage@...> wrote:


                  Thank you Cynthia.  If I baste using my standard sewing machine, how close would be advisable for the rows?  I assume I would want to go in just one direction and not turn around and come back?







                • Cin
                  Good Q, Claudine, You still get a hole now & again, but w/ hand basting the Zs are 1-2 apart, but the machine stitches are the longest your machine will do.
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 17, 2011
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                    Good Q, Claudine,
                    You still get a hole now & again, but w/ hand basting the Zs are 1-2"
                    apart, but the machine stitches are the longest your machine will do.
                    On mine that's only 6mm in a continuuous, obvious line. With
                    hand-basting you can choose where the holes are, FWIW.
                    --cin
                    Cynthia Barnes
                    CinBarnes@...

                    > Agreed with basting leaving holes...I haven't watched the video you posted but I assume Z-basting tends to avoid this?
                    >
                    > Claudine
                  • fauxrari
                    I agree that either Hobb s or Warm & Natural are the ways to go. I redid my husband s quilted Roman subarmalis (under armor padding) with Warm & Natural and it
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 18, 2011
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                      I agree that either Hobb's or Warm & Natural are the ways to go. I redid my husband's quilted Roman subarmalis (under armor padding) with Warm & Natural and it was great. Hobb's wool products are fluffy and can be pretty warm. I am also an art quilter and do some pretty messed up stuff with batting and I find these products work very well.

                      Another question to another Mrs. Barnes- What are your thoughts on saftey pin basting? I haven't had many problems with them, even when I used them on the subarmalis (it was made of cotton twill). I wouldn't do the back with them, I'd rather machine it, but it might me nice to have them on the front where you can move them as nedded as you sew.

                      Lisa Klassen-Barnes

                      --- In CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com, Cin <CinBarnes@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Good Q, Claudine,
                      > You still get a hole now & again, but w/ hand basting the Zs are 1-2"
                      > apart, but the machine stitches are the longest your machine will do.
                      > On mine that's only 6mm in a continuuous, obvious line. With
                      > hand-basting you can choose where the holes are, FWIW.
                      > --cin
                      > Cynthia Barnes
                      > CinBarnes@...
                      >
                      > > Agreed with basting leaving holes...I haven't watched the video you posted but I assume Z-basting tends to avoid this?
                      > >
                      > > Claudine
                      >
                    • Claudine
                      ... I would love to know what art quilter and pretty messed up stuff with batting mean...but perhaps off list, or some other time. :) Claudine
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 18, 2011
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                        ----- Original Message ----
                        > From: fauxrari <drivergirl@...>

                        >
                        > I am also an art quilter and do some pretty messed up stuff with batting and I
                        >find these products work very well.
                        >

                        I would love to know what "art quilter" and "pretty messed up stuff with
                        batting" mean...but perhaps off list, or some other time. :)




                        Claudine
                      • Cin
                        My dear Mrs K-Barnes, I like safety pin basting just fine, especially with the bent safety pins made just for quilters. (The bend reduces the distortion.)
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 18, 2011
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                          My dear Mrs K-Barnes,
                          I like safety pin "basting" just fine, especially with the bent safety
                          pins made just for quilters. (The bend reduces the distortion.) When I
                          was lap quilting on the road, it was typically for a living history
                          event. The safety pins werent period technique, but the Z-basting was
                          invisible enough for the museum.
                          --cin
                          Cynthia Barnes
                          CinBarnes@...

                          On Mon, Apr 18, 2011 at 4:37 PM, fauxrari <drivergirl@...> wrote:
                          <snip>
                          > Another question to another Mrs. Barnes- What are your thoughts on saftey pin basting? I haven't had many problems with them, even when I used them on the subarmalis (it was made of cotton twill). I wouldn't do the back with them, I'd rather machine it, but it might me nice to have them on the front where you can move them as nedded as you sew.
                          >
                          > Lisa Klassen-Barnes
                        • lpageortez
                          ... Thank you all for such good information. I am now becoming obsessed with this project- or at least the idea of same. Bought the fabric, Warm and Natural,
                          Message 12 of 14 , Apr 23, 2011
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                            --- In CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com, Cin <CinBarnes@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Good Q, Claudine,
                            > You still get a hole now & again, but w/ hand basting the Zs are 1-2"
                            > apart, but the machine stitches are the longest your machine will do.
                            > On mine that's only 6mm in a continuuous, obvious line. With
                            > hand-basting you can choose where the holes are, FWIW.
                            > --cin
                            > Cynthia Barnes
                            > CinBarnes@...
                            >
                            > >

                            Thank you all for such good information. I am now becoming obsessed with this project- or at least the idea of same. Bought the fabric, Warm and Natural, and am beginning to research the design. Took measurements from my other quilted petticoat (ready-quilted that is).

                            1) What type of thread would you recommend? The hand quilting thread only is available in a green that is a bit bluer or much darker than my fabric. (There is also white or off white.) There is a machine quilting thread close in color to the light green cotton i chose for the garment. Also, darker green from the proper color family is available in Heavy Thread. would i be period correct to assume that the thread should pretty much match the fabric? Or is darker okay?

                            2) For assembly- i am pondering making a tube with the sandwich first, then quilting. (Of course being careful to match up the seams and fabric grains.) I want the design to wrap all the way around.

                            all suggestions appreciated!

                            Thanks!

                            Loralee
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