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Re: [CGWcostumers] True Grit question

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  • Colleen Crosby
    Was it in the 1870s? We kept going back and forth on that. It ended in 1903, which was supposed to be a quarter-century after the action, but we thought the
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 26, 2010
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      Was it in the 1870s? We kept going back and forth on that. It ended in 1903, which was supposed to be a quarter-century after the action, but we thought the ages of the main characters didn't line up right, either. The darling husband said that since it was a frontier town, they could have been 10 years out of fashion, but I said there was no way all of the women would be that far out of fashion. So we settled on it taking place in the 1860s. :)

      Colleen

      On Sun, Dec 26, 2010 at 11:03 AM, <nightheron@...> wrote:
       

      I'm so glad I'm not the only one who had the same questions, comments, and observations after seeing True Grit! (I was anxious to find out if other costumers had the same observations!) My poor husband hand to listen to me rant about the horrible hoops after the movie. Not only were they lacking petticoats, but a few seemed to be poorly balanced. I had wondered if and why there was such a huge oversight by the costume department, or perhaps the women in Texas really wore their dresses this way? Not to mention, the movie takes place in the mid 1870s. I thought that large hoops like were well out of fashion by that time and women were easily wearing bustles?

      - Kathy



      On 12/26/2010 7:55 AM, Colleen Crosby wrote:
       

      I really enjoyed the new movie, True Grit.

      However, something really bugged me about it. In an early scene in the movie, we're in a western town sometime in the late 1860s. All the background women are wearing round hoops. Only one of them appeared to own a single petticoat.

      We spent quite a while after the movie discussing whether this was an oversight by the costume department or intentional. Could having the bones of the hoop wires show through their skirts really be used as a way to show how old west, tough, and stripped down the town was? Costume Designer Mary Zophres talks about dedication to historical research in a couple of online interviews.

      Any thoughts?
      Colleen



    • nightheron@pacbell.net
      Well, we went off the handbill that said 1903 - calculated back 25 years to 1878. (movie reviews also state the movie takes place in the late 1870s). We didn t
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 26, 2010
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        Well, we went off the handbill that said 1903 - calculated back 25 years to 1878. (movie reviews also state the movie takes place in the late 1870s). We didn't bother trying to line up the ages of the characters. My husband doesn't know a thing about fashion in history, but he also tried to argue that 'it was Texas, it was hot, they probably just didn't want to wear petticoats.' and I argued that even a single layer of pleated cotton voile would have helped and wouldn't have made them any hotter. LOL! We also speculated about them being behind the times and out of fashion on the frontier. But still, that far out? I'm not an expert at all though.

        I think it's funny that you and Shawn had nearly the same conversation! I really did enjoy the movie.

        - Kathy

        On 12/26/2010 11:28 AM, Colleen Crosby wrote:  

        Was it in the 1870s? We kept going back and forth on that. It ended in 1903, which was supposed to be a quarter-century after the action, but we thought the ages of the main characters didn't line up right, either. The darling husband said that since it was a frontier town, they could have been 10 years out of fashion, but I said there was no way all of the women would be that far out of fashion. So we settled on it taking place in the 1860s. :)

        Colleen

        On Sun, Dec 26, 2010 at 11:03 AM, <nightheron@...> wrote:
         

        I'm so glad I'm not the only one who had the same questions, comments, and observations after seeing True Grit! (I was anxious to find out if other costumers had the same observations!) My poor husband hand to listen to me rant about the horrible hoops after the movie. Not only were they lacking petticoats, but a few seemed to be poorly balanced. I had wondered if and why there was such a huge oversight by the costume department, or perhaps the women in Texas really wore their dresses this way? Not to mention, the movie takes place in the mid 1870s. I thought that large hoops like were well out of fashion by that time and women were easily wearing bustles?

        - Kathy



        On 12/26/2010 7:55 AM, Colleen Crosby wrote:
         

        I really enjoyed the new movie, True Grit.

        However, something really bugged me about it. In an early scene in the movie, we're in a western town sometime in the late 1860s. All the background women are wearing round hoops. Only one of them appeared to own a single petticoat.

        We spent quite a while after the movie discussing whether this was an oversight by the costume department or intentional. Could having the bones of the hoop wires show through their skirts really be used as a way to show how old west, tough, and stripped down the town was? Costume Designer Mary Zophres talks about dedication to historical research in a couple of online interviews.

        Any thoughts?
        Colleen




      • Jeannette
        Cohen Brothers films are highly stylized. I suspect the costume designer made a conscious decision to be inaccurate to make a strong visual impression. For
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 26, 2010
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          Cohen Brothers films are highly stylized. I suspect the costume designer made a conscious decision to be inaccurate to make a strong visual impression. For every person who would question the chronology and silhouette, there will be thousands who will just see a stark, old-time image. It may even be that the Cohen Brothers themselves insisted on that imagery. I’m working with a student director right now who is very close to making me chew my own arm off, and he’s not even doing a period piece.
           
          --Jeannette Darlington
          Mother of a Film Student
        • Diane M. Yoshitomi
          Got to confess I haven t seen the film yet but, even so, I m with Jeannette on this one. Let s face it, Brutal Truth No. 1 regarding Hollywood historicals is
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 27, 2010
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                Got to confess I haven't seen the film yet but, even so, I'm with Jeannette on this one. 
                Let's face it, Brutal Truth No. 1 regarding Hollywood "historicals" is . . . they ain't.  Dates, events, characters are ruthlessly subordinated to the convenience of The Story, so why would the costumes be an exception?  They're probably the first victims, as a very expendable budget item!
            The Yosh
               
          • Suzanne
            Movie costumes are also subject to whatever the current ideal of beauty may be. If enough time passes, the results can be charming, like the 20s costume pics
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 28, 2010
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              Movie costumes are also subject to whatever the current ideal of beauty may be. If enough time passes, the results can be charming, like the 20s costume pics that impose the fashionable drop-waisted, boyish figure on periods that featured corsets and panniers.

              Suzanne

              --- In CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com, "Diane M. Yoshitomi" <pvdame@...> wrote:
              >
              > Got to confess I haven't seen the film yet but, even so, I'm with Jeannette on this one.
              > Let's face it, Brutal Truth No. 1 regarding Hollywood "historicals" is . . . they ain't. Dates, events, characters are ruthlessly subordinated to the convenience of The Story, so why would the costumes be an exception? They're probably the first victims, as a very expendable budget item!
              > The Yosh
              >
            • fauxrari
              That s funny- my husband and I saw the movie last weekend and were arguing about the period based upon hoop skirts and this one pistol he just happens to own
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 30, 2010
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                That's funny- my husband and I saw the movie last weekend and were arguing about the period based upon hoop skirts and this one pistol he just happens to own that was made in the early 1870s. we have the best arguments. : ) Enjoy the movie. It's good.

                Lisa Klassen-Barnes

                --- In CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com, "Suzanne" <fslcoop@...> wrote:
                >
                > Movie costumes are also subject to whatever the current ideal of beauty may be. If enough time passes, the results can be charming, like the 20s costume pics that impose the fashionable drop-waisted, boyish figure on periods that featured corsets and panniers.
                >
                > Suzanne
                >
                > --- In CGWcostumers@yahoogroups.com, "Diane M. Yoshitomi" <pvdame@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Got to confess I haven't seen the film yet but, even so, I'm with Jeannette on this one.
                > > Let's face it, Brutal Truth No. 1 regarding Hollywood "historicals" is . . . they ain't. Dates, events, characters are ruthlessly subordinated to the convenience of The Story, so why would the costumes be an exception? They're probably the first victims, as a very expendable budget item!
                > > The Yosh
                > >
                >
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